New Learning Institute - Social Networkinghttp://newlearninginstitute.org/blog-topics/social-networking enYouth Social Norms and Privacy Online: Interview with danah boyd, Part IIIhttp://newlearninginstitute.org/blog/youth-social-norms-and-privacy-online-interview-danah-boyd-part-iii-0 <div class="field field-name-body field-type-text-with-summary field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even" property="content:encoded"><p><a href="https://lh6.googleusercontent.com/-l2oeCHKQvVk/S1zvJy_OWNI/AAAAAAAABYw/hdKywOx4mew/s640/RobFix_KQED_Pearson_GreenScreen037.jpg" onblur="try {parent.deselectBloggerImageGracefully();} catch(e) {}"><img src="https://lh6.googleusercontent.com/-l2oeCHKQvVk/S1zvJy_OWNI/AAAAAAAABYw/hdKywOx4mew/s640/RobFix_KQED_Pearson_GreenScreen037.jpg" alt="" border="0" style="display: block; margin: 0px auto 10px; text-align: center; cursor: hand; width: 600px; height: 450px;" class="feature-top" /></a><em><em>This post is part of a series of interviews highlighting leaders in the field of New Learning (what we call “NLI at Inquiry”). Recently, we interviewed danah boyd—Senior Researcher at Microsoft Research, Visiting Researcher at Harvard University’s Law School, and Adjunct Associate Professor at the University of New South Wales—on subjects including how youth develop online identities, social norms, and privacy issues. Here, in the third and final part of the interview, she discusses how different communities bring different behavioral norms into the online spaces.</em></em><em><em><img id="__mce_tmp" /></em></em></p><p><em></em>Listen to the full interview here, with bonus content about how youth and adults view online bullying differently. danah shares two cases from her extensive field study to illustrate how young people deal with online drama.</p><p> <object id="pcm_player_episode51035" width="600" height="102" data="http://podcastmachine.com/swf/player.swf" type="application/x-shockwave-flash"><param name="allowFullScreen" value="true" /><param name="allowScriptAccess" value="always" /><param name="src" value="http://podcastmachine.com/swf/player.swf" /><param name="allowfullscreen" value="true" /><param name="allowscriptaccess" value="always" /><param name="pluginspage" value="http://www.macromedia.com/go/getflashplayer" /><param name="quality" value="high" /><param name="wmode" value="transparent" /><param name="flashvars" value="file=http://podcastmachine.com/podcasts/8746/episodes/51035.json&amp;width=650&amp;height=111&amp;skin=http://podcastmachine.com/swf/skin_pcm1.swf&amp;fullscreen=true&amp;bgcolor=#000000&amp;playlist=bottom&amp;subscribebutton=false&amp;downloadbutton=false&amp;playlistcolumns=1&amp;playlistrows=1&amp;autostart=false&amp;playlistsize=80" /></object></p><p><!--break--><br /><strong>How do we begin to formulate social norms around new media? It sounds like what you previously said, that kids are taking practices that they used to use to communicate with each other and build community and move that to the online spaces?</strong></p><p>I think the other thing that becomes really noticeable online is that you have hugely diverse ideas of norms and they come colliding into one another in really odd ways, which is that the norms within, say, a suburb of Atlanta, of a middle class black community are going to look very different than the norms of a rural, Appalachian white community, which are going to look very different from the social norms of an urban Latino community. So you see these vastly different norms getting built out around the same technology. </p><p>In trying to reflect what happened with Myspace, one of the things that becomes really noticeable to me is that people were not prepared to see norms that were different than theirs, and they flipped out and there was a moral panic; and the irony with Facebook is that people mostly only see things that are exactly like themselves, and so they think that everything on Facebook is exactly like their type of people. And one of the things that I love is the ability to see such vastly diverse ideas of how people use Facebook, which is totally different. So even though these social norms are relatively locally defined, they’re totally different, even with the same technology.</p><p>Part of it is what we do when we go online is that we bring our friends with us, and so the norms that are common within our communities become the norms online. And you know, the fact is that there are hugely different norms, even across this country, that are inflected by cultural practices that are driven by race and ethnicity, that are driven by religion, that are driven by socioeconomic status, that are driven by any form of cultural background that you can imagine. And then, of course, overlay gender and sexuality onto this and we see all sorts of wide variations. But this doesn’t mean that people are comfortable seeing worlds that are different from theirs. Myspace was so ironic for me because during the time when everyone was flipping out about there being so much nudity and crassness, et cetera et cetera, I actually scraped a lot of Myspace and did some analysis of it and found that far more young people talked about Jesus and the Bible and used Biblical quotes than ever had sexual content on their profiles. But perceptions get scaled by those who are looking and responding, and I think that one of the things that becomes really challenging is the roles of parents in a lot of this; because I think that on one hand, a lot of parents want to breed tolerance in their kids, and on the other hand work very hard to keep their kids away from “those” type of people, for whatever characteristic “those” are in their community, and that becomes really challenging because building gated communities online, it reproduces all of the structural inequalities that we see offline.</p><p><strong>Just one more question: How do you see the trends of communication changing for young people?</strong></p><p>The United States is terribly behind on all things mobile; it was kind of depressing for so long, and it’s finally caught up. Young people in the United States are finally texting, and of course we’re seeing everything go mobile. And I think there are a lot of interesting, innovative possibilities for what mobile can mean for communication technologies, and we’re still in the uncertainty stage of what it will actually look like. But I certainly see mobile as driving a lot of this. And there’s always this interesting tension in terms of communication between private or one-to-one communication, which is heavily mobile at this point, and more group or public communication. And public for young people, by and large, means everybody that they know; it doesn’t necessarily mean all people across all space and all time. And so, young people are beginning to experiment with community services online in part because Facebook has become untenable for young people because it’s where their parents are spending time hanging out with their [parents’] friends, and you know what? It’s just kind of lame to hang out where your parents do, so Facebook is still really popular for all sorts of photo sharing, and all sorts of catching up with basic things and events and certain things like that, but you’re seeing a lot more of group communication through different kinds of services, and its still very variable and still emergent; so you see Tumblr, you see Twitter being used by some, you see UStream being used by some, you see a variety of just different tools that young people are experimenting with, but nothing is stabilized, so it’s still really the early adopter stage.</p><p><strong>Special thanks:</strong></p><p>We’d like to extend a special thanks to danah for taking the time to talk with us.</p><p><strong>Additional resources on danah boyd’s work:</strong></p><ul><li><a href="http://digitalyouth.ischool.berkeley.edu/" target="_blank">Digital Youth Network: Kids’ Informal Learning with Digital Media</a>   </li><li><a href="http://www.danah.org/papers/TakenOutOfContext.pdf" target="_blank">Taken Out of Context: American Teen Sociality in in Networked Publics</a> (PDF)</li><li><a href="http://www.danah.org/papers/WhyYouthHeart.pdf" target="_blank">Why Youth Heart Social Network Sites: The Role of Networked Publics in Teenage Social Life</a> (PDF)</li></ul></div></div></div><div class="field field-name-field-blog-topics field-type-taxonomy-term-reference field-label-above"><div class="field-label">Topics:&nbsp;</div><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><a href="/blog-topics/community" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Community</a></div><div class="field-item odd"><a href="/blog_topics/information_literacy/index.html" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Information Literacy</a></div><div class="field-item even"><a href="/blog_topics/interview/index.html" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Interview</a></div><div class="field-item odd"><a href="/blog_topics/leaders/index.html" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Leaders</a></div><div class="field-item even"><a href="/blog_topics/nli_inquiry/index.html" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">NLI at Inquiry</a></div><div class="field-item odd"><a href="/blog_topics/research/index.html" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Research</a></div><div class="field-item even"><a href="/blog_topics/social_networking/index.html" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Social Networking</a></div><div class="field-item odd"><a href="/blog-topics/web-20" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Web 2.0</a></div></div></div>Fri, 05 Aug 2011 20:29:24 +0000Jennifer Dick162 at http://newlearninginstitute.orghttp://newlearninginstitute.org/blog/youth-social-norms-and-privacy-online-interview-danah-boyd-part-iii-0#commentsYouth Social Norms and Privacy Online: Interview with danah boyd, Part IIhttp://newlearninginstitute.org/blog/youth-social-norms-and-privacy-online-interview-danah-boyd-part-ii <div class="field field-name-body field-type-text-with-summary field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even" property="content:encoded"><p><img src="http://lh6.googleusercontent.com/-l2oeCHKQvVk/S1zvJy_OWNI/AAAAAAAABYw/hdKywOx4mew/s640/RobFix_KQED_Pearson_GreenScreen037.jpg" alt="KQED Pearson" title="KQED Pearson" width="600" height="450" style="display: block; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;" id="__mce_tmp" /></p><p><span style="font-style: italic;">This post is part of a series of interviews highlighting leaders in the field of New Learning (what we call “NLI at Inquiry”). Recently, we interviewed danah boyd—Senior Researcher at Microsoft Research, Visiting Researcher at Harvard University’s Law School, and Adjunct Associate Professor at the University of New South Wales—on subjects including how youth develop online identities, social norms, and privacy issues. Here, in excerpts from Part II of the interview, she discusses how young people control private information in public online spaces by “hiding in plain sight.”</span></p><p><span style="font-weight: bold;"><!--break--></span></p><p><span style="font-weight: bold;">Would you talk a little more about the social steganography and its implications for young people’s interactions with each other? </span></p><p><span style="font-weight: bold;"></span> Social steganography as a concept is really the idea of hiding in plain sight, and my favorite example around this is a young woman that I met who I call “Carmen.” Carmen is a young Latina. She basically had a bad day: she had broken up with her boyfriend and she was feeling really, really sad, and her mother was really active on her Facebook.</p><p>[Carmen] was trying to figure out how she could post something on Facebook because she wanted to let her friends know that she was sort of having a bad day, that she was feeling really sad about the whole thing; but she didn’t want her mom to think she was suicidal, and her mom had a tendency to over-react to everything. So she was originally going to put a really sappy song lyric up and she decided that this would be too costly, that she would have to do too much explaining to her mom. So instead, she decided to post the song lyrics from The Life of Brian called “Always Look on the Bright Side of Life.” She posted the song lyrics without any context, without any reference to the movie, and her friends, who had recently seen Life of Brian with her, completely understood this, but her mother didn’t. And so when her mother saw this and said, “Oh, it’s just words,” immediately she commented, “Oh, it looks like you’re having a great day,” because “Always Look on the Bright Side of Life” is a very positive song. Her friends, on the other hand, having recently watched the movie, know that this takes place when the key character Brian is about to be executed. They immediately text her and ask how she’s doing.</p><p>So the way in which she sort of put this information out, knowing that those who were recently part of that conversation would recognize the reference, her mother would not because she knew her mother had never consumed this content, had never seen Monty Python. And it also became layered at another level, which is that all sorts of people who may have access to her profile, including her teachers, coaches, these kinds of folks, wouldn’t know what she was talking about. They may recognize Life of Brian, but they have no idea that she had just broken up with her boyfriend. There’s this way that she’s hiding this information from different audiences in different ways because you needed both of those pieces of information, the idea that she’d broken up with her boyfriend and the idea that the Monty Python movie is referring to a specific thing to really get what the context of that was.</p><p>So the key with social steganography is this idea of hiding in plain sight, and the concept of steganography is a really ancient term used to refer to the idea of wax tablets, or the idea, as horrific as it is, where people would tattoo messages on the heads of their slaves, wait until their hair grew back, and send them off; and then the person receiving them would know to shave their head to get the messages. The history of this, of course, is sordid, but it’s this idea of hiding in plain sight, that you have to know where to look. And in some ways, that’s the strongest kind of encryption you can get.</p><p>What you see is that young people are using this as a really critical strategy for putting out information where they rely on people looking at this and understanding what’s going on. And it’s really powerful to see just because it’s so much stronger of a way of encoding information than anything else. I guess I should also note that one of the things that tends to shock a lot of adults is that young people share their passwords pretty frequently. I’m waiting to get numbers on this, but we’re talking well over 50 percent have shared it with somebody, and the vast majority of [teens] have shared them with their parents who have been pretty much forceful about sharing a password. But the message that has been set forth on this is that if you trust me, you will share your password with me. Whether the trust is through coercion or not depends on the family.</p><p>What ends up happening is that teens also share their password with their friends and with their significant others. Not unlike the idea of sharing your locker combination, back when we were all in school with lockers. And so the idea is that you share as a way of signaling trust, and you also share for really functional reasons. Just like you wanted your friend to pick up your textbook at school because you were absent that day, you may want your significant other or friends to check your messages on Facebook because you can’t get access to Facebook today. So it is also really important to realize that there is a lot of information that becomes accessible functionally, so a lot more of it becomes controlling access to meaning instead of controlling the access to content.</p><p><strong>I think that kids have been doing this for a long time. I used to be a classroom teacher and I remember my students quoting song lyrics in class, or I mean, I think to some degree, some types of slang are used this way; they know their teacher is not going to know what this word is.</strong></p><p>There’s mistaken belief that everything involving new technology must be new. The vast majority of what I see young people do is modernize old strategies. They’re taking things that have been done for a long time and finding new, weird ways of doing it on the Internet.</p><p><span style="font-weight: bold;">To be continued...</span></p><p><span style="font-weight: bold;"></span>How do online youth spaces develop social norms? How do our physical communities affect our online communities? Next time we will publish Part III of our interview with danah, focusing on the answers to these questions and how mobile devices are changing youth communication trends. Our final installment will also include an unabridged audiocast with bonus content. Stay tuned!</p><p><strong>Additional resources on danah boyd’s work:</strong></p><ul><li><a href="http://digitalyouth.ischool.berkeley.edu/" target="_blank">Digital Youth Network: Kids’ Informal Learning with Digital Media</a></li><li><a href="http://www.danah.org/papers/TakenOutOfContext.pdf" target="_blank">Taken Out of Context: American Teen Sociality in Networked Publics</a> (PDF)</li><li><a href="http://www.danah.org/papers/WhyYouthHeart.pdf" target="_blank">Why Youth Heart Social Network Sites: The Role of Networked Publics in Teenage Social Life</a> (PDF)</li></ul></div></div></div><div class="field field-name-field-blog-topics field-type-taxonomy-term-reference field-label-above"><div class="field-label">Topics:&nbsp;</div><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><a href="/blog_topics/social_networking/index.html" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Social Networking</a></div><div class="field-item odd"><a href="/blog_topics/leaders/index.html" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Leaders</a></div><div class="field-item even"><a href="/blog_topics/interview/index.html" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Interview</a></div><div class="field-item odd"><a href="/blog_topics/research/index.html" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Research</a></div><div class="field-item even"><a href="/blog_topics/nli_inquiry/index.html" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">NLI at Inquiry</a></div><div class="field-item odd"><a href="/blog-topics/web-20" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Web 2.0</a></div><div class="field-item even"><a href="/blog-topics/community" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Community</a></div><div class="field-item odd"><a href="/blog_topics/information_literacy/index.html" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Information Literacy</a></div></div></div>Thu, 21 Jul 2011 18:07:00 +0000Jennifer Dick109 at http://newlearninginstitute.orghttp://newlearninginstitute.org/blog/youth-social-norms-and-privacy-online-interview-danah-boyd-part-ii#commentsExploring Google+http://newlearninginstitute.org/blog/exploring-google <div class="field field-name-body field-type-text-with-summary field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even" property="content:encoded"><p><a href="https://lh4.googleusercontent.com/-mETeBghMXMQ/TiCAPdwusqI/AAAAAAAAAMc/Zgrka76dPd0/G%25252B%252520Work%252520Stream.jpg" onblur="try {parent.deselectBloggerImageGracefully();} catch(e) {}"><img src="https://lh4.googleusercontent.com/-mETeBghMXMQ/TiCAPdwusqI/AAAAAAAAAMc/Zgrka76dPd0/G%25252B%252520Work%252520Stream.jpg" alt="" border="0" style="display: block; margin: 0px auto 10px; text-align: center; cursor: hand; width: 600px; height: 384px;" class="feature-top" /></a><br />I was pretty excited when I got my Google+ invitation last week. I might have fist-bumped the air, and just perhaps I crowed a little on Facebook by offering invitations to my friends. The flood of answering excitement never came. Two people asked for invites, and more asked, “What the heck is Google+?” My two invites aren’t posting much of anything. Even my generally tech-savvy supervisor wanted a rundown.<br /><br />To say it’s Google’s answer to Facebook is the short explanation. The interface definitely shares some strong similarities at first blush. There’s a posting box that allows you to share web links, videos, photos, or your location. There’s an activity feed and suggestions of folks you might want to add. All this works and is great.</p><p><!--break--><br /><br /><a href="https://lh5.googleusercontent.com/-n9dew3i2tVk/TiB8hNE83_I/AAAAAAAAAMw/ezf24AO6VIk/G%25252B%252520circles.jpg" onblur="try {parent.deselectBloggerImageGracefully();} catch(e) {}"><img src="https://lh5.googleusercontent.com/-n9dew3i2tVk/TiB8hNE83_I/AAAAAAAAAMw/ezf24AO6VIk/G%25252B%252520circles.jpg" alt="" border="0" style="display: block; margin: 0px auto 10px; text-align: center; cursor: hand; width: 600px; height: 259px;" class="feature-top" /></a><br />What’s really special, though, is the concept of circles. We all have different circles of people in our lives: friends, family, colleagues, people we know from specific activities, and so on; and what we might want to broadcast to one group (“hey, friends, check out this hilarious but completely inappropriate for work video!”) we don’t necessarily want to share with our coworkers, parents, or the first baseman on the weekend league softball team. To manage this on Facebook, you have a couple of options: you can send a group message with a link to the video; or, if this group of people shares such things with each other regularly, you could create a private group page. If you and your friends choose the second option, you have to visit the group page to see what’s been added to the activity feed. It’s only an extra click, but it’s still an extra step you have to take.<br /><br />Google+ lets you micromanage who sees what. Every post you make to your stream can be shared with everyone, including those without a Google+ account (public), extended circles (in not only your own circles, but also in the circles created by the people in your circles), or specific circles. When you set up your account for the first time, one of the pages you’re directed to allows you to sort your contacts into these circles. Google provides a few default circles, but you can add as many circles as you like. Once you’ve got your circles named, it’s as easy as dragging and dropping people from your Gmail address book or connecting your Yahoo! or Hotmail account using the Find and Invite function.</p><div><br /><img src="https://lh6.googleusercontent.com/-RgHnJFP3_eE/TiB8hihzrrI/AAAAAAAAAMo/1q-keSfJK8Q/G%25252B%252520privacy.jpg" alt="" align="left" border="0" style="float: left; margin: 0 10px 10px 0; cursor: hand; width: 300px; height: 193px;" />Circles aren’t just useful for selecting who sees which posts: Google+ also allows you to use them to determine the visibility of different pieces of your account profile. Users can control which circles others can see in your profile (both who you’ve connected with and who has connected to you), as well as each discrete profile section. They even use handy little icons next to each item so you can see at a glance what your privacy settings for each informational section are. To ensure that you’ve got everything theway you want it, Google has given users the ability to view their own profile as someone else. Again, you can choose to view it as a stranger on the web, or as someone in one of your circles. This allows you to make sure you’ve properly tucked things away when they’re intended only for a specific audience and not for public consumption. What about the problem of people reposting something I wanted to limit to a specific circle of people, you mayask? Well, Google’s thought of that trick, too. It’s not here yet, but the next update promises to give users the ability to lock posts down, meaning that they can’t be shared with people outside the original circle. Pretty nifty.<br /><br />Another perk is the ability to create Hangouts, which are basically group video chats. I’ve been pretty pleased with GChat, and the ability to have more than two people involved is really cool, not just from the socializing standpoint, but for business meetings. Having just tested it out, they’ve definitely considered having a group conversation—there’s plenty of real estate for lots of smiling faces.<br /><br /><a href="https://lh4.googleusercontent.com/-tqVGg9txdGE/TiB8hggV-dI/AAAAAAAAAMs/FN00xQ05dGY/G%25252B%252520notifications.jpg" onblur="try {parent.deselectBloggerImageGracefully();} catch(e) {}"><img src="https://lh4.googleusercontent.com/-tqVGg9txdGE/TiB8hggV-dI/AAAAAAAAAMs/FN00xQ05dGY/G%25252B%252520notifications.jpg" alt="" border="0" style="float: left; margin: 0 10px 10px 0; cursor: hand; width: 300px; height: 175px;" /></a>Lastly, after the wonderfully configurable privacy settings, my favorite thing about Google+ is its integration with Gmail and Google Docs. I have the (bad?) habit of keeping my Gmail open while I work so I can monitor incoming messages and put out fires quickly. Using the new Gmail theme, Google’s added a little activity counter in the upper-right corner of the screen. Right now it only appears in Gmail (with the proper theme enabled), Google Docs, and Google+, but I suspect Google Calendar will follow soon. The user interface team has done a great job of keeping it unobtrusive, and it’s very strategically placed for easy use. “Well, that’s nice,” you say, “but why is this a big deal?” By clicking on the counter, you can not only view the recent activity, but respond to posts as well without leaving off what you were doing. Lovely.<br /><br /><span style="font-style: italic;">Coming soon: Some thoughts on how to leverage Google+’s features for educators and students.</span><br /><br /><span style="font-weight: bold;">Additional Reading on Google+</span><ul><li>“<a href="http://googleblog.blogspot.com/2011/06/introducing-google-project-real-life.html">Introducing the Google+ Project: Real-life sharing, rethought for the web.</a>” Vic Gundotra. <span style="font-style: italic;">The Official Google Blog</span>. (with lots of videos!)</li><li>“<a href="https://plus.google.com/117373186752666867801/posts/PFkyoSPoQ6m?hl=en">The Great Migration to Google Plus</a>.” Dave Gray.</li><li>“<a href="http://www.good.is/post/why-google-is-an-education-game-changer/">Why Google+ Is an Education Game Changer</a>.” Liz Dwyer. <span style="font-style: italic;">GOOD</span>.</li></ul></div><div class="blogger-post-footer"><img src="https://blogger.googleusercontent.com/tracker/902885274664531497-7614959178310593424?l=newlearninginstitute.blogspot.com" alt="" width="1" height="1" /></div></div></div></div><div class="field field-name-field-blog-topics field-type-taxonomy-term-reference field-label-above"><div class="field-label">Topics:&nbsp;</div><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><a href="/blog_topics/social_networking/index.html" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Social Networking</a></div><div class="field-item odd"><a href="/blog_topics/tools/index.html" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Tools</a></div><div class="field-item even"><a href="/blog-topics/web-20" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Web 2.0</a></div><div class="field-item odd"><a href="/blog-topics/technology-education" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Technology Education</a></div><div class="field-item even"><a href="/blog-topics/community" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Community</a></div><div class="field-item odd"><a href="/blog-topics/digital-learning" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Digital Learning</a></div></div></div>Fri, 15 Jul 2011 19:02:00 +0000Jennifer Dick110 at http://newlearninginstitute.orghttp://newlearninginstitute.org/blog/exploring-google#commentsYouth Social Norms and Privacy Online: Interview with danah boyd, Part Ihttp://newlearninginstitute.org/blog/youth-social-norms-and-privacy-online-interview-danah-boyd-part-i <div class="field field-name-body field-type-text-with-summary field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even" property="content:encoded"><p><a href="https://lh6.googleusercontent.com/-l2oeCHKQvVk/S1zvJy_OWNI/AAAAAAAABYw/hdKywOx4mew/s640/RobFix_KQED_Pearson_GreenScreen037.jpg" onblur="try {parent.deselectBloggerImageGracefully();} catch(e) {}"><img src="https://lh6.googleusercontent.com/-l2oeCHKQvVk/S1zvJy_OWNI/AAAAAAAABYw/hdKywOx4mew/s640/RobFix_KQED_Pearson_GreenScreen037.jpg" alt="" border="0" style="display: block; margin: 0px auto 10px; text-align: center; cursor: hand; width: 600px; height: 450px;" class="feature-top" /></a><br /><em>This post is part of a series of interviews highlighting leaders in the field of New Learning (what we call “NLI at Inquiry”). Recently, we interviewed danah boyd—Senior Researcher at Microsoft Research, Visiting Researcher at Harvard University’s Law School, and Adjunct Associate Professor at the University of New South Wales—on subjects including how youth develop online identities, social norms, and privacy issues. Here, in excerpts from Part I of the interview, she discusses how youth navigate online privacy issues.</em></p><p><em></em><!--break--><br /><br /><a href="http://www.danah.org/images/danah/iSchool3.jpg" onblur="try {parent.deselectBloggerImageGracefully();} catch(e) {}"><img src="http://www.danah.org/images/danah/iSchool3.jpg" alt="" align="left;" border="0" style="float: left; margin: 0 10px 10px 0; cursor: hand; width: 154px; height: 240px;" /></a> danah boyd is a Senior Researcher at Microsoft Research, a Research Associate at Harvard University's Berkman Center for Internet and Society, and an Adjunct Associate Professor at the University of New South Wales. Her work examines everyday practices involving social media, with specific attention to youth engagement, privacy, and risky behaviors. She recently co-authored Hanging Out, Messing Around, and Geeking Out: Kids Living and Learning with New Media and formerly co-directed the Youth and Media Policy Working Group, funded by the MacArthur Foundation. She blogs at <a href="http://www.zephoria.org/thoughts/">http://www.zephoria.org/thoughts/</a> and tweets at @zephoria.</p><p><br /><br /></p><div> </div><div><span style="font-weight: bold;">Tell us about your current research.</span><br /><br />My research goes in a couple of different places right now. One is that I’ve been doing a lot of ethnographic work trying to understand how young people build out a sense of privacy in very public places, and that line of inquiry is really pushing back against the myth that kids don’t care about privacy. I’ve spent a long time watching young people and their engagement with social media and it’s very clear that they care deeply about privacy; so I’ve been looking at the strategies that they attempt to achieve privacy, how it fails, how they try to cope with it, who they actually consider with regard to privacy, etc. That’s a sort of fun, on-the-ground set of fieldwork.<br /><br />Another set of ongoing work that I’ve been doing is looking at some of the legal structures around kids and privacy. There are various laws in the U.S. that attempt to restrict data collection about young people, but inadvertently tend to limit their access to all sorts of online places. So I’m doing different research there. One that is about to go to the field is looking at parents’ understanding of age restrictions online…<br /><br /><span style="font-weight: bold;">What are some of the nuances of privacy that exist for young people today?</span><br /><br />The whole thing about privacy is that there are many different ways to understand what privacy is, and this has been debated by philosophers, legal scholars, political scientists, and computer scientists for a very long time, so I’m not trying to say that I have “the” answer to “What is privacy?” But it’s very clear to me when I think about teenage enactment of privacy, and I look at it from their perspective, that there are two really important factors at play, and those two really critical factors are the ability to control the social situation and the ability to have agency within that social situation.<br /><br />Control and agency are really critical factors in all this, which comes out in really important ways: even if you can technically control something, if you don’t have the agency in that environment, it doesn’t matter because you’ll lose that control immediately… Young people often lack agency in their social situations just because of the presence of their parents and their parents’ belief that they have the right to violate privacy at any given point. A good example of this is that even if a teenager can figure out how to structurally lock down their Facebook—which, albeit, is extremely difficult these days—all their parents have to do is look over their shoulder, and that really ruptures any chance to achieve a form of structural privacy. So one of the things my colleague Alice Marwick and I spend a lot of time doing in the field is looking at what are the strategies that young people do to try to achieve privacy, and how does it play out.<br /><br />We found three categories of strategies that we think are really interesting. The first is the attempt to assert social norms. This is the equivalent of putting up the “keep out” sign on the door in the bedroom, which is like, “I’m going to tell you what the social norms are, and you should follow them.” The challenge with this is the ability to assert is really an interesting one, but then the ability to regulate that assertion is extremely difficult, and this is where power comes into play in really significant ways. And so we see countless adults who are like, “Well, it’s publicly accessible, therefore I should have the right to access it,” violating any attempt to do social norm management.<br /><br />The next category of strategies that we see comes into what we think of as structural strategies. These are strategies that involve using features in the technology, locking doors, trying to deal with the architecture—whether it’s the online architecture or the physical architecture—to try to assert control over a specific space, a specific set of content. One of the things we see in all of these structural strategies is that they can often be violated through basic social hacks. Even if you can stop who sees your content, it just takes one of your friends to copy and paste things and pass it on for the structural strategy to have failed.<br /><br />The third and strongest of the strategies that we see (that we haven’t found good phrasing for, but we’re going with the idea that they’re social strategies) are when young people work to regulate access to meaning instead of trying to regulate access to content. So in other words, a good example of this would be, “Oh my god, I can’t believe what she said.” And if you post something like that, everybody who’s in the know knows who “she” is and what was said. It becomes a signal and it becomes a block. So you might be able to say, “Oh, who are you talking about here?” And depending then on how I feel about you, I may or may not tell you who that is. And needless to say, parents are usually kept in the dark on this one. That’s a way of making it visible that you’re hiding; but there’s another sub-practice in there, which I think is really interesting, which we talk about in social steganography. And the idea of social steganography—a cryptography concept—it means “hiding in plain sight.” Young people post song lyrics all the time. Some song lyrics are just song lyrics. Some song lyrics have either meaning to them specifically, generally, et cetera. And so we see young people putting up song lyrics as a way of encoding content, encoding concepts, encoding meaning into written text.<br /><br />So these are just some of the strategies that we see, and one of the things that becomes really interesting here is that obviously gender is a factor that we see, young women in particular being much more consciously aware of all these different kinds of social protocols. But what’s been really noticeable to us, and what we’re having a really hard time untangling, is that it seems like an even more salient factor has to do with class, and that the more marginalized youth are, the more innovative they seem to get with some of these strategies… And they’ve learned that there’s the idea of street smarts, and they’re taking the notion of street smarts to the digital street.<br /><br /><span style="font-weight: bold;">To be continued...</span><br /><br />How do youth view online communities? How do they navigate the different group norms of friends and family? How do they use highly contextual information to keep sensitive information private in online public places?<br /><br />Next time we will publish Part II of our interview with danah, focusing on what she’s learned about online behavioral norms and privacy from the youth with whom she’s worked.<br /><br /><strong>Additional resources on danah boyd’s work:</strong><br /><ul><li><a href="http://digitalyouth.ischool.berkeley.edu/">Digital Youth Network: Kids’ Informal Learning with Digital Media</a></li><li><a href="http://www.danah.org/papers/TakenOutOfContext.pdf">Taken Out of Context: American Teen Sociality in Networked Publics</a> (PDF)</li><li><a href="http://www.danah.org/papers/WhyYouthHeart.pdf">Why Youth Heart Social Network Sites: The Role of Networked Publics in Teenage Social Life</a> (PDF)</li></ul></div><div class="blogger-post-footer"><img src="https://blogger.googleusercontent.com/tracker/902885274664531497-4566434996105493279?l=newlearninginstitute.blogspot.com" alt="" width="1" height="1" /></div></div></div></div><div class="field field-name-field-blog-topics field-type-taxonomy-term-reference field-label-above"><div class="field-label">Topics:&nbsp;</div><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><a href="/blog_topics/social_networking/index.html" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Social Networking</a></div><div class="field-item odd"><a href="/blog_topics/leaders/index.html" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Leaders</a></div><div class="field-item even"><a href="/blog_topics/interview/index.html" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Interview</a></div><div class="field-item odd"><a href="/blog_topics/research/index.html" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Research</a></div><div class="field-item even"><a href="/blog_topics/nli_inquiry/index.html" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">NLI at Inquiry</a></div><div class="field-item odd"><a href="/blog-topics/web-20" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Web 2.0</a></div><div class="field-item even"><a href="/blog-topics/community" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Community</a></div><div class="field-item odd"><a href="/blog_topics/information_literacy/index.html" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Information Literacy</a></div></div></div>Wed, 13 Jul 2011 19:02:00 +0000Jennifer Dick111 at http://newlearninginstitute.orghttp://newlearninginstitute.org/blog/youth-social-norms-and-privacy-online-interview-danah-boyd-part-i#commentsTool Review: Storifyhttp://newlearninginstitute.org/blog/tool-review-storify <div class="field field-name-body field-type-text-with-summary field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even" property="content:encoded"><p><a href="https://lh6.googleusercontent.com/-BRtwn271k8c/Te6Ta7gMwkI/AAAAAAAAAKQ/qHGPdQklrTQ/storify%252520home.jpg" onblur="try {parent.deselectBloggerImageGracefully();} catch(e) {}"><img src="https://lh6.googleusercontent.com/-BRtwn271k8c/Te6Ta7gMwkI/AAAAAAAAAKQ/qHGPdQklrTQ/storify%252520home.jpg" alt="" border="0" style="display: block; margin: 0px auto 10px; text-align: center; cursor: hand; width: 600px; height: 236px;" class="feature-top" /></a><br /><br />One of the most common concerns I hear from educators when we’re discussing using social media tools with youth is the sheer number of sites out there. Using new media for information gathering requires patience. It can be really hard to make sense of how an event or topic is being played out across the major platforms: tracking topics across Facebook, Twitter, Tumblr, Flickr, YouTube, and blogs requires a real desire to see what’s happening in real time. Even if you’re a seasoned web browser tab jockey or use a social media aggregator like <a href="http://friendfeed.com/">FriendFeed</a>, events in a timeline without context or analysis aren’t being displayed to their best advantage.<br /><br /><a href="http://storify.com/">Storify</a> is an online platform that allows users to bring together disparate entries from various new media platforms and curate a story.</p><p><!--break--><br /><br /><a href="https://lh5.googleusercontent.com/-cMP19i7zn18/Te6Ta8zflEI/AAAAAAAAAKU/FITMnd9KzVY/storify%252520UI%2525201.jpg" onblur="try {parent.deselectBloggerImageGracefully();} catch(e) {}"><img src="https://lh5.googleusercontent.com/-cMP19i7zn18/Te6Ta8zflEI/AAAAAAAAAKU/FITMnd9KzVY/storify%252520UI%2525201.jpg" alt="" border="0" style="display: block; margin: 0px auto 10px; text-align: center; cursor: hand; width: 600px; height: 381px;" class="feature-top" /></a><br /><br /><span style="font-weight: bold;">Features</span><br />It’s easy to get started; all you need is a Twitter account. Once you log in and click the “create a story” link, you’re presented with a very intuitive interface with two basic sections. There’s a “research” section that makes it simple to search Twitter, Facebook, Flickr, YouTube, Storify, Google, RSS, or manually insert a weblink. (If you delve into the settings, it’s also possible to enable SlideShare, Causes, and Audioboo as well.) Once you’ve found something you want to add to your story, just drag it over to the timeline on the right side of the screen.<br /><br />Text can be added in-between as many story elements as you like. This means that you can contextualize, analyze, and comment on the content, which adds a depth to the service Storify offers. This could be a great way to engage youth with providing opinions on current events and may possibly provide a more natural entree into the world of news analysis and commentary. It also makes it very easy to put different points of view right next to each other, inviting the audience to draw their own conclusions. Because all story elements are linked directly from their original source, they’re always properly attributed. (But it’s invariably a good idea to talk about the importance of citing your sources!)<br /><br />Once the story is published, it can be Tweeted (with automatic short URL, and shout-outs to some of the featured content creators) or sent to your Facebook, WordPress, Posterous, Tumblr, or <a href="http://mailchimp.com/?pid=GAW&amp;source=website&amp;gclid=CKrzs-HUpKkCFcsZQgodAHcQvA">MailChimp</a> page.<br /><br /><span style="font-weight: bold;">Sample Classroom &amp; Youth Program Applications</span></p><p> </p><ul><ul><li><span style="font-weight: bold;">All Subjects—Experts in the Field:</span> Each student chooses an expert in the field of study who uses social media regularly and curates a new media collection story. Students should share why they chose a particular expert and discuss the works they post to the story. Periodically, the class should discuss new findings, events, and conferences as reported in their stories.</li></ul></ul><p> </p><ul><ul><li><span style="font-weight: bold;">All Subjects—Research:</span> Students choose a research topic related to the content area being studied in class and keep an updated Storify page that serves as a class resource.</li></ul></ul><p> </p><ul><li><span style="font-weight: bold;">Social Studies:</span> Have students choose a current event to track in social media. Work together to develop a resource evaluation rubric, and require students to explain why they chose to add each source to their story.</li></ul><p><br /><br /></p><p><span style="font-weight: bold;">Breakdown </span></p><p> </p><ul><li><span style="font-weight: bold;">Price Structure:</span> Free</li><li><span style="font-weight: bold;">Pros:</span><ul><li>Very easy to use; excellent user interface.</li><li>Simple to send stories to other media platforms.</li><li>Stories can be reorganized at will.</li></ul></li><li><span style="font-weight: bold;">Cons:</span><ul><li>Still growing a user base.</li></ul></li></ul><p><br /><br /></p><p>Do you use Storify with your youth? Do you have any activity suggestions, tips, or tricks to share? Comment below or contact us!</p><div class="blogger-post-footer"><img src="https://blogger.googleusercontent.com/tracker/902885274664531497-4840281343874788920?l=newlearninginstitute.blogspot.com" alt="" width="1" height="1" /></div></div></div></div><div class="field field-name-field-blog-topics field-type-taxonomy-term-reference field-label-above"><div class="field-label">Topics:&nbsp;</div><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><a href="/blog_topics/social_networking/index.html" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Social Networking</a></div><div class="field-item odd"><a href="/blog_topics/tools/index.html" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Tools</a></div><div class="field-item even"><a href="/blog_topics/nli_play/index.html" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">NLI at Play</a></div><div class="field-item odd"><a href="/blog_topics/digital_literacy/index.html" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Digital Literacy</a></div><div class="field-item even"><a href="/blog-topics/web-20" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Web 2.0</a></div><div class="field-item odd"><a href="/blog_topics/mobile_learning/index.html" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Mobile Learning</a></div><div class="field-item even"><a href="/blog-topics/digital-learning" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Digital Learning</a></div><div class="field-item odd"><a href="/blog_topics/information_literacy/index.html" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Information Literacy</a></div><div class="field-item even"><a href="/blog_topics/21st_century_skills/index.html" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">21st Century Skills</a></div></div></div>Tue, 07 Jun 2011 22:43:00 +0000Jennifer Dick115 at http://newlearninginstitute.orghttp://newlearninginstitute.org/blog/tool-review-storify#commentsTool Review: Looplabshttp://newlearninginstitute.org/blog/tool-review-looplabs <div class="field field-name-body field-type-text-with-summary field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even" property="content:encoded"><p><a href="https://lh5.googleusercontent.com/_6Zln-7k5oag/Tb8Oe2sCKbI/AAAAAAAAAJ8/7bV5vkZTFtg/looplabshome.jpg" onblur="try {parent.deselectBloggerImageGracefully();} catch(e) {}"><img src="https://lh5.googleusercontent.com/_6Zln-7k5oag/Tb8Oe2sCKbI/AAAAAAAAAJ8/7bV5vkZTFtg/looplabshome.jpg" alt="" border="0" style="display: block; margin: 0px auto 10px; text-align: center; cursor: hand; width: 600px; height: 372px;" class="feature-top" /></a><br /><br /><a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Music_loop">Music loops</a> have long been a staple of electronic and experimental music and have since worked their way into rock and roll, hip-hop, techno, and other musical genres. As with so many of the tools we’ve looked at, creating loops from a series of <a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sampling_%28music%29">samples</a> – once a painstaking process for all but professional music producers with special equipment – is now easy thanks to applications like Audacity and GarageBand, which make home recording and mixing fairly simple if you want to create your own audio. What if you just want to play in someone else’s musical sandbox? Then <a href="http://looplabs.com/">Looplabs</a> is for you. In-browser editor? Check. Pre-loaded samples? Check. Easy publishing? Check.<br /><br />Loop creation just got as easy as drag-and-drop.<br /><!--break--><span style="font-weight: bold;">Features</span><br />Looplabs has a number of sponsored remix studios from popular artists (2 AM Club and Willow Smith) in which users can remix the featured song. Users can also opt for the more generic Myspace-themed Music Studio.<br /><br />Once you choose your studio, the web interface opens to show a timeline in the main section of the browser window and a list of musical genres on the right side. Each genre has a list of samples that can be sorted by instrument. Samples can be previewed before being added to the timeline. Once you drag and drop a sample, it creates a new track in the editor. Sounds pretty basic, right? Well, there are a few things the Looplab people have done to make sophisticated loop creation simple for those of us who don’t have a formal music background (or are too lazy to listen to a loop and determine the time signature and beats per minute, like me).<br /><br />First, tracks are subdivided by beat-related increments. Depending on the track’s tempo and aural density, it might be subdivided by measure, by half-measure, or by quarter measure (or more!). When the track is added to the editing timeline, all sections are muted and are “turned on” by clicking on the subdivisions. Users can have the entire sample play by clicking and dragging to activate multiple subdivisions at once, or they can elect to have the sample play only during selected sections of their loop. This allows for the creation of very rich and varied soundscapes when different sections of multiple tracks are layered on top of each other and activated at different times.<br /><br /><a href="https://lh4.googleusercontent.com/_6Zln-7k5oag/Tb8Oe71VehI/AAAAAAAAAJ4/gka7xdocfa8/looplab%20ui.jpg" onblur="try {parent.deselectBloggerImageGracefully();} catch(e) {}"><img src="https://lh4.googleusercontent.com/_6Zln-7k5oag/Tb8Oe71VehI/AAAAAAAAAJ4/gka7xdocfa8/looplab%20ui.jpg" alt="" border="0" style="display: block; margin: 0px auto 10px; text-align: center; cursor: hand; width: 600px; height: 322px;" class="feature-top" /></a><br /><span style="font-weight: bold;">Sample Classroom &amp; Youth Program Applications</span></p><p> </p><ul><li><span style="font-weight: bold;">All Subjects:</span> Have students create brief loops to accompany class multimedia presentations.</li><li><span style="font-weight: bold;">English Language Arts and History:</span> Students create loops that communicate the mood and tone of a text or historical event.</li><li><span style="font-weight: bold;">Math:</span> Students create musical fractions using the beat subdivisions in the samples to demonstrate addition, subtraction, multiplication, and division of fractions. Some samples will have one subdivision to another sample’s four subdivisions to yet another sample’s eight. This gives students a visual and auditory way to experience fractions.</li><li><span style="font-weight: bold;">Music:</span> Using their knowledge of music theory and composition, students create a loop that reinterprets one of the pieces they’ve practiced or studied in class, paying attention to tempo, mood, rhythm, and phrasing. Advanced students can record their own samples.</li><li><span style="font-weight: bold;">Physical Education:</span> Have students research optimal beats-per-minute for warm-up, aerobic, and cool-down exercises. They use this information to create music loops to accompany a workout they design themselves.</li></ul><p><br /><br /></p><p><span style="font-weight: bold;">Breakdown </span></p><ul><ul><li><span style="font-weight: bold;">Price Structure: </span>Free</li><li><span style="font-weight: bold;">Pros:</span><ul><li>Pre-populated with lots of samples</li><li>Very quick and easy to start creating a loop</li><li>Easy to see how the rhythms of samples match up through marked clips</li><li>Can share via email links, social media, or blog-embedded Flash player</li><li>Encourages users to build off the work of others</li></ul></li></ul></ul><p> </p><ul><li><span style="font-weight: bold;">Cons:</span><ul><li>Had some trouble saving loops the first few times I tried the application over two different days; application timed out. May require wired Internet connection</li><li>Music genre samples aren’t terribly accurate; for example, many of the funk samples were actually closer to hip-hop</li></ul></li></ul><p><br /><br /></p><p>Do you use Looplabs with your youth? Do you have any activity suggestions, tips, or tricks to share? Comment below or contact us!</p><div class="blogger-post-footer"><img src="https://blogger.googleusercontent.com/tracker/902885274664531497-2554648426149955404?l=newlearninginstitute.blogspot.com" alt="" width="1" height="1" /></div></div></div></div><div class="field field-name-field-blog-topics field-type-taxonomy-term-reference field-label-above"><div class="field-label">Topics:&nbsp;</div><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><a href="/blog_topics/social_networking/index.html" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Social Networking</a></div><div class="field-item odd"><a href="/blog_topics/tools/index.html" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Tools</a></div><div class="field-item even"><a href="/blog_topics/nli_play/index.html" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">NLI at Play</a></div><div class="field-item odd"><a href="/blog_topics/work_based_learning/index.html" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Work-based Learning</a></div><div class="field-item even"><a href="/blog-topics/web-20" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Web 2.0</a></div><div class="field-item odd"><a href="/blog-topics/community" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Community</a></div><div class="field-item even"><a href="/blog_topics/21st_century_skills/index.html" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">21st Century Skills</a></div></div></div>Mon, 02 May 2011 20:10:00 +0000Jennifer Dick120 at http://newlearninginstitute.orghttp://newlearninginstitute.org/blog/tool-review-looplabs#commentsTool Review: DoInkhttp://newlearninginstitute.org/blog/tool-review-doink <div class="field field-name-body field-type-text-with-summary field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even" property="content:encoded"><p><a href="https://lh6.googleusercontent.com/_6Zln-7k5oag/TbBgF0ymwgI/AAAAAAAAAJQ/6-EzqwAdLzA/doink.jpg" onblur="try {parent.deselectBloggerImageGracefully();} catch(e) {}"><img src="https://lh6.googleusercontent.com/_6Zln-7k5oag/TbBgF0ymwgI/AAAAAAAAAJQ/6-EzqwAdLzA/doink.jpg" alt="" style="display: block; margin: 0px auto 10px; text-align: center; cursor: hand; width: 600px; height: 375px;" class="feature-top" border="0" /></a><br />What is it about animation that is so engaging? <a href="http://viscog.psych.northwestern.edu/publications/FranconeriSimons_Motion.pdf">Moving objects catch the eye and the viewer’s attention</a>, it’s true, but there’s more to our fascination with cartoons than the involuntary reaction of our brain to dynamic stimuli. Something about the combination of motion and illustration engages our imaginations in a completely different manner than still images or film footage.<br /><br />Children have been creating flipbooks for years &lt; <a href="http://www.flipbook.info/index_en.php">http://www.flipbook.info/index_en.php</a> &gt;, spending hours drawing a series of pictures with slight differences to approximate a moving picture when the pages are flipped. I remember making impromptu flipbooks in my school notebooks by drawing in the bottom-right corner of the pages. The drawings were necessarily simple, and the animations were limited by how thick the notebook was.<br /><br />Like so much in our culture lately, the digital revolution has changed how we work. And while there are incredibly sophisticated computer animation applications available, simple free programs are accessible for ordinary folks who don’t need all the bells and whistles of a full-fledged digital art studio. <a href="http://www.doink.com/">DoInk</a> is one such web app that makes creating <a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Flash_animation">Flash animation</a> with <a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Vector_graphics">vector graphics</a> very easy.<br /><br /><a href="https://lh5.googleusercontent.com/_6Zln-7k5oag/TbBgF9vRjUI/AAAAAAAAAJU/tKm-RSalDxs/doink%20UX.jpg" onblur="try {parent.deselectBloggerImageGracefully();} catch(e) {}"><img src="https://lh5.googleusercontent.com/_6Zln-7k5oag/TbBgF9vRjUI/AAAAAAAAAJU/tKm-RSalDxs/doink%20UX.jpg" alt="" style="display: block; margin: 0px auto 10px; text-align: center; cursor: hand; width: 600px; height: 334px;" class="feature-top" border="0" /></a><br /><br /><span style="font-weight: bold;">Features</span><br />DoInk is the MS Paint of animation applications. Use the paintbrush tool to draw a line by hand (which auto-corrects into a smoother line), fill shapes using the paint bucket, move and rotate objects using a select box—all of this will seem very standard to users of basic graphics programs. Once you’ve done your first drawing, clone the frame in the animation timeline that runs along the bottom of the window. You have the choice of redrawing or simply repositioning elements from your first drawing to create movement in the final animation (the select tool makes this very simple). A handy “ghosting” feature allows you to see a shadow of anything that’s changed position from the previous slides, making it very easy to create subtle animations if desired.<br /><br />While it’s possible to create a short animated film using the DoInk interface, it’s best suited to creating stand-alone animated pictures (see the examples below). These pictures can be shared through Facebook, Myspace, Twitter, Digg, StumbleUpon, and YouTube. You can also share via email or auto-generated embed code for use in blogs and websites.<br /><br /><object data="http://www.doink.com/a/1501120" type="application/x-shockwave-flash" width="480" height="360"><param name="src" value="http://www.doink.com/a/1501120" /><param name="allowfullscreen" value="true" /></object><br /><a href="http://www.doink.com/clips/jdick17/1501120/deep-thoughts">Deep Thoughts</a> by <a href="http://www.doink.com/users/profile/jdick17">jdick17</a>, made at <a href="http://www.doink.com">DoInk.com</a><br /><br /><span style="font-weight: bold;">Sample Classroom &amp; Youth Program Applications</span></p><p> </p><ul><li><span style="font-weight: bold;">English Language Arts:</span> Students create animated plot lines to track the most important events in a story they are reading, from exposition to climax.</li><li><span style="font-weight: bold;">Geometry:</span> Students create animations of simple geometric proofs. Create a class webpage to share this new library with students to come.</li><li><span style="font-weight: bold;">History:</span> Timelines were never so fun! While the small canvas will require some creative workarounds, students can plot a dynamic timeline sharing dates, times, and images.</li><li><span style="font-weight: bold;">Science: </span>Have students create an animation of a process or cycle. For example, in an earth sciences class, students could create a short animated film illustrating the different types of fault movement while studying plate tectonics.</li><li><span style="font-weight: bold;">Visual Art:</span> Because DoInk animations tend to be very short, it can be a great tool for having students learn how to tell a very, very short story in pictures—the art class equivalent of <a href="http://www.sixwordstories.net/2008/12/for-sale-baby-shoes-never-used-ernest-hemmingway/">Hemingway’s famous six word story</a>.</li></ul><p><br /><br /></p><p><span style="font-weight: bold;">Breakdown</span></p><ul><ul><li><span style="font-weight: bold;">Price Structure:</span> Free &amp; premium. “Coins” buy you new editing tools, backgrounds, and the ability to download animations as .AVIs or mp4s.</li><li><span style="font-weight: bold;">Pros:</span><ul><li>Drawing tool provides some auto-correction, making drawings look more polished</li><li>Fairly simple user interface allows for relatively quick builds of animated drawings</li><li>Weekly contests and active user forums encourage use</li><li>Pictures can be marked private</li><li>Users can control what actions will trigger an email notification, such as if someone comments on an animation or sends a message to the user on his/her profile page.</li></ul></li></ul></ul><p> </p><ul><li><span style="font-weight: bold;">Cons:</span><ul><li>Interface is sometimes laggy, especially on Firefox for Mac (DoInk recommends Safari for Mac users, which we found to be a smoother experience)</li><li>Uses PC keyboard shortcuts, even if you’re on a Mac (a good chance to get used to using the Control key again!)</li></ul></li></ul><p> </p><p>Do you use DoInk with your youth? Do you have any activity suggestions, tips, or tricks to share? Comment below or contact us!</p><div class="blogger-post-footer"><img src="https://blogger.googleusercontent.com/tracker/902885274664531497-1641010665255580303?l=newlearninginstitute.blogspot.com" alt="" width="1" height="1" /></div></div></div></div><div class="field field-name-field-blog-topics field-type-taxonomy-term-reference field-label-above"><div class="field-label">Topics:&nbsp;</div><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><a href="/blog_topics/social_networking/index.html" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Social Networking</a></div><div class="field-item odd"><a href="/blog_topics/tools/index.html" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Tools</a></div><div class="field-item even"><a href="/blog_topics/nli_play/index.html" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">NLI at Play</a></div><div class="field-item odd"><a href="/blog-topics/web-20" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Web 2.0</a></div></div></div>Thu, 21 Apr 2011 16:48:00 +0000Jennifer Dick121 at http://newlearninginstitute.orghttp://newlearninginstitute.org/blog/tool-review-doink#commentsTool Review: Edmodohttp://newlearninginstitute.org/blog/tool-review-edmodo <div class="field field-name-body field-type-text-with-summary field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even" property="content:encoded"><p><a href="https://lh5.googleusercontent.com/_6Zln-7k5oag/TaTWtwrZyZI/AAAAAAAAAI4/ET-K3qQgv70/edmodo%20home.jpg" onblur="try {parent.deselectBloggerImageGracefully();} catch(e) {}"><img src="https://lh5.googleusercontent.com/_6Zln-7k5oag/TaTWtwrZyZI/AAAAAAAAAI4/ET-K3qQgv70/edmodo%20home.jpg" alt="" style="display: block; margin: 0px auto 10px; text-align: center; cursor: hand; width: 600px; height: 297px;" class="feature-top" border="0" /></a><br /><br />The school where I used to teach blocked Facebook and Myspace, and this is not uncommon; many of the teachers I speak to report that their districts have similar policies. Some cite concerns that these social network destinations are too tempting for students to access during the school day, that they distract youth from concentrating on their school work. While this is a factor, the main reason these sites are blocked is safety. School districts are liable for student actions, so if youth are uploading inappropriate media or participating in online harassment, the school could be held legally responsible. The cheapest and easiest solution is to block social network access from campus. While this reaction is understandable, it’s also unfortunate, because social networks provide students with a communication platform that engages them. Many educators understand this, and so it’s gratifying to see that social networking platforms are being developed specifically for education.<br /><br />Today we’ll take a look at <a href="http://www.edmodo.com/">Edmodo</a>, a free social network for educators and their students that provides a safer alternative for online communication, collaboration, and sharing.<br /><br /><span style="font-weight: bold;">Features</span><br />Edmodo is a safer alternative because teachers control who joins their online class groups; students have to be explicitly invited in order to gain access to class group features. All activity settings default to private as well. Parents can also be invited to join; but again, the teacher has full control over group membership.<br /><br />Edmodo’s user interface and actions resemble Facebook closely, so students and teachers alike should find posting messages and links very intuitive. This isn’t a regular social network, though: it knows its audience. Teachers can post notes, alerts, assignments (complete with attachments and due dates that automatically populate the calendar), and polls—all of which can be sent to individual members or groups (classes or clubs). Group members can comment on them, extending the conversation around the shared resources—this could be a great way to prompt youth to evaluate the credibility of web links, <a href="http://www.youthmediareporter.org/2010/06/fuzzy_logic_why_students_need.html%20">a skill they really need to practice</a>. These featured posts all populate a news feed on the recipient’s home page.<br /><br />Separate from the news feed are the calendar, grades, and library tools. The calendar allows the educator to manually create events, although any assignment due dates listed using the assignment feature will automatically be transferred to the calendar. These can be specific to a group, for the teacher, or for an individual student. A gradebook is automatically generated for each group created, but it lists only those assignments that have been created and submitted through the Edmodo interface (at least as far as I can tell). The library allows educators to create online information warehouses for their own personal use, as well as student use. Document and web resources can be organized in folders that can be shared with class groups.<br /><br />There are <a href="http://help.edmodo.com/teacher/">many helpful resources</a> to guide new users through all of the features, some of which are also available in Spanish. Edmodo also has its eye on school- and district-wide implementations. They host regular webinars on topics such as “Intro to Edmodo,” “20 Ways to Use Edmodo,” and “Edmodo for Schools and Districts: Making a Plan for Widescale Use.” More information for school and district IT professionals can be found on their <a href="http://help.edmodo.com/schooldistrict/">School and District Guide</a> page.<br /><br /><a href="https://lh6.googleusercontent.com/_6Zln-7k5oag/TaTWtyJ64MI/AAAAAAAAAI8/w4-Gg4TpJDc/edmodo%20dash.jpg" onblur="try {parent.deselectBloggerImageGracefully();} catch(e) {}"><img src="https://lh6.googleusercontent.com/_6Zln-7k5oag/TaTWtyJ64MI/AAAAAAAAAI8/w4-Gg4TpJDc/edmodo%20dash.jpg" alt="" style="display: block; margin: 0px auto 10px; text-align: center; cursor: hand; width: 600px; height: 407px;" class="feature-top" border="0" /></a><br /><br /><span style="font-weight: bold;">Sample Classroom &amp; Youth Program Applications</span><br />This is the section where I usually brainstorm some possible uses of the new media tool I’m reviewing for various academic disciplines, but seeing as Edmodo is a management tool and not geared toward knowledge creation, here are some ideas for why and how I would use it with my students.</p><p> </p><ul><li><span style="font-weight: bold;">Differentiation:</span>Any group of students will have young people who require very different things to progress in their skill development and knowledge acquisition. Edmodo makes it very easy to send targeted information to individual students.<ul><li>Use private notes to post web links that remediate, support, or extend the topic being discussed in class.</li><li>Use private calendar dates to create reminders for students who require smaller, more frequent deadlines to manage their work and stay on task.</li><li>Some students with special learning needs find it much easier to communicate with others through online interfaces, which also benefit quieter, shyer students as well. Edmodo provides them with an easier way to contribute to class discussion.</li></ul></li><li><span style="font-weight: bold;">Community Building: </span>The success of a class rests largely on the development of trust in their peers and their teacher, and trust is built through shared experience, met expectations, and meeting the needs of the individual community members.<ul><li>Use notes to send interesting and funny links to the group or individual students.</li><li>Post opinion polls that solicit feedback on lessons and choice of activities for future lessons, and to check for group understanding of a topic. By allowing students a chance to participate in decision-making for the group, you’ll help them feel more invested in their class community.</li><li>Encourage students to post relevant links and documents with the group, and urge everyone to comment respectfully on these resources.</li></ul></li><li><span style="font-weight: bold;">Documentation:</span>How often have you had a fabulous class discussion but no artifacts to remember it by? What about that amazing paper Juan wrote five years ago that you’d love to use as an exemplar for your students this year, except you can’t find it in your box of student work? Edmodo’s online interface creates a record of what you all worked together to accomplish over the course of the year.<ul><li>Use the library feature to create student portfolios. Students upload work according to whatever guidelines you establish, which, if shared with the group, makes peer portfolio review a very simple matter.</li><li>Having student work submitted online, along with written student comments, makes it very easy for teachers to see what worked and what did not with a particular lesson. Refining lesson and unit materials becomes much more simple.</li></ul></li><li><span style="font-weight: bold;">Parent Involvement:</span> Teachers can invite parents to groups, which can be an easy way for them to see firsthand what’s happening in class. Between work and caring for their family, parents don’t always have time to check in with their children’s teachers as often as they’d like. Give them an option to join the class community.</li></ul><p><br /><br /></p><p><span style="font-weight: bold;">Breakdown</span></p><ul><li><span style="font-weight: bold;">Price Structure:</span> Free</li><li>Pros:<ul><li>Robust, practical tool set for teachers and students</li><li>Facebook-like interface makes it very intuitive for most users</li><li>Strong privacy controls</li><li>Easy student account setup</li><li>Mobile apps available for those with smart phones</li></ul></li><li><span style="font-weight: bold;">Cons:</span><ul><li>Can’t add assignments from within the Grade feature</li></ul></li></ul><p><br /><br /></p><p>Do you use Edmodo with your youth? Do you have any activity suggestions, tips, or tricks to share? Comment below or contact us!</p><div class="blogger-post-footer"><img src="https://blogger.googleusercontent.com/tracker/902885274664531497-1265232558836902834?l=newlearninginstitute.blogspot.com" alt="" width="1" height="1" /></div></div></div></div><div class="field field-name-field-blog-topics field-type-taxonomy-term-reference field-label-above"><div class="field-label">Topics:&nbsp;</div><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><a href="/blog_topics/technology_integration/index.html" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Technology Integration</a></div><div class="field-item odd"><a href="/blog_topics/social_networking/index.html" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Social Networking</a></div><div class="field-item even"><a href="/blog_topics/tools/index.html" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Tools</a></div><div class="field-item odd"><a href="/blog-topics/web-20" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Web 2.0</a></div><div class="field-item even"><a href="/blog-topics/community" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Community</a></div><div class="field-item odd"><a href="/blog_topics/mobile_learning/index.html" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Mobile Learning</a></div><div class="field-item even"><a href="/blog-topics/digital-learning" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Digital Learning</a></div></div></div>Tue, 12 Apr 2011 22:37:00 +0000Jennifer Dick123 at http://newlearninginstitute.orghttp://newlearninginstitute.org/blog/tool-review-edmodo#commentsTool Review: Figmenthttp://newlearninginstitute.org/blog/tool-review-figment <div class="field field-name-body field-type-text-with-summary field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even" property="content:encoded"><p><a href="https://lh4.googleusercontent.com/_6Zln-7k5oag/TZ470vmPD6I/AAAAAAAAAIg/OSdox1nwbgs/figment%20home.jpg" onblur="try {parent.deselectBloggerImageGracefully();} catch(e) {}"><img src="https://lh4.googleusercontent.com/_6Zln-7k5oag/TZ470vmPD6I/AAAAAAAAAIg/OSdox1nwbgs/figment%20home.jpg" alt="" style="display: block; margin: 0px auto 10px; text-align: center; cursor: hand; width: 600px; height: 261px;" class="feature-top" border="0" /></a><br />Popular culture would have us believe that writers work alone in a silent room, perhaps with a precisely placed picture window in front of the desk, and that their text emerges Venus-like--wholly formed, perfect and complete.<br /><br />Would that this were so.<br /><br />As a former English teacher, I know how hard it is to convince students that writing is a process that requires community. Writing the first draft is hard enough, and when kids know that no one but their teacher is going to see what they compose, it can be difficult to motivate them to go through rewrites. “After all, it’s just a school writing assignment,” they may think. “No one’s going to see how good or bad it is.” Without any exposure to the world of professional writing, students may fail to see the authenticity of the writing process; that yes, real writers do get feedback, revise, get more feedback, revise again, and so on. Teachers have tried to cope with this by incorporating writing circles into their classroom practice, but this presents challenges as well. Students know their classmates. While some will want to try to impress their peers, others may feel so comfortable with their friends (and their friends’ opinions) that they won’t take the task seriously. What’s a teacher to do?<br /><br />Well, the web 2.0 and social media revolutions have changed this by providing us a global audience and free platforms to share our work with anyone who cares to follow the conversation. We’re all content creators these days, as <a href="http://books.google.com/books?id=T1i_nQrg-vkC&amp;printsec=frontcover&amp;dq=henry+jenkins&amp;hl=en&amp;ei=X-idTdfwK42Ttwe9j_nHBA&amp;sa=X&amp;oi=book_result&amp;ct=result&amp;resnum=5&amp;ved=0CDwQ6AEwBA#v=onepage&amp;q&amp;f=fals">Henry Jenkins</a> says. Blogging can be a great way for students to get their writing published, but there are a few tacit assumptions about blog posts: they are meant for the entire world to see, and they are polished pieces of writing. So using a blogging platform as a means of collecting feedback about one’s writing isn’t always the best solution to recreating the writers’ circle concept online.<br /><br />Enter <a href="http://figment.com/">Figment</a>, a free online community designed for writers to share their works in progress, read what other authors are writing, and share their thoughts.<br /><br /><a href="https://lh4.googleusercontent.com/_6Zln-7k5oag/TZ471fxU4oI/AAAAAAAAAIk/cSFyGInCFaQ/figment%20text%20homepage.jpg" onblur="try {parent.deselectBloggerImageGracefully();} catch(e) {}"><img src="https://lh4.googleusercontent.com/_6Zln-7k5oag/TZ471fxU4oI/AAAAAAAAAIk/cSFyGInCFaQ/figment%20text%20homepage.jpg" alt="" style="display: block; margin: 0px auto 10px; text-align: center; cursor: hand; width: 600px; height: 342px;" class="feature-top" border="0" /></a><br /><span style="font-weight: bold;">Features</span><br />The Figment writing interface is very simple: text window with buttons for boldface, underline, italicize, strikethrough, and numbered and bulleted lists. There is no auto-save, so be sure to click the Save Edit button often. You add details about your work, including a description, keywords, summary, and genre. Figment provides seven covers to choose from (you can also upload your own image) and two possible page designs. Works can have multiple chapters, which can be reordered by dragging them up or down in the left-hand margin.<br /><br />The fun starts once you’ve published your first draft. Figment has a lovely dashboard for each of your works that displays your book cover, name, chapter and word count breakdown, book description, and a preview of your text. The dashboard also shows how many people have “hearted,” commented, and reviewed or shared your book via Twitter or Facebook. Readers can also award your book various responses to a “This story made me…” question: wow, blush, shiver, cry, laugh. All of these features provide quick and easy ways for people to respond to your work. After knocking out a (very) brief foreword and the beginnings of a first chapter for my test text, I confess, I’m actually feeling somewhat motivated to continue my personal writing, despite the fact that I’ve been writing a lot for work lately. If it motivates me, I expect it will also motivate your students.<br /><br /><span style="font-weight: bold;">Sample Classroom &amp; Youth Program Applications</span></p><p> </p><ul><li><span style="font-weight: bold;">English Language Arts:</span> Have students post their narrative, fictional, and/or autobiographical writing assignments on Figment, and then give them class time to read and review each other’s work.</li><li><span style="font-weight: bold;">History:</span> While studying a specific event, ask students to write a brief fictional first-person narrative of someone experiencing that event.</li><li><span style="font-weight: bold;">Science:</span> Ask students to write a short story from a molecule’s or atom’s point of view, tracing its journey throughout a specific process. For example, students might pretend they are a water molecule traveling through the water cycle.</li></ul><p><br /><br /></p><p><span style="font-weight: bold;">Breakdown</span></p><p> </p><ul><li><span style="font-weight: bold;">Price Structure:</span> Free</li><li><span style="font-weight: bold;">Pros:</span><ul><li>Allows authors to work on their project anywhere there’s an Internet connection (or cell signal, for those with smart phones).</li><li>Authors retain full copyright of their works posted to Figment, but Figment has the right to display the work for as long as the author keeps it stored in Figment.</li><li>Participation badges provide incentive for users to increase their participation in the community.</li><li>No anonymous comments: conversation tends to stay civil.</li><li>Has a <a href="http://figment.com/educators">bi-monthly newsletter</a> for educators.</li></ul></li><li><span style="font-weight: bold;">Cons</span>:<ul><li>No automatic saving.</li><li>No built-in spell check.</li></ul></li></ul><p> </p><p>Do you use Figment with your youth? Do you have any activity suggestions, tips, or tricks to share? Comment below or contact us!</p><div class="blogger-post-footer"><img src="https://blogger.googleusercontent.com/tracker/902885274664531497-8971343068844890302?l=newlearninginstitute.blogspot.com" alt="" width="1" height="1" /></div></div></div></div><div class="field field-name-field-blog-topics field-type-taxonomy-term-reference field-label-above"><div class="field-label">Topics:&nbsp;</div><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><a href="/blog_topics/technology_integration/index.html" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Technology Integration</a></div><div class="field-item odd"><a href="/blog_topics/social_networking/index.html" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Social Networking</a></div><div class="field-item even"><a href="/blog_topics/tools/index.html" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Tools</a></div><div class="field-item odd"><a href="/blog-topics/web-20" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Web 2.0</a></div><div class="field-item even"><a href="/blog_topics/21st_century_skills/index.html" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">21st Century Skills</a></div></div></div>Thu, 07 Apr 2011 22:22:00 +0000Jennifer Dick124 at http://newlearninginstitute.orghttp://newlearninginstitute.org/blog/tool-review-figment#commentsTool Review: Diigohttp://newlearninginstitute.org/blog/tool-review-diigo <div class="field field-name-body field-type-text-with-summary field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even" property="content:encoded"><p><a href="https://lh4.googleusercontent.com/_6Zln-7k5oag/TXa6MVLE5iI/AAAAAAAAAHY/p8_LJP01o5U/diigo%20home.jpg" onblur="try {parent.deselectBloggerImageGracefully();} catch(e) {}"><img src="https://lh4.googleusercontent.com/_6Zln-7k5oag/TXa6MVLE5iI/AAAAAAAAAHY/p8_LJP01o5U/diigo%20home.jpg" alt="" style="display: block; margin: 0px auto 10px; text-align: center; cursor: hand; width: 600px; height: 346px;" class="feature-top" border="0" /></a><br />One of the joys of surfing the Internet is stumbling across new websites and interesting information through the course of normal web reading. And while you can save interesting pages to your browser’s bookmarks, your bookmark folder can get cluttered really quickly. Sure, you can create sub-folders to try to organize things a bit, but it takes longer to save them and it’s harder to see how your different resources relate to each other. A number of web apps (many with desktop and mobile versions as well) fill the need to keep our bookmarks, notes, and other miscellanea stored at one place in the cloud. Some services, like <a href="http://www.evernote.com">Evernote</a>, are more note-oriented; while others, like the much-loved <a href="http://www.delicious.com/">Delicious</a>, focus on the bookmarks and sharing. <a href="http://www.diigo.com">Diigo</a> offers a convenient middle ground, providing social bookmarking, notes, and image storage in one place.<br /><br /><span style="font-weight: bold;">Features</span><br />At first blush, Diigo’s feature set seems pretty standard: Save bookmarks, notes, and pictures in one place. Tag entries for easy sorting. Because this is Web 2.0, other users can comment on whatever entries you’ve saved publicly. Because this is 2011, you can follow other Diigo users, invite your friends, create groups, and maintain a profile. The Community page shows which pages are most linked by users (lots of education technology links here).<br /><br />What really caught my eye as I was poking around their About page was the Diigo Educator Account. These people have thought about features that teachers and students need, and they’ve provided a way for teachers and classes to share and annotate information. Educators can batch-create student accounts, which automatically creates a Diigo group that includes forums.<br /><br />Student accounts default to high privacy (only teachers and classmates can communicate with them), and only education-related ads get displayed (it’s a free service, after all). You can read the <a href="http://help.diigo.com/teacher-account/faq">FAQ about Diigo Educator Accounts here</a>.<br /><br /><a href="https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/_6Zln-7k5oag/TXa6MFlYnsI/AAAAAAAAAHU/dlLhk6Hidwo/diigo%20view%20all.jpg" onblur="try {parent.deselectBloggerImageGracefully();} catch(e) {}"><img src="https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/_6Zln-7k5oag/TXa6MFlYnsI/AAAAAAAAAHU/dlLhk6Hidwo/diigo%20view%20all.jpg" alt="" style="display: block; margin: 0px auto 10px; text-align: center; cursor: hand; width: 600px; height: 474px;" class="feature-top" border="0" /></a><br /><span style="font-weight: bold;">Sample Classroom &amp; Youth Program Applications</span></p><p> </p><ul><li><span style="font-weight: bold;">All subjects</span>: Have students create topic-based groups of bookmarks for websites that pertain to subjects discussed in class. Pick a different student-selected site twice a week to evaluate together as a class for content, bias, and relevancy. This will increase student information literacy (a skill our youth today <a href="http://www.districtadministration.com/viewarticle.aspx?articleid=2529">sorely need</a>)</li><li><span style="font-weight: bold;">All subjects:</span> When students are working on a project or paper that requires online research, have them bookmark all of their web resources using Diigo. Require students to write a brief abstract for each source using the note feature to help them remember why this source may be useful to them.</li></ul><p> </p><p><span style="font-weight: bold;">Breakdown</span></p><ul><li><span style="font-weight: bold;">Price Structure:</span> Free &amp; Premium</li><li><span style="font-weight: bold;">Pros</span>:<ul><li>Educational upgrade available!</li><li>Can sort all entries by tags</li><li>Group functionality allows for collaboration</li><li>Can install toolbar in web browser for even faster indexing</li></ul></li><li><span style="font-weight: bold;">Cons:</span><ul><li>The note feature’s text editor sometimes pastes html code if you cut and paste from a Word document</li><li>Can’t display pictures in notes</li></ul></li></ul><p><br /><br /></p><p>Do you use Diigo or other cloud-based social bookmarking sites with your youth? Do you have any activity suggestions, tips, or tricks to share? Comment below or contact us!</p><div class="blogger-post-footer"><img src="https://blogger.googleusercontent.com/tracker/902885274664531497-3190653382511298724?l=newlearninginstitute.blogspot.com" alt="" width="1" height="1" /></div></div></div></div><div class="field field-name-field-blog-topics field-type-taxonomy-term-reference field-label-above"><div class="field-label">Topics:&nbsp;</div><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><a href="/blog_topics/technology_integration/index.html" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Technology Integration</a></div><div class="field-item odd"><a href="/blog_topics/social_networking/index.html" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Social Networking</a></div><div class="field-item even"><a href="/blog_topics/tools/index.html" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Tools</a></div><div class="field-item odd"><a href="/blog-topics/web-20" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Web 2.0</a></div><div class="field-item even"><a href="/blog-topics/digital-learning" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Digital Learning</a></div><div class="field-item odd"><a href="/blog_topics/21st_century_skills/index.html" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">21st Century Skills</a></div></div></div>Tue, 08 Mar 2011 23:12:00 +0000Jennifer Dick128 at http://newlearninginstitute.orghttp://newlearninginstitute.org/blog/tool-review-diigo#comments