New Learning Institute - Project Based Learninghttp://newlearninginstitute.org/blog-topics/project-based-learning enMake an Android App? There’s a Meta-App for That.http://newlearninginstitute.org/blog/make-android-app-there%E2%80%99s-meta-app <div class="field field-name-body field-type-text-with-summary field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even" property="content:encoded"><p><span style="font-weight: bold;">Google Introduces SF Bay Educators to App Inventor for Android</span></p><div><br /><a href="https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/-JDsg2KGGLzo/TgDHT9WTcTI/AAAAAAAAALY/0ReqEt-4rFs/app%252520inv%252520home.jpg" onblur="try {parent.deselectBloggerImageGracefully();} catch(e) {}"><img src="https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/-JDsg2KGGLzo/TgDHT9WTcTI/AAAAAAAAALY/0ReqEt-4rFs/app%252520inv%252520home.jpg" alt="" border="0" style="display: block; margin: 0px auto 10px; text-align: center; cursor: hand; width: 600px; height: 392px;" class="feature-top" /></a><br /><a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mobile_app">Mobile apps</a> have changed our relationship with information access in the wider world. With mobile devices such as smart phones and tablet computers becoming more powerful and affordable, more people are regularly supplementing their experiences out in the world by calling up services like Google Maps, Yelp, Facebook, Twitter, Flickr, <a href="https://foursquare.com/">Four Square</a>, and <a href="http://www.shazam.com/">Shazam</a> to record what they’re doing, find out what other people thought about whatever restaurant/park/business they’re at, or share their own opinion.<br /><br />Ten years ago, if I passed a statue of some historic figure and wanted to learn more, I’d have to make a note and then go visit the library. Now, I can just whip out my phone and Google the name. I can also use my phone to take a geo-tagged picture, upload it to Flickr (which will automatically highlight it in my Facebook feed), share a web link about what I learned about the statue on Twitter, and check in on Four Square. What’s that song playing at the café I just passed? Shazam! “Bossa for the Devil” by Dr. Rubberfunk. Apps are changing how we interact with the world.<br /><br />For youth, using apps to learn more about places as they experience them is second nature, and those apps can be powerful learning tools. What isn’t second nature is app development. Designing and building a working app generally requires some serious programming savvy, but youth are very interested in apps—they see how relevant apps are to daily life and how they’re being used by more people, more frequently—and this motivates those with an interest in tech to take the programming plunge. Learning programming can be a long slog through lots of information to create very simple programs. I remember taking an intro to CS class, which had us learn <a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/BASIC">BASIC</a>. I can’t find my notes, but I’m pretty sure it took us a week to know enough to code the “Hello, world” program that seems to be lesson 1 for just about any programming course, regardless of language. My classmates and I found our interest in programming waning fast. And if motivated college students ten years ago lost their interest so quickly, imagine what happens with the youth of today, living at a mile a minute.</div><div><!--break--><br /><a href="https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/-NMYYoa-MKns/TgDGhAmSKHI/AAAAAAAAALk/xO9yraMGXw8/AppInv%252520Srn1.jpg" onblur="try {parent.deselectBloggerImageGracefully();} catch(e) {}"><img src="https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/-NMYYoa-MKns/TgDGhAmSKHI/AAAAAAAAALk/xO9yraMGXw8/AppInv%252520Srn1.jpg" alt="" align="left" border="0" style="float: left; margin: 0 10px 10px 0; cursor: hand; width: 300px; height: 170px;" /></a>Enter <a href="http://appinventor.googlelabs.com/about/index.html">App Inventor for Android</a>, a web-based app that allows users to both design and build apps utilizing a drag-and-drop user interface. One screen controls the UI (user interface) and builds the code using puzzle-piece like blocks that are put together to create the app. It's not foolproof, but it doeseliminate nearly all syntax errors from programming. There are a number of <a href="http://appinventor.googlelabs.com/learn/">online tutorials</a> for building sample apps that walk you through different functionality possibilities. They'renot particularly kid friendly, but adults can get through them fairly easily. Don’t have an Android device to test on? No problem: you can install an Android emulator on your computer. While not as fun as seeing your app work on the phone, it does provide faster feedback as you tweak your app. When your app is finished (the first sample app took me only about 10 minutes to create), you can save it to your Android device and take it with you.<br /><br /><br /><img src="https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/-05X4xsuDKjA/TgDGg1cLeGI/AAAAAAAAALc/8ivwwvRX2Mw/app%252520inv%252520blocks%252520ed.jpg" alt="" align="left" border="0" style="float: left; margin: 0 10px 10px 0; cursor: hand; width: 300px; height: 146px;" />The palette for app building is large and includes a drawing canvas, password textboxes, tinyDB (tiny database) support, and a media player; and you can tap the device’s phone, SMS, Twitter camera, accelerometer, location sensor, and device orientation sensor. Google has also included tools for use with Lego Mindstorm robot controls, which should interest robotics educators.<br /><br />Our hosts at Google shared two case studies of how App Inventor's already being used by educators, both after-school programs that won the 2010 DML Competition, sponsored by the MacArthur Foundation:</div><div><ul><li><a href="http://youth-lab.org/index.html">Youth Lab's</a> <a href="http://youth-lab.org/youthAPPLab.html">Youth AppLab</a>: Youth based in Washington DC get hands-on experience developing mobile apps, learning the software development cycle in the process. It's been so successful that parents are asking for workshops, too.</li><li><a href="http://www.youthradio.org/">Youth Radio</a>: Youth in Oakland are teaming up with professional developers through their <a href="http://www.youthradio.org/mobileapplab">Mobile Action Lab</a> to propose, create, and market apps that address real needs in their communities.</li></ul>App Inventor for Android is still in beta and it has its issues (mostly around phone recognition in our workshop), but it has a very active user forum with helpful folks, including a <a href="https://groups.google.com/forum/embed/?parenturl=http://appinventor.googlelabs.com/forum/&amp;showsearch=true&amp;fragments=true#%21forum/app-inventor-instructors">dedicated forum page for educators</a>. I look forward to really digging into this tool to see what it can do, as well as hearing how other educators are using it with their youth.</div><div class="blogger-post-footer"><img src="https://blogger.googleusercontent.com/tracker/902885274664531497-2750124153934379448?l=newlearninginstitute.blogspot.com" alt="" width="1" height="1" /></div></div></div></div><div class="field field-name-field-blog-topics field-type-taxonomy-term-reference field-label-above"><div class="field-label">Topics:&nbsp;</div><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><a href="/blog_topics/tools/index.html" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Tools</a></div><div class="field-item odd"><a href="/blog-topics/nli-play" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">NLI at Play</a></div><div class="field-item even"><a href="/blog-topics/place-based-learning" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Place Based Learning</a></div><div class="field-item odd"><a href="/blog-topics/best-practices" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Best Practices</a></div><div class="field-item even"><a href="/blog-topics/project-based-learning" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Project Based Learning</a></div><div class="field-item odd"><a href="/blog-topics/professional-development" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Professional Development</a></div><div class="field-item even"><a href="/blog-topics/technology-education" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Technology Education</a></div><div class="field-item odd"><a href="/blog-topics/mobile-learning" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Mobile Learning</a></div><div class="field-item even"><a href="/blog-topics/digital-learning" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Digital Learning</a></div><div class="field-item odd"><a href="/blog-topics/21st-century-skills" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">21st Century Skills</a></div></div></div>Tue, 21 Jun 2011 16:37:00 +0000Jennifer Dick112 at http://newlearninginstitute.orghttp://newlearninginstitute.org/blog/make-android-app-there%E2%80%99s-meta-app#commentsDigital Dispatch: Biodiversity Quest in Chicago, Week 3http://newlearninginstitute.org/blog/digital-dispatch-biodiversity-quest-chicago-week-3 <div class="field field-name-body field-type-text-with-summary field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even" property="content:encoded"><p><a href="http://3.bp.blogspot.com/-qA7TfiKyeS8/Tfvu8bgQmxI/AAAAAAAABRA/27PXAdwmah4/s1600/group_clipboard.JPG" onblur="try {parent.deselectBloggerImageGracefully();} catch(e) {}"><img src="http://3.bp.blogspot.com/-qA7TfiKyeS8/Tfvu8bgQmxI/AAAAAAAABRA/27PXAdwmah4/s400/group_clipboard.JPG" alt="" border="0" style="display: block; margin: 0px auto 10px; text-align: center; cursor: hand; width: 400px; height: 266px;" id="BLOGGER_PHOTO_ID_5619347682017450770" /></a></p><div> </div><div><em>The students from Bouchet Academy are scattered around the Tropical River area at Lincoln Park Zoo's McCormick Bird House taking part in an ethology activity (the study of animal behavior) to sharpen their scientific observation skills. A variety of birds surround them, mostly nestled in small trees or walking on the ground. Occasionally, a bird flies over the students’ heads and someone tries to snap a picture with their smartphone. Each student has selected a bird in the area to watch closely for three minutes. Every ten seconds a zoo staff member directs them to “Look!” and the students quickly make a note on their clipboard about the behavior their particular bird exhibits.</em></div><div> <!--break--></div><div>The highlight of the third week of the Biodiversity Quest program in Chicago was the first field trip to Lincoln Park Zoo. Unlike some school field trips to the zoo that must keep to a tight schedule and don’t always allow time for personal exploration, the youth participants in the Biodiversity Quest program were given time to explore the exhibits that most interested them. These youth also had a unique purpose for their visit: to research information for the mobile quests they would be designing over the next five weeks.</div><div> </div><div>The packed day started off with an introduction from Director of Student and Teacher Programs, Dr. Leah Melber. She offered the students suggestions on what to include in their mobile quests. In one instance, for those students who selected a species that is less active during the day at the zoo, she suggested that they add videos or photos from the ARKive.org website to their quests to enhance a visitor’s understanding of that species when they visit its exhibit at the zoo. Next, Dr. Melber led the BQ participants through the ethology activity in the Bird House. After learning how to observe species closely through this activity, the students were then ready to explore the zoo! During their first round of exploration, the students used <a href="http://www.lpzoo.org/education/educators-resources">Zoo Tracks</a> guides. These curriculum brochures, created by the Zoo, educate young people about a particular theme, such as predator-prey relationships, and then lead the visitor to different species around the zoo that exemplify that theme. The guides helped the students orient to zoo grounds, but also served as an example of how to draw connections between several exhibits, similar to what they will do when designing their own mobile quests.</div><div> </div><div>Finally, the small groups had time to walk around to visit the exhibits in which they were most interested. Not surprisingly, this led most of the groups to the <a href="http://www.lpzoo.org/regenstein-center-african-apes">Regenstein Center for African Apes</a> for a visit with the gorillas and chimpanzees. Students navigated their way around the zoo documenting what they saw as they moved from exhibit to exhibit. By the end of the day, the students’ smartphones, clipboards, and minds were packed with research and ideas for building their quests back at the school.</div><div style="font-weight: bold;"> </div><div class="blogger-post-footer"><img src="https://blogger.googleusercontent.com/tracker/902885274664531497-1681123836399283704?l=newlearninginstitute.blogspot.com" alt="" width="1" height="1" /></div></div></div></div><div class="field field-name-field-blog-topics field-type-taxonomy-term-reference field-label-above"><div class="field-label">Topics:&nbsp;</div><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><a href="/blog-topics/digital-literacy" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Digital Literacy</a></div><div class="field-item odd"><a href="/blog-topics/project-based-learning" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Project Based Learning</a></div><div class="field-item even"><a href="/blog-topics/mobile-learning" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Mobile Learning</a></div><div class="field-item odd"><a href="/blog-topics/digital-learning" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Digital Learning</a></div></div></div>Sat, 18 Jun 2011 00:09:00 +0000Nancy Chou113 at http://newlearninginstitute.orghttp://newlearninginstitute.org/blog/digital-dispatch-biodiversity-quest-chicago-week-3#commentsNew Media and the Chicago Public Library: Interview with Mary Dempsey, Part IIhttp://newlearninginstitute.org/blog/new-media-and-chicago-public-library-interview-mary-dempsey-part-ii <div class="field field-name-body field-type-text-with-summary field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even" property="content:encoded"><p><a href="http://2.bp.blogspot.com/-Rd63LsxThls/Td_7NlSOxII/AAAAAAAABeM/T7Dgsimoguw/s1600/CPL_amercy" onblur="try {parent.deselectBloggerImageGracefully();} catch(e) {}"><img src="http://2.bp.blogspot.com/-Rd63LsxThls/Td_7NlSOxII/AAAAAAAABeM/T7Dgsimoguw/s1600/CPL_amercy" alt="" border="0" style="display: block; margin: 0px auto 10px; text-align: center; cursor: hand;" class="feature-top" id="BLOGGER_PHOTO_ID_5611479871492375682" /></a></p><div><p><em>This post is part of a series of interviews highlighting leaders in the field of New Learning (what we call “NLI at Inquiry”). <a href="http://newlearninginstitute.blogspot.com/2011/05/new-media-and-chicago-public-library.html">Recently, we interviewed Chicago Public Library Commissioner Mary Dempsey</a> on subjects including how the library has reshaped the city, new media’s role in the library, and her thoughts on the future of urban libraries. Here, in Part II of the interview, she discusses the ways that CPL’s new media learning center, YOUmedia, meets the needs of youth in Chicago and her thoughts on how urban libraries will evolve to meet students’ needs in the future.</em></p><p><em>Listen to the full interview here:</em></p><div><br /><em><object id="pcm_player_episode47331" style="height: 110px;" width="600" height="110px" data="http://podcastmachine.com/swf/player.swf" type="application/x-shockwave-flash"><param name="allowFullScreen" value="true" /><param name="allowScriptAccess" value="always" /><param name="quality" value="high" /><param name="wmode" value="transparent" /><param name="flashvars" value="file=http://podcastmachine.com/podcasts/8746/episodes/47331.json&amp;width=650&amp;height=111&amp;skin=http://podcastmachine.com/swf/skin_pcm1.swf&amp;fullscreen=true&amp;bgcolor=#000000&amp;playlist=bottom&amp;subscribebutton=false&amp;downloadbutton=false&amp;playlistcolumns=1&amp;playlistrows=1&amp;autostart=false&amp;playlistsize=80" /><param name="src" value="http://podcastmachine.com/swf/player.swf" /><param name="allowfullscreen" value="true" /><param name="allowscriptaccess" value="always" /><param name="pluginspage" value="http://www.macromedia.com/go/getflashplayer" /></object></em></div></div><p><strong><!--break--></strong><strong>Commissioner Dempsey, what specific needs is the YOUmedia center meeting for Chicago's youth?</strong></p><p>It’s a place for youth to come and feel comfortable and welcome. We don’t even advertise it. But through the word of mouth and their whole social network, it’s out there dramatically. I would say 50% of the kids who are part of YOUmedia don’t physically show up there; they are in the social network, and they are talking with their peers, critiquing each other’s work, and enhancing their writing skills just through the social network – or they’re appearing in person every day, or once a week, or once every couple of weeks at YOUmedia. There are some kids who come every day after school faithfully. I guarantee these are not kids who would have normally come to a public library after school, but they see this as a place to spark their creativity, to feel safe, to do their homework, to work with their peers from other schools. We serve kids from high schools across the city: public, parochial, private schools… In any given day, you’ll see kids in ROTC uniforms working with kids dressed like hip-hop artists. In a normal school setting, those are two groups that may not necessarily mix. And you’ll see kids working beautifully together, because they’re coming together around interest-driven learning. It’s a project that excites them and they want to work on it together, whether it’s art, or science, or technology, or poetry. We’re seeing them – without any difficulty at all – kids from different high schools talking to each other, working together; different age groups talking together and working together. There are none of the tensions that they might be expected to emulate in the outside world; none of that is brought into the library. So they see the library in a whole new light as a place that is really engaging their brain, which we love.</p><p><strong>How do you envision the future of urban libraries?</strong></p><p>I envision the future of urban libraries as very bright, because I think urban libraries understand that, in order to continue to be that place of lifelong learning and information literacy for the people of our cities, we have to stay ahead of the technology curve, we have to embrace new ideas; but we don’t have to just willy-nilly embrace any technology. We have to say, “How does this serve our mission?” In our case, YOUmedia worked for us because it was something that we fashioned together, that we created together. We brought the print, the book collections in with the technology, mentors, and librarians. I see that as the future. I see urban libraries as continuing to be those very important, strong community anchors that really provide a higher quality of life for families, for children, for small business owners, for seniors in every neighborhood of our city. It’s one of the reasons why Mayor Daley made it a point to build 59 new libraries in his 22 years in office. And it’s why Mayor Emanuel [the new incumbent] is very interested in what we are doing, where we’re building, and how we’re using digital learning to continue to enhance our mission. We will always have print, and we will always have technology – and the balance will be something that we’ll constantly work on – but we know there’s nothing wrong with embracing both of those formats in order to provide better access for what people need, whether it’s fiction, or nonfiction, or movies, or music, or research, or their own content that they generate themselves using our technology – this is all part of lifelong learning; it’s all part of quality of life; it’s all part of an appreciation for the people that live in the city by the government that helps support them.</p><p><strong>Special Thanks</strong></p><p>We’d like to extend a special thanks to Chicago Public Library Commissioner Mary Dempsey for taking the time to talk with us.</p><p><strong>Additional resources on Chicago Public Library, YOUmedia, and urban libraries:</strong></p><ul><li><a href="http://www.chipublib.org/">Chicago Public Library</a></li><li><a href="http://www.chipublib.org/eventsprog/programs/onebook_onechgo.php">One Book, One Chicago</a></li><li><a href="http://youmediachicago.org/">YOUmedia</a></li><li><a href="http://youmediachicago.org/24-one-book-one-chicago/pages/61-overview">YOUmedia’s One Book, One Chicago workshops</a></li><li><a href="http://urbanlibraries.org/">Urban Libraries Council</a></li></ul><div class="blogger-post-footer"><img src="https://blogger.googleusercontent.com/tracker/902885274664531497-7773062734534394213?l=newlearninginstitute.blogspot.com" alt="" width="1" height="1" /></div></div></div></div><div class="field field-name-field-blog-topics field-type-taxonomy-term-reference field-label-above"><div class="field-label">Topics:&nbsp;</div><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><a href="/blog-topics/libraries" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Libraries</a></div><div class="field-item odd"><a href="/blog-topics/leaders" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Leaders</a></div><div class="field-item even"><a href="/blog-topics/interview" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Interview</a></div><div class="field-item odd"><a href="/blog-topics/project-based-learning" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Project Based Learning</a></div><div class="field-item even"><a href="/blog-topics/nliatinquiry" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">NLIatInquiry</a></div><div class="field-item odd"><a href="/blog-topics/community" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Community</a></div><div class="field-item even"><a href="/blog-topics/digital-learning" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Digital Learning</a></div></div></div>Tue, 31 May 2011 18:52:00 +0000Sarah Davis116 at http://newlearninginstitute.orghttp://newlearninginstitute.org/blog/new-media-and-chicago-public-library-interview-mary-dempsey-part-ii#commentsNew Media and the Chicago Public Library: Interview with Mary Dempsey, Part I.http://newlearninginstitute.org/blog/new-media-and-chicago-public-library-interview-mary-dempsey-part-i <div class="field field-name-body field-type-text-with-summary field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even" property="content:encoded"><p><a href="http://2.bp.blogspot.com/-Rd63LsxThls/Td_7NlSOxII/AAAAAAAABeM/T7Dgsimoguw/s1600/CPL_amercy" onblur="try {parent.deselectBloggerImageGracefully();} catch(e) {}"><img src="http://2.bp.blogspot.com/-Rd63LsxThls/Td_7NlSOxII/AAAAAAAABeM/T7Dgsimoguw/s1600/CPL_amercy" alt="" style="display: block; margin: 0px auto 10px; text-align: center; cursor: hand;" class="feature-top" id="BLOGGER_PHOTO_ID_5611479871492375682" border="0" /></a></p><div> </div><div><em><em>This post is part of a series of interviews highlighting leaders in the field of New Learning (what we call “NLI at Inquiry”). Recently, we interviewed Chicago Public Library Commissioner Mary Dempsey on subjects including how the library has reshaped the city, new media’s role in the library, and her thoughts on the future of urban libraries. Here, in Part I of the interview, she discusses how the Chicago Public Library has impacted the city and urban youth through their new media learning center, YOUmedia.</em></em></div><div> </div><div>Listen to the full interview here:</div><div><br /><object id="pcm_player_episode47331" style="height: 110px;" data="http://podcastmachine.com/swf/player.swf" type="application/x-shockwave-flash" width="600" height="110px"><param name="allowFullScreen" value="true" /><param name="allowScriptAccess" value="always" /><param name="quality" value="high" /><param name="wmode" value="transparent" /><param name="flashvars" value="file=http://podcastmachine.com/podcasts/8746/episodes/47331.json&amp;width=650&amp;height=111&amp;skin=http://podcastmachine.com/swf/skin_pcm1.swf&amp;fullscreen=true&amp;bgcolor=#000000&amp;playlist=bottom&amp;subscribebutton=false&amp;downloadbutton=false&amp;playlistcolumns=1&amp;playlistrows=1&amp;autostart=false&amp;playlistsize=80" /><param name="src" value="http://podcastmachine.com/swf/player.swf" /><param name="allowfullscreen" value="true" /><param name="allowscriptaccess" value="always" /><param name="pluginspage" value="http://www.macromedia.com/go/getflashplayer" /></object><p><a href="http://3.bp.blogspot.com/-CJr2-2YwHJo/Td_5dYV8tBI/AAAAAAAABeE/Js_GuI6mzLc/s1600/MDempseyHeadshot.jpg" onblur="try {parent.deselectBloggerImageGracefully();} catch(e) {}"><img src="http://3.bp.blogspot.com/-CJr2-2YwHJo/Td_5dYV8tBI/AAAAAAAABeE/Js_GuI6mzLc/s320/MDempseyHeadshot.jpg" alt="" style="float: left; margin: 0 10px 10px 0; cursor: hand; width: 214px; height: 320px;" id="BLOGGER_PHOTO_ID_5611477943872959506" border="0" /></a>Mary Dempsey has served as Commissioner of the Chicago Public Library since 1994, when she was appointed to the position by Mayor Richard M. Daley. Dempsey was reappointed to continue as library commissioner by incoming Mayor Rahm Emanuel in May 2011. The Library is comprised of more than 1,100 employees in over 75 neighborhood locations. Under her direction, 44 new libraries have been constructed, 10 of which are LEED (green building) certified. Starting in 2009, construction on the first of 16 additional libraries began. Two new libraries opened in 2010, and four will open in 2011. Also under her direction, all libraries have been equipped with state-of-the-art technology, including free desktop and WiFi access to the Internet and access to more than 80 online databases, in addition to offering rich book collections and innovative reading and educational programs. The Chicago Public Library has successfully concluded its second five-year strategic plan, <strong>CPL 2010,</strong> and begins its next strategic planning effort in 2011.<strong> </strong>Dempsey holds a B.A. from St. Mary’s University, an M.L.S. from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, and a J.D. from DePaul University. She serves as Chair of the Board of Trustees of DePaul University and is a past Chair of the Urban Libraries Council.</p><p class="p1"><strong>Commissioner Dempsey, how has the Chicago Public Library reshaped the city?</strong></p><p class="p1">In many ways, large and small. We have, under Mayor Daley in his 22 years as mayor, built 59 new libraries. Those have been in neighborhoods where either we had no presence at all, or we had very small storefront presence in a couple of locations... In some neighborhoods, we acquired liquor stores, derelict buildings, or motels where bad things happened during all hours. By tearing them down and building a brand-new, beautiful multimillion-dollar branch library, we brought not only the resources of the library to the neighborhood – books, technology, trained professional librarians – but just an overall change in quality of life… We’ve seen it transform neighborhood after neighborhood … [and] how that has made people very proud of their neighborhood and really has helped them tremendously.</p><p class="p1"><strong>What is the role that new media has played in adding to the success of the Chicago Public Library?</strong></p><p class="p1"><a href="http://youmediachicago.org/">YOUmedia</a> has been so exciting for us because it really has validated for us that libraries can be the central node on the learning network where teens, youth – and even adults, we think, eventually; but certainly now we know teens – can come together around interest-driven learning and can feel very welcomed in a public library. We never wanted to just put computer games out there and say, “Have at it.” What we wanted was content and context – and that’s what YOUmedia brings. It brings a context of: You like technology? That’s great. What are you going to do with it? How do you use it? How do you use it to explore your world? To explore what you’re reading? To explore what you want to learn in school; or what you’re not learning in school but want to learn anyway?… So, we’ve found some really exciting projects that have come out of the [student] teams in YOUmedia: even they [the students themselves] were stunned at the quality and the caliber of the work that they did, and the exploration that they did… They’re really and truly learning. We think YOUmedia is the future of learning.</p><p class="p1"><strong>Can you go into more detail about the exciting YOUmedia projects you mentioned?</strong></p><p class="p1">…Twice a year we offer a program called <a href="http://www.chipublib.org/eventsprog/programs/onebook_onechgo.php">One Book, One Chicago</a>. [The Chicago Public Library] will ask the entire city of Chicago to read the same book and discuss it. In YOUmedia, that means that teens read the book, talk about it together, and then use digital technology, music, art, poetry, multimedia, [and/or] mixed media to interpret what they read, whether it is Carl Smith’s book about urban planning in Chicago and reimagining their neighborhood…or Toni Morrison’s A Mercy … We had them work on our latest project, [featuring] <a href="http://www.neilgaiman.com/works/Books/Neverwhere/">Neverwhere by Neil Gaiman</a>, which was fantasy. The projects that came out of <a href="http://youmediachicago.org/24-one-book-one-chicago/pages/68-neverwhere-spring-2011">Neverwhere [workshops]</a> were, as you would imagine, exciting, unusual, and fantastic. But the projects that came out of <a href="http://youmediachicago.org/24-one-book-one-chicago/pages/65-a-mercy-fall-2010">A Mercy [workshops]</a> were so powerful, and so strong, and thoughtful. I was just talking to a friend of mine who, as an adult, said, “Gosh, Toni Morrison’s work is so hard to read, I almost need a teacher with me when I read it.” These teens read it, discussed it, lived it, and then created incredibly beautiful, honest, very raw pieces of poetry, art, and music related to what they read in A Mercy… When they’re tuned into something they want to do, they move into new realms by exploring it in multi dimensions with YOUmedia.</p><p class="p1"><strong>To be continued...</strong></p><p class="p1">How does the library meet the needs of urban students in an ever-changing new media environment? How will urban libraries change to accommodate students in the future?</p><p class="p1">Part II of our interview with Chicago Public Library Commissioner Mary Dempsey will focus on how YOUmedia brings diverse students together and her thoughts on the future of urban libraries<span class="s3">.</span></p><p class="p1"><strong>Additional resources on the Chicago Public Library, YOUmedia, and urban libraries:</strong></p><ul class="ul1"><li class="li1"><a href="http://www.chipublib.org/">Chicago Public Library</a></li><li class="li4"><span class="s6"><a href="http://www.chipublib.org/eventsprog/programs/onebook_onechgo.php">One Book, One Chicago</a> </span></li><li class="li4"><span class="s6"><a href="http://youmediachicago.org/">YOUmedia</a></span></li><li class="li1"><a href="http://youmediachicago.org/24-one-book-one-chicago/pages/61-overview">YOUmedia’s One Book, One Chicago workshops</a></li><li class="li1"><a href="http://urbanlibraries.org/">Urban Libraries Council</a></li></ul></div><div class="blogger-post-footer"><img src="https://blogger.googleusercontent.com/tracker/902885274664531497-3167328458624915862?l=newlearninginstitute.blogspot.com" alt="" width="1" height="1" /></div></div></div></div><div class="field field-name-field-blog-topics field-type-taxonomy-term-reference field-label-above"><div class="field-label">Topics:&nbsp;</div><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><a href="/blog-topics/libraries" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Libraries</a></div><div class="field-item odd"><a href="/blog-topics/leaders" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Leaders</a></div><div class="field-item even"><a href="/blog-topics/interview" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Interview</a></div><div class="field-item odd"><a href="/blog-topics/project-based-learning" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Project Based Learning</a></div><div class="field-item even"><a href="/blog-topics/nliatinquiry" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">NLIatInquiry</a></div><div class="field-item odd"><a href="/blog-topics/community" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Community</a></div><div class="field-item even"><a href="/blog-topics/digital-learning" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Digital Learning</a></div></div></div>Wed, 25 May 2011 16:43:00 +0000Sarah Davis117 at http://newlearninginstitute.orghttp://newlearninginstitute.org/blog/new-media-and-chicago-public-library-interview-mary-dempsey-part-i#commentsDigital Dispatch: Biodiversity Quest in Chicago, Week #2http://newlearninginstitute.org/blog/digital-dispatch-biodiversity-quest-chicago-week-2 <div class="field field-name-body field-type-text-with-summary field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even" property="content:encoded"><p><a href="http://3.bp.blogspot.com/-xGUEcgMUnFM/TdWQi_es4JI/AAAAAAAABQw/pb4AATm5beQ/s1600/BQ_week2_1.JPG" onblur="try {parent.deselectBloggerImageGracefully();} catch(e) {}"><img src="http://3.bp.blogspot.com/-xGUEcgMUnFM/TdWQi_es4JI/AAAAAAAABQw/pb4AATm5beQ/s400/BQ_week2_1.JPG" alt="" style="display: block; margin: 0px auto 10px; text-align: center; cursor: hand; width: 400px; height: 267px;" id="BLOGGER_PHOTO_ID_5608547841789976722" border="0" /></a><br /><span style="font-size: 85%;"><span style="font-family: verdana;">The second week of the Biodiversity Quest program at Bouchet Academy in Chicago exposed the middle school participants to the concepts of biodiversity and conservation biology. Merove Heifetz and Liana Vitali, from the ARKive team, visited the class and led them in <a href="http://www.arkive.org/education/resources">several activities</a> to help them understand the importance of maintaining a diversity of species around the world, as well as the many threats that species and their habitats encounter. The ARKive team took the students on a “safari” through the ARKive website that taught them more about threatened animals and plants around the world, but also required the students to learn the many ways you can search for species on the ARKive website, including by their threatened status, habitat, or geography. The students were excited to learn about animals they'd never heard of before like the <a href="http://www.arkive.org/tennents-leaf-nosed-lizard/ceratophora-tennentii/">Tennent's leafed-nosed lizard</a> from Asia and the <a href="http://www.arkive.org/atlantic-royal-flycatcher/onychorhynchus-swainsoni/">Atlantic royal flycatcher</a> from South America. The young people were also intrigued to find out new facts about species they were already familiar with, like the <a href="http://www.arkive.org/koala/phascolarctos-cinereus/">koala</a>. The ability to immediately access videos and photos of these species on the ARKive website helped the students become excited about the research they will have to do on the species highlighted in their quests.

<br /><br />The Biodiversity Quest participants were also able to use Skype to interview a conservation biologist from the <a href="http://www.janegoodall.org/">Jane Goodall Institute</a>. Lilian Pintea called the class from Washington, DC and talked about the importance of conservation of chimpanzees and why he became involved with this work. The students were eager to ask him questions about what he does and the species he works to save. One student asked, “What made you interested in Conservation Biology?” Lilian replied, “After learning so much about different species, I realized the impact that we all have on many levels - social, economic, political – on the well-being of a species and the responsibility we have to take action.”<br /><br />

Stay tuned for the next update from the Biodiversity Quest program at Bouchet Academy! </span> </span></p><div class="blogger-post-footer"><img src="https://blogger.googleusercontent.com/tracker/902885274664531497-3231719521220233032?l=newlearninginstitute.blogspot.com" alt="" width="1" height="1" /></div></div></div></div><div class="field field-name-field-blog-topics field-type-taxonomy-term-reference field-label-above"><div class="field-label">Topics:&nbsp;</div><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><a href="/blog-topics/design-studio" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Design Studio</a></div><div class="field-item odd"><a href="/blog-topics/project-based-learning" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Project Based Learning</a></div><div class="field-item even"><a href="/blog-topics/mobile-learning" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Mobile Learning</a></div><div class="field-item odd"><a href="/blog-topics/digital-learning" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Digital Learning</a></div><div class="field-item even"><a href="/blog-topics/21st-century-skills" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">21st Century Skills</a></div></div></div>Thu, 19 May 2011 21:38:00 +0000Nancy Chou118 at http://newlearninginstitute.orghttp://newlearninginstitute.org/blog/digital-dispatch-biodiversity-quest-chicago-week-2#commentsBiodiversity Quest Program Launches in Chicagohttp://newlearninginstitute.org/blog/biodiversity-quest-program-launches-chicago <div class="field field-name-body field-type-text-with-summary field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even" property="content:encoded"><p><a href="http://4.bp.blogspot.com/-C7TXPveT7xk/Ta9vKQuBwBI/AAAAAAAABQY/gZ3jf55B0do/s1600/P1040476.JPG" onblur="try {parent.deselectBloggerImageGracefully();} catch(e) {}"><img src="http://4.bp.blogspot.com/-C7TXPveT7xk/Ta9vKQuBwBI/AAAAAAAABQY/gZ3jf55B0do/s400/P1040476.JPG" alt="" style="display: block; margin: 0px auto 10px; text-align: center; cursor: hand; width: 400px; height: 300px;" id="BLOGGER_PHOTO_ID_5597815083922210834" border="0" /></a></p><div> </div><div><em>Young visitors at a zoo run from exhibit to exhibit fascinated to see animals up close they've only seen in pictures or on TV. They pause to watch an animal for a minute or two and then are off to the next one. A placard or an encounter with a member of the zoo staff offers them some more information about the animals, but would it be possible to use mobile technology to help these young visitors learn even more by making connections between the exhibits they visit? </em></div><div> </div><div><a href="http://newlearninginstitute.org/">New Learning Institute</a> has partnered with several organizations to create the Biodiversity Quest program in Chicago to challenge young people to create mobile experiences, also known as quests, at <a href="http://www.lpzoo.org/">Lincoln Park Zoo</a>. Designed in collaboration with <a href="http://www.rootsandshoots.org/">Jane Goodall's Roots &amp; Shoots </a> and the <a href="http://www.arkive.org/">ARKive project</a>, these youth-designed quests will aim to educate other young visitors about endangered species, as well as show them how they can take action to help save the planet's threatened and endangered species.</div><div> </div><div>Biodiversity Quest is an eight-week afterschool program held at Bouchet Academy on the South Side of Chicago. Over the course of the workshops, sixth and seventh grade students from Bouchet will design the mobile quests to be played at Lincoln Park Zoo. The quests will each have a theme that leads other young visitors around the Zoo and helps them draw connections between exhibits. As an example, a group might design a quest that guides visitors to the exhibits of several species that share threatened status because of common threats to their habitats.</div><div> </div><div>NLI has worked closely with partners to design a program framework that provides an engaging, hands-on experience for the youth participants. Jane Goodall's Roots &amp; Shoots program helped structure the workshops with their <a href="http://www.rootsandshoots.org/aboutus/model">model</a> of moving young people from knowledge to compassion and into taking action, making a difference for people, animals, and the environment around them. The students in the Biodiversity Quest program begin by learning about biodiversity, conservation biology, and how species become threatened or endangered. They then connect their new awareness to their own interests by choosing species that they find most intriguing to use as the focus of their quests. Then the young participants take action by conducting research and including in their quest how a visitor to Lincoln Park Zoo could help the cause of a threatened or endangered species which may be found across the globe or as close as their own backyard.</div><div> </div><div><a href="http://www.arkive.org">ARKive</a> brings to the Biodiversity Quest a wealth of endangered species media, biological information and <a href="http://www.arkive.org/education/resources">educational resources</a>. This unique global initiative is leading the 'virtual' conservation effort by finding, sorting, cataloguing and digitizing threatened species multimedia into individual species profiles. ARKive.org is a user-friendly and searchable treasure trove of professional wildlife photos, videos, and biological information for over 12,000 threatened species (and still growing!). The participants in the Biodiversity Quest workshops will build their quests using ARKive biological information and will have access to over 80,000 stunning wildlife photos and videos from the ARKive website. Adding this rich media to the quests will allow the young designers to enhance the experience of zoo visitors.</div><div> </div><div>The Biodiversity Quest program launched in Chicago on March 22nd. Working in a collaborative environment, participants will engage in project-based learning that includes an authentic outcome : mobile quests that will be shared with other visitors at Lincoln Park Zoo. Over the next few months we will post Digital Dispatches describing the workshops and the progress the young participants are making on their quests. Check back for an update on their first two weeks soon!</div><div class="blogger-post-footer"><img src="https://blogger.googleusercontent.com/tracker/902885274664531497-2648119031854286599?l=newlearninginstitute.blogspot.com" alt="" width="1" height="1" /></div></div></div></div><div class="field field-name-field-blog-topics field-type-taxonomy-term-reference field-label-above"><div class="field-label">Topics:&nbsp;</div><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><a href="/blog-topics/technology-integration" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Technology Integration</a></div><div class="field-item odd"><a href="/blog-topics/nliatwork" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">NLIatWork</a></div><div class="field-item even"><a href="/blog-topics/digital-literacy" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Digital Literacy</a></div><div class="field-item odd"><a href="/blog-topics/design-studio" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Design Studio</a></div><div class="field-item even"><a href="/blog-topics/project-based-learning" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Project Based Learning</a></div><div class="field-item odd"><a href="/blog-topics/digital-learning" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Digital Learning</a></div><div class="field-item even"><a href="/blog-topics/21st-century-skills" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">21st Century Skills</a></div></div></div>Wed, 20 Apr 2011 21:15:00 +0000Nancy Chou122 at http://newlearninginstitute.orghttp://newlearninginstitute.org/blog/biodiversity-quest-program-launches-chicago#commentsDigital Dispatch: ARTLAB+ Video Program at the Hirshhorn Museumhttp://newlearninginstitute.org/blog/digital-dispatch-artlab-video-program-hirshhorn-museum <div class="field field-name-body field-type-text-with-summary field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even" property="content:encoded"><p><a href="http://www.flickr.com/photos/51820118@N03/5448503289/" title="artlab+videocollage1 by MLI-SI, on Flickr"><img src="http://farm6.static.flickr.com/5291/5448503289_2ced799960.jpg" alt="artlab+videocollage1" width="500" height="333" /></a></p><div> </div><p>The Smithsonian Institution <a href="http://hirshhorn.si.edu/">Hirshhorn Museum</a> kicked off their teen <a href="http://newlearninginstitute.blogspot.com/2010/11/design-studio-approach-mobile-learning.html">design studio programming</a> with the ARTLAB+ Video: City of Ruins workshop on January 24th. Ten teens are dedicated to being part of this teen design team. Their design challenge: to create a video series exhibition inspired by ruins in Washington, DC.</p><div><br /><div>Teens spent the first two weeks exploring the foundations of photography and videography through specific composition challenges.</div><br />Brianna took these two photos to illustrate how changing the camera angle can impact the way the subject is captured.</div><div> </div><p><a href="http://www.flickr.com/photos/51820118@N03/5448716859/" title="AnglesbyBrianna by MLI-SI, on Flickr"><img src="http://farm6.static.flickr.com/5299/5448716859_122e22c7dc.jpg" alt="AnglesbyBrianna" width="500" height="250" /></a></p><p> </p><div> </div><div>John took a first stab at camera moves, as shown in this short video. Don't miss his footage of Ardhy demonstrating "the truck."</div><div> </div><p><iframe src="http://player.vimeo.com/video/19987210" width="400" frameborder="0" height="300"></iframe></p><div>Stay tuned for more digital dispatches as the teen designers form production teams, plan video concepts, shoot and edit their work, then work together to create a museum exhibit displaying their video series.</div><div> </div><div><em>To see more images of teens at work check out the ARTLAB+ Video </em><a href="http://www.flickr.com/photos/51820118@N03/sets/72157625912112836/"><em>Flickr photo set</em></a><em>. </em></div><div><em>Learn more about other ARTLAB+ programming by following <a href="http://artlabplus.si.edu/">the ARTLAB+ blog</a>.</em></div><div class="blogger-post-footer"><img src="https://blogger.googleusercontent.com/tracker/902885274664531497-5675590304746765539?l=newlearninginstitute.blogspot.com" alt="" width="1" height="1" /></div></div></div></div><div class="field field-name-field-blog-topics field-type-taxonomy-term-reference field-label-above"><div class="field-label">Topics:&nbsp;</div><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><a href="/blog-topics/nliatwork" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">NLIatWork</a></div><div class="field-item odd"><a href="/blog-topics/design-studio" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Design Studio</a></div><div class="field-item even"><a href="/blog-topics/project-based-learning" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Project Based Learning</a></div><div class="field-item odd"><a href="/blog-topics/technology-education" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Technology Education</a></div><div class="field-item even"><a href="/blog-topics/museums" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Museums</a></div><div class="field-item odd"><a href="/blog-topics/digital-learning" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Digital Learning</a></div></div></div>Wed, 16 Feb 2011 22:02:00 +0000Tiffany McGettigan134 at http://newlearninginstitute.orghttp://newlearninginstitute.org/blog/digital-dispatch-artlab-video-program-hirshhorn-museum#commentsYouth as Curators: User-Created Content at Museumshttp://newlearninginstitute.org/blog/youth-curators-user-created-content-museums <div class="field field-name-body field-type-text-with-summary field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even" property="content:encoded"><p><a href="http://lh3.ggpht.com/_6Zln-7k5oag/TS9DSaEeofI/AAAAAAAAAFc/tRLfOnPYHIc/Monterey%20MLIPD050.jpg" onblur="try {parent.deselectBloggerImageGracefully();} catch(e) {}"><img src="http://lh3.ggpht.com/_6Zln-7k5oag/TS9DSaEeofI/AAAAAAAAAFc/tRLfOnPYHIc/Monterey%20MLIPD050.jpg" alt="" style="display: block; margin: 0px auto 10px; text-align: center; cursor: hand; width: 600px; height: 450px;" class="feature-top" border="0" /></a><br /><br />The idea of shifting the participation of museum visitors from internal (i.e., mental, or “look but don’t touch”) interaction to external (physical, hands-on) interaction isn’t a new one. Natural history museums have been doing this for years with exhibits that allow visitors to physically engage with selected artifacts. I remember going to <a href="http://www.coyoteptmuseum.org/">Coyote Point Museum</a> in San Mateo, CA as a child in the 1980s and touching a piece of raccoon pelt and taking my friends up on a dare to smell the skunk exhibit. We learned about the different kinds of fault structures by using the manipulables that mimicked dip-slip, thrust, strike-slip, and reverse faults. Being able to use a sense other than sight at the museum is why I remember these activities some 20 years later.<br /><br />But here’s what is new: The recent increase in the portability and ubiquity of digital media creation tools has helped push teaching and learning practice beyond basic internal and external interaction to a focus on actively making meaning. Now many museums and other cultural institutions are providing opportunities for visitors to record their reactions to exhibits and share them with subsequent visitors through audio, video, images, and social media. Bringing participatory culture into museums can help engage youth for whom this sort of interaction is integral to how they process their experiences – not only making these spaces more welcoming to young people, but also providing a platform for documenting the importance of these places to the community.<br /><br /><span style="font-weight: bold;">In Practice</span><br />Our work with <a href="http://www.newlearninginstitute.org/digital-media-programs/museum-programs/chicago-field-museum.html">Chicago’s The Field Museum</a> and the <a href="http://newlearninginstitute.blogspot.com/2010/11/visible-thinking-at-national-postal.html">Smithsonian Institution’s National Postal Museum</a> shows how two major museums are responding to the meaning-making trend by creating structured programs in partnership with local schools and organizations, giving youth a chance to own the issues and artifacts at these two institutions. When youth are provided an active way to engage with content and a platform that honors their voice and media preferences, they become invested in not only the content, but also in the space and in thinking critically about the knowledge they consume.<br /><br />Making meaning – and content – doesn’t only happen on site, or even in the classroom. While many museums have a strong online presence, sometimes including ways for site visitors to respond to content, there are some web spaces that allow people to create their own online exhibits. <a href="http://rhizome.org/">Rhizome</a> at New York’s New Museum of Contemporary Art is an arts organization that explores “emerging artistic practices that engage technology” and actively finds ways for people to participate in projects. Rhizome encourages their base to use their online archive, <a href="http://rhizome.org/art/">ArtBase</a>, to create <a href="http://rhizome.org/art/member-curated/">member-curated exhibits</a>. This gives people a chance to document their own aesthetic insights and inquiries, shifting power from a few art professionals to any interested consumer of art.<br /><br /><span style="font-weight: bold;">What’s Next?</span><br />Those cultural institutions that have been employing visitor-created content for some time are now wrestling with questions of <a href="http://uncatalogedmuseum.blogspot.com/2010/04/how-long-should-participation-last.html">what to do with the resulting physical artifacts</a> and how to store them. While easier to store, digital artifacts also raise questions of file showcasing and hosting – how will the pictures/movies/micro-blogs/etc. be shared? How long will these digital files sit on the museum’s servers before they are cleared away for new files; or will they be kept in perpetuity? And while showing these digital artifacts on a website is great, professional curators will need to continue to find ways to integrate user-created content into the physical exhibits if they wish to make visitor contributions seem meaningful and worth the contributors’ time and effort. It will be interesting to see how cultural institutions tackle these issues and move this practice along.<br /><br />Do you have any experiences with user-created content in museums or other cultural institutions? Please share them in the comments!<br /><br /><span style="font-weight: bold;">Additional Reading on User-Created Museum Content</span></p><p> </p><ul><ul><li><a href="http://spotlight.macfound.org/featured-stories/entry/art-mobs-strolling-moma-student-curators/">Art Mobs: Strolling MoMA with Student Curators on Your iPod.</a> Mac Montandon. Spotlight on Digital Media and Learning: MacArthur Foundation.</li></ul></ul><p> </p><ul><ul><li><a href="http://museumtwo.blogspot.com/2007/10/layer-on-for-long-haul-sustaining.html">Layer on for the Long Haul: Sustaining Visitor Co-created Experiences.</a> Nina Simon. Museum 2.0.</li></ul></ul><p> </p><ul><ul><li><a href="http://www.technologyinthearts.org/?p=1632">Planning for Engagement: Tech Strategy &amp; the Visitor Experience.</a> Thomas Hughes. Technology in the Arts: Exploring the intersection of arts management and online technology.</li></ul></ul><p> </p><ul><li><a href="http://flipthemedia.com/index.php/2010/01/to-curate-or-create-that-is-the-question/">To Curate or Create, That Is the Question.</a> Kathy Gill. MCDM: Flip the Media: A blog about the digital media revolution: University of Washington.</li></ul><div class="blogger-post-footer"><img src="https://blogger.googleusercontent.com/tracker/902885274664531497-9214435682763174391?l=newlearninginstitute.blogspot.com" alt="" width="1" height="1" /></div></div></div></div><div class="field field-name-field-blog-topics field-type-taxonomy-term-reference field-label-above"><div class="field-label">Topics:&nbsp;</div><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><a href="/blog-topics/technology-integration" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Technology Integration</a></div><div class="field-item odd"><a href="/blog-topics/social-networking" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Social Networking</a></div><div class="field-item even"><a href="/blog-topics/place-based-learning" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Place Based Learning</a></div><div class="field-item odd"><a href="/blog-topics/web-20" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Web 2.0</a></div><div class="field-item even"><a href="/blog-topics/project-based-learning" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Project Based Learning</a></div><div class="field-item odd"><a href="/blog-topics/community" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Community</a></div><div class="field-item even"><a href="/blog-topics/digital-learning" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Digital Learning</a></div></div></div>Thu, 13 Jan 2011 18:25:00 +0000Jennifer Dick142 at http://newlearninginstitute.orghttp://newlearninginstitute.org/blog/youth-curators-user-created-content-museums#commentsExperiential Learning: Career Academies and the Student Workplace Learning Experiencehttp://newlearninginstitute.org/blog/experiential-learning-career-academies-and-student-workplace-learning-experience <div class="field field-name-body field-type-text-with-summary field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even" property="content:encoded"><p><a href="http://lh3.ggpht.com/_6Zln-7k5oag/TQfGcpS1MkI/AAAAAAAAAEI/vOFO7wFDH8U/2537578858_2b824f4647_z.jpg" onblur="try {parent.deselectBloggerImageGracefully();} catch(e) {}"><img src="http://lh3.ggpht.com/_6Zln-7k5oag/TQfGcpS1MkI/AAAAAAAAAEI/vOFO7wFDH8U/2537578858_2b824f4647_z.jpg" alt="" style="display: block; margin: 0px auto 10px; text-align: center; cursor: hand; width: 600px; height: 400px;" class="feature-top" border="0" /></a></p><div style="text-align: left;"> </div><p>We’ve taken a look at how <a href="http://newlearninginstitute.blogspot.com/2010/12/real-world-learning-at-frida-kahlo-high.html">experiential learning at Frida Kahlo High School</a> is changing the way students learn in Los Angeles, CA to provide challenging, meaningful experiences for youth. Another experiential learning approach that educators can take is to integrate career-focused project-based learning and soft skills into the curriculum. The most comprehensive way to do this is through career academies, small learning communities that explicitly link core academic content to a career theme.<br /><br /><span style="font-weight: bold;">Career Academies</span><br />This idea of connecting rigorous academic content and classroom experience to a career field, and bringing youth and caring working professionals together, has proven a successful strategy for helping to keep young people engaged in their education.<br /><br />There are many different career academy models, but common elements include:</p><ul><li><span style="font-size: 13.3333px;"><strong>Small learning community:</strong> Students move from class to class in a cohort for at least part of the day and from year to year. The small learning community helps students feel more connected to school and be better supported by a team of adults.</span></li><li><span style="font-size: 13.3333px;"><strong>Career theme: </strong>All academy teachers use the career theme as the lens through which to view their academic content. Students are better able to understand why academic content is relevant to them and applicable to their options in the future.</span></li><li><span style="font-size: 13.3333px;"><strong>Industry partnerships</strong>: It’s essential for a career academy to have relationships with local employers in their career theme to help keep students focused on life after high school.</span></li></ul><p> </p><p><span style="font-weight: bold;">Learning in the Real World</span><br />Many career academies have some form of workplace learning experience built into their program. Connect with local businesses and professionals in fields and careers that interest your youth and in those that young people may not even know exist, such as project management.<br /><br />While internships are what tend to spring to mind when first considering work-based learning, there are other, less intensive options available to educators who want to expose their youth to the world of work beyond entry level. Consider finding industry professionals to:</p><p> </p><ul><li><span style="font-size: 13.3333px;">Mentor or e-mentor students</span></li><li><span style="font-size: 13.3333px;">Be a class guest speaker</span></li><li><span style="font-size: 13.3333px;">Serve on a student project evaluation panel</span></li><li><span style="font-size: 13.3333px;">Provide job-shadowing opportunities </span></li><li><span style="font-size: 13.3333px;">Provide internship experiences</span></li></ul><p><br /><br /></p><p><span style="font-weight: bold;">Gold Standards for High School Internships</span><a href="http://www.blogger.com/www.naf.org">The National Academy Foundation (NAF)</a> has been helping schools across the country develop effective academy programs for over 20 years. NAF has established a compensated summer internship between the junior and senior years, which is a key feature of their model. Developed by a task force comprised of educators, industry representatives, and thought leaders, the recently released report <a href="http://naf.org/internship-gold-standards">“Preparing Youth for Life: the Gold Standards for High School Internships”</a> seeks to codify ten key standards that describe the differences between a job and an internship and explore what policies need to exist to make such programs possible. This report can serve as a springboard for conversations with your team at school, industry partners, and school district personnel.<br /><br />What is your experience with high school internships and work-based learning engagements? Tell us in the comments section!<br /><br /><span style="font-weight: bold;">Additional Reading on Career Academies and High School Student Internships</span></p><p><br /><br /></p><ul><li><a href="http://www.mdrc.org/publications/41/full.pdf">Career Academies: Impacts on Students’ Engagement and Performance in High School.</a> James J. Kemple and Jason C. Snipes. MDRC.org. (2000)</li><li><a href="http://www.mdrc.org/publications/366/overview.html">Career Academies: Impacts on Labor Market Outcomes and Educational Attainment.</a> James J. Kemple and Judith Scott-Clayton. MDRC.org. (2004)</li><li><a href="http://casn.berkeley.edu/index.php">Career Academy Support Network (CASN).</a></li><li><a href="http://www.acteonline.org/uploadedFiles/About_ACTE/files/Career%20Academies%20Policy%20Paper,%2010.15.09%202x.pdf">High School Career Academies: A 40-Year Proven Model for Improving College and Career Readiness.</a> Betsy Brand. ACTE Online. (2009)</li></ul><div class="blogger-post-footer"><img src="https://blogger.googleusercontent.com/tracker/902885274664531497-3115260631823635720?l=newlearninginstitute.blogspot.com" alt="" width="1" height="1" /></div></div></div></div><div class="field field-name-field-blog-topics field-type-taxonomy-term-reference field-label-above"><div class="field-label">Topics:&nbsp;</div><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><a href="/blog-topics/work-based-learning" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Work-based Learning</a></div><div class="field-item odd"><a href="/blog-topics/best-practices" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Best Practices</a></div><div class="field-item even"><a href="/blog-topics/project-based-learning" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Project Based Learning</a></div><div class="field-item odd"><a href="/blog-topics/21st-century-skills" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">21st Century Skills</a></div></div></div>Tue, 14 Dec 2010 19:07:00 +0000Jennifer Dick150 at http://newlearninginstitute.orghttp://newlearninginstitute.org/blog/experiential-learning-career-academies-and-student-workplace-learning-experience#commentsReal-World Learning at Frida Kahlo High Schoolhttp://newlearninginstitute.org/blog/real-world-learning-frida-kahlo-high-school <div class="field field-name-body field-type-text-with-summary field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even" property="content:encoded"><blockquote>"Certain things capture your eye, but pursue only those that capture your heart." ~Old Native American saying</blockquote><p>Real-world learning allows students to learn skills they will use in the “real world” once they graduate. <a href="http://www.bigpicture.org/2010/10/taking-school-into-the-real-world-with-big-picture-learning/">Big Picture Learning schools</a> recognize that students have individual interests that, if honed, enhance their learning. In order to both develop these interests and learn “real-world” skills, students complete an internship as part of their studies.<br /> </p><blockquote>“The projects students do serve two purposes. [Each] must be an authentic project that serves the internship site, and then will also be embedded with some academic learning that students need to demonstrate.”</blockquote><p> </p><p><iframe src="http://www.youtube.com/embed/J6pvzhARGrw?fs=1" width="600" frameborder="0" height="344"></iframe></p><p> </p><p>Clarence Wells, a student at MetWest (a Big Picture Learning school in Oakland, CA), discusses the benefits of learning in the real world and the important skills gained as a result of his experiences.</p><p><strong>Fostering Digital Youth Leaders</strong><br />Last spring, students at another Big Picture school, <a href="http://fkhs.org/big.html">Frida Kahlo High</a> in South Los Angeles, met regularly as part of a personalized digital media program called “<a href="http://newlearninginstitute.blogspot.com/2010/11/community-and-identity-at-frida-kahlo.html">Day in the Life</a>.” The Day in the Life Digital Narrative Project provided students with the opportunity to play the role of “mobile journalist,” using mobile devices and digital video production as tools to tell their story.<br /><br />This spring, a new “Digital Youth Leaders” program, offered in collaboration with staff from the New Learning Institute and Alas Media, will give Frida Kahlo students an opportunity to apply the skills learned from Day in the Life to a real-world context – all the while giving back to their community. By collaborating with their peers and educators, the students will develop a digital media–based curriculum for nearby Nightingale Middle School.<br /><br /><br /><strong>Learning in the Real World</strong><br />Through the Digital Youth Leaders program, Frida Kahlo’s students are able to learn experientially. Experiential learning, or “learning by doing,” refers to the concept that students can learn meaningfully through direct experiences. <a href="http://www.learning-theories.com/experiential-learning-kolb.html">David A. Kolb’s experiential learning theory</a> components (1976; 1981; 1984) map nicely to the Digital Youth Leaders program.</p><p><br /><br /></p><ul><li>Concrete experience (or “DO”) – As interns, students will work in pairs and trios; each pair and trio will work with a designated teacher at Nightingale Middle School to design, plan, and implement a digital media–based project in his/her classroom. Student teams will continue to provide planning and technical support throughout the implementation stage of the program.</li><li>Reflective observation (or “OBSERVE”) – Frida Kahlo students will document their experience on the social learning network.</li><li>Abstract conceptualization (or “THINK”) – Students will conceptualize their experiences on the social learning network.</li><li>Active experimentation (or “PLAN”) – Interns and teachers will work together to implement the curriculum in the classroom. Frida Kahlo interns will provide technical support to Nightingale MS teachers and students.</li></ul><p> </p><p>For the students’ final projects, they will connect their learning to the world outside the classroom. When the program starts this spring, we will ask students to talk with us about their experiences.<br /><br /><strong>Additional Resources on Real-World Learning:</strong></p><ul><li><a href="http://casn.berkeley.edu/resource_files/Proven_Strategy_2-25-1010-03-12-04-27-01.pdf">Career Academies: A Proven Strategy to Prepare High School Students for College and Careers</a></li><li><a href="http://www.bigpicture.org/2010/10/taking-school-into-the-real-world-with-big-picture-learning/">Taking School into the Real World with Big Picture Learning</a></li><li><a href="http://www.bigpicture.org/2010/09/the-rigors-and-rewards/">The Rigors and Rewards of Internships</a></li></ul><div class="blogger-post-footer"><img src="https://blogger.googleusercontent.com/tracker/902885274664531497-652926877227913081?l=newlearninginstitute.blogspot.com" alt="" width="1" height="1" /></div></div></div></div><div class="field field-name-field-blog-topics field-type-taxonomy-term-reference field-label-above"><div class="field-label">Topics:&nbsp;</div><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><a href="/blog-topics/social-networking" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Social Networking</a></div><div class="field-item odd"><a href="/blog-topics/nliatwork" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">NLIatWork</a></div><div class="field-item even"><a href="/blog-topics/work-based-learning" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Work-based Learning</a></div><div class="field-item odd"><a href="/blog-topics/project-based-learning" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Project Based Learning</a></div><div class="field-item even"><a href="/blog-topics/digital-learning" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Digital Learning</a></div></div></div>Wed, 08 Dec 2010 23:05:00 +0000Sarah Davis152 at http://newlearninginstitute.orghttp://newlearninginstitute.org/blog/real-world-learning-frida-kahlo-high-school#comments