New Learning Institute - Librarieshttp://newlearninginstitute.org/blog-topics/libraries enNew Media and the Chicago Public Library: Interview with Mary Dempsey, Part IIhttp://newlearninginstitute.org/blog/new-media-and-chicago-public-library-interview-mary-dempsey-part-ii <div class="field field-name-body field-type-text-with-summary field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even" property="content:encoded"><p><a href="http://2.bp.blogspot.com/-Rd63LsxThls/Td_7NlSOxII/AAAAAAAABeM/T7Dgsimoguw/s1600/CPL_amercy" onblur="try {parent.deselectBloggerImageGracefully();} catch(e) {}"><img src="http://2.bp.blogspot.com/-Rd63LsxThls/Td_7NlSOxII/AAAAAAAABeM/T7Dgsimoguw/s1600/CPL_amercy" alt="" border="0" style="display: block; margin: 0px auto 10px; text-align: center; cursor: hand;" class="feature-top" id="BLOGGER_PHOTO_ID_5611479871492375682" /></a></p><div><p><em>This post is part of a series of interviews highlighting leaders in the field of New Learning (what we call “NLI at Inquiry”). <a href="http://newlearninginstitute.blogspot.com/2011/05/new-media-and-chicago-public-library.html">Recently, we interviewed Chicago Public Library Commissioner Mary Dempsey</a> on subjects including how the library has reshaped the city, new media’s role in the library, and her thoughts on the future of urban libraries. Here, in Part II of the interview, she discusses the ways that CPL’s new media learning center, YOUmedia, meets the needs of youth in Chicago and her thoughts on how urban libraries will evolve to meet students’ needs in the future.</em></p><p><em>Listen to the full interview here:</em></p><div><br /><em><object id="pcm_player_episode47331" style="height: 110px;" width="600" height="110px" data="http://podcastmachine.com/swf/player.swf" type="application/x-shockwave-flash"><param name="allowFullScreen" value="true" /><param name="allowScriptAccess" value="always" /><param name="quality" value="high" /><param name="wmode" value="transparent" /><param name="flashvars" value="file=http://podcastmachine.com/podcasts/8746/episodes/47331.json&amp;width=650&amp;height=111&amp;skin=http://podcastmachine.com/swf/skin_pcm1.swf&amp;fullscreen=true&amp;bgcolor=#000000&amp;playlist=bottom&amp;subscribebutton=false&amp;downloadbutton=false&amp;playlistcolumns=1&amp;playlistrows=1&amp;autostart=false&amp;playlistsize=80" /><param name="src" value="http://podcastmachine.com/swf/player.swf" /><param name="allowfullscreen" value="true" /><param name="allowscriptaccess" value="always" /><param name="pluginspage" value="http://www.macromedia.com/go/getflashplayer" /></object></em></div></div><p><strong><!--break--></strong><strong>Commissioner Dempsey, what specific needs is the YOUmedia center meeting for Chicago's youth?</strong></p><p>It’s a place for youth to come and feel comfortable and welcome. We don’t even advertise it. But through the word of mouth and their whole social network, it’s out there dramatically. I would say 50% of the kids who are part of YOUmedia don’t physically show up there; they are in the social network, and they are talking with their peers, critiquing each other’s work, and enhancing their writing skills just through the social network – or they’re appearing in person every day, or once a week, or once every couple of weeks at YOUmedia. There are some kids who come every day after school faithfully. I guarantee these are not kids who would have normally come to a public library after school, but they see this as a place to spark their creativity, to feel safe, to do their homework, to work with their peers from other schools. We serve kids from high schools across the city: public, parochial, private schools… In any given day, you’ll see kids in ROTC uniforms working with kids dressed like hip-hop artists. In a normal school setting, those are two groups that may not necessarily mix. And you’ll see kids working beautifully together, because they’re coming together around interest-driven learning. It’s a project that excites them and they want to work on it together, whether it’s art, or science, or technology, or poetry. We’re seeing them – without any difficulty at all – kids from different high schools talking to each other, working together; different age groups talking together and working together. There are none of the tensions that they might be expected to emulate in the outside world; none of that is brought into the library. So they see the library in a whole new light as a place that is really engaging their brain, which we love.</p><p><strong>How do you envision the future of urban libraries?</strong></p><p>I envision the future of urban libraries as very bright, because I think urban libraries understand that, in order to continue to be that place of lifelong learning and information literacy for the people of our cities, we have to stay ahead of the technology curve, we have to embrace new ideas; but we don’t have to just willy-nilly embrace any technology. We have to say, “How does this serve our mission?” In our case, YOUmedia worked for us because it was something that we fashioned together, that we created together. We brought the print, the book collections in with the technology, mentors, and librarians. I see that as the future. I see urban libraries as continuing to be those very important, strong community anchors that really provide a higher quality of life for families, for children, for small business owners, for seniors in every neighborhood of our city. It’s one of the reasons why Mayor Daley made it a point to build 59 new libraries in his 22 years in office. And it’s why Mayor Emanuel [the new incumbent] is very interested in what we are doing, where we’re building, and how we’re using digital learning to continue to enhance our mission. We will always have print, and we will always have technology – and the balance will be something that we’ll constantly work on – but we know there’s nothing wrong with embracing both of those formats in order to provide better access for what people need, whether it’s fiction, or nonfiction, or movies, or music, or research, or their own content that they generate themselves using our technology – this is all part of lifelong learning; it’s all part of quality of life; it’s all part of an appreciation for the people that live in the city by the government that helps support them.</p><p><strong>Special Thanks</strong></p><p>We’d like to extend a special thanks to Chicago Public Library Commissioner Mary Dempsey for taking the time to talk with us.</p><p><strong>Additional resources on Chicago Public Library, YOUmedia, and urban libraries:</strong></p><ul><li><a href="http://www.chipublib.org/">Chicago Public Library</a></li><li><a href="http://www.chipublib.org/eventsprog/programs/onebook_onechgo.php">One Book, One Chicago</a></li><li><a href="http://youmediachicago.org/">YOUmedia</a></li><li><a href="http://youmediachicago.org/24-one-book-one-chicago/pages/61-overview">YOUmedia’s One Book, One Chicago workshops</a></li><li><a href="http://urbanlibraries.org/">Urban Libraries Council</a></li></ul><div class="blogger-post-footer"><img src="https://blogger.googleusercontent.com/tracker/902885274664531497-7773062734534394213?l=newlearninginstitute.blogspot.com" alt="" width="1" height="1" /></div></div></div></div><div class="field field-name-field-blog-topics field-type-taxonomy-term-reference field-label-above"><div class="field-label">Topics:&nbsp;</div><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><a href="/blog-topics/libraries" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Libraries</a></div><div class="field-item odd"><a href="/blog_topics/leaders/index.html" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Leaders</a></div><div class="field-item even"><a href="/blog-topics/interview" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Interview</a></div><div class="field-item odd"><a href="/blog-topics/project-based-learning" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Project Based Learning</a></div><div class="field-item even"><a href="/blog-topics/nliatinquiry" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">NLIatInquiry</a></div><div class="field-item odd"><a href="/blog-topics/community" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Community</a></div><div class="field-item even"><a href="/blog-topics/digital-learning" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Digital Learning</a></div></div></div>Tue, 31 May 2011 18:52:00 +0000Sarah Davis116 at http://newlearninginstitute.orghttp://newlearninginstitute.org/blog/new-media-and-chicago-public-library-interview-mary-dempsey-part-ii#commentsNew Media and the Chicago Public Library: Interview with Mary Dempsey, Part I.http://newlearninginstitute.org/blog/new-media-and-chicago-public-library-interview-mary-dempsey-part-i <div class="field field-name-body field-type-text-with-summary field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even" property="content:encoded"><p><a href="http://2.bp.blogspot.com/-Rd63LsxThls/Td_7NlSOxII/AAAAAAAABeM/T7Dgsimoguw/s1600/CPL_amercy" onblur="try {parent.deselectBloggerImageGracefully();} catch(e) {}"><img src="http://2.bp.blogspot.com/-Rd63LsxThls/Td_7NlSOxII/AAAAAAAABeM/T7Dgsimoguw/s1600/CPL_amercy" alt="" style="display: block; margin: 0px auto 10px; text-align: center; cursor: hand;" class="feature-top" id="BLOGGER_PHOTO_ID_5611479871492375682" border="0" /></a></p><div> </div><div><em><em>This post is part of a series of interviews highlighting leaders in the field of New Learning (what we call “NLI at Inquiry”). Recently, we interviewed Chicago Public Library Commissioner Mary Dempsey on subjects including how the library has reshaped the city, new media’s role in the library, and her thoughts on the future of urban libraries. Here, in Part I of the interview, she discusses how the Chicago Public Library has impacted the city and urban youth through their new media learning center, YOUmedia.</em></em></div><div> </div><div>Listen to the full interview here:</div><div><br /><object id="pcm_player_episode47331" style="height: 110px;" data="http://podcastmachine.com/swf/player.swf" type="application/x-shockwave-flash" width="600" height="110px"><param name="allowFullScreen" value="true" /><param name="allowScriptAccess" value="always" /><param name="quality" value="high" /><param name="wmode" value="transparent" /><param name="flashvars" value="file=http://podcastmachine.com/podcasts/8746/episodes/47331.json&amp;width=650&amp;height=111&amp;skin=http://podcastmachine.com/swf/skin_pcm1.swf&amp;fullscreen=true&amp;bgcolor=#000000&amp;playlist=bottom&amp;subscribebutton=false&amp;downloadbutton=false&amp;playlistcolumns=1&amp;playlistrows=1&amp;autostart=false&amp;playlistsize=80" /><param name="src" value="http://podcastmachine.com/swf/player.swf" /><param name="allowfullscreen" value="true" /><param name="allowscriptaccess" value="always" /><param name="pluginspage" value="http://www.macromedia.com/go/getflashplayer" /></object><p><a href="http://3.bp.blogspot.com/-CJr2-2YwHJo/Td_5dYV8tBI/AAAAAAAABeE/Js_GuI6mzLc/s1600/MDempseyHeadshot.jpg" onblur="try {parent.deselectBloggerImageGracefully();} catch(e) {}"><img src="http://3.bp.blogspot.com/-CJr2-2YwHJo/Td_5dYV8tBI/AAAAAAAABeE/Js_GuI6mzLc/s320/MDempseyHeadshot.jpg" alt="" style="float: left; margin: 0 10px 10px 0; cursor: hand; width: 214px; height: 320px;" id="BLOGGER_PHOTO_ID_5611477943872959506" border="0" /></a>Mary Dempsey has served as Commissioner of the Chicago Public Library since 1994, when she was appointed to the position by Mayor Richard M. Daley. Dempsey was reappointed to continue as library commissioner by incoming Mayor Rahm Emanuel in May 2011. The Library is comprised of more than 1,100 employees in over 75 neighborhood locations. Under her direction, 44 new libraries have been constructed, 10 of which are LEED (green building) certified. Starting in 2009, construction on the first of 16 additional libraries began. Two new libraries opened in 2010, and four will open in 2011. Also under her direction, all libraries have been equipped with state-of-the-art technology, including free desktop and WiFi access to the Internet and access to more than 80 online databases, in addition to offering rich book collections and innovative reading and educational programs. The Chicago Public Library has successfully concluded its second five-year strategic plan, <strong>CPL 2010,</strong> and begins its next strategic planning effort in 2011.<strong> </strong>Dempsey holds a B.A. from St. Mary’s University, an M.L.S. from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, and a J.D. from DePaul University. She serves as Chair of the Board of Trustees of DePaul University and is a past Chair of the Urban Libraries Council.</p><p class="p1"><strong>Commissioner Dempsey, how has the Chicago Public Library reshaped the city?</strong></p><p class="p1">In many ways, large and small. We have, under Mayor Daley in his 22 years as mayor, built 59 new libraries. Those have been in neighborhoods where either we had no presence at all, or we had very small storefront presence in a couple of locations... In some neighborhoods, we acquired liquor stores, derelict buildings, or motels where bad things happened during all hours. By tearing them down and building a brand-new, beautiful multimillion-dollar branch library, we brought not only the resources of the library to the neighborhood – books, technology, trained professional librarians – but just an overall change in quality of life… We’ve seen it transform neighborhood after neighborhood … [and] how that has made people very proud of their neighborhood and really has helped them tremendously.</p><p class="p1"><strong>What is the role that new media has played in adding to the success of the Chicago Public Library?</strong></p><p class="p1"><a href="http://youmediachicago.org/">YOUmedia</a> has been so exciting for us because it really has validated for us that libraries can be the central node on the learning network where teens, youth – and even adults, we think, eventually; but certainly now we know teens – can come together around interest-driven learning and can feel very welcomed in a public library. We never wanted to just put computer games out there and say, “Have at it.” What we wanted was content and context – and that’s what YOUmedia brings. It brings a context of: You like technology? That’s great. What are you going to do with it? How do you use it? How do you use it to explore your world? To explore what you’re reading? To explore what you want to learn in school; or what you’re not learning in school but want to learn anyway?… So, we’ve found some really exciting projects that have come out of the [student] teams in YOUmedia: even they [the students themselves] were stunned at the quality and the caliber of the work that they did, and the exploration that they did… They’re really and truly learning. We think YOUmedia is the future of learning.</p><p class="p1"><strong>Can you go into more detail about the exciting YOUmedia projects you mentioned?</strong></p><p class="p1">…Twice a year we offer a program called <a href="http://www.chipublib.org/eventsprog/programs/onebook_onechgo.php">One Book, One Chicago</a>. [The Chicago Public Library] will ask the entire city of Chicago to read the same book and discuss it. In YOUmedia, that means that teens read the book, talk about it together, and then use digital technology, music, art, poetry, multimedia, [and/or] mixed media to interpret what they read, whether it is Carl Smith’s book about urban planning in Chicago and reimagining their neighborhood…or Toni Morrison’s A Mercy … We had them work on our latest project, [featuring] <a href="http://www.neilgaiman.com/works/Books/Neverwhere/">Neverwhere by Neil Gaiman</a>, which was fantasy. The projects that came out of <a href="http://youmediachicago.org/24-one-book-one-chicago/pages/68-neverwhere-spring-2011">Neverwhere [workshops]</a> were, as you would imagine, exciting, unusual, and fantastic. But the projects that came out of <a href="http://youmediachicago.org/24-one-book-one-chicago/pages/65-a-mercy-fall-2010">A Mercy [workshops]</a> were so powerful, and so strong, and thoughtful. I was just talking to a friend of mine who, as an adult, said, “Gosh, Toni Morrison’s work is so hard to read, I almost need a teacher with me when I read it.” These teens read it, discussed it, lived it, and then created incredibly beautiful, honest, very raw pieces of poetry, art, and music related to what they read in A Mercy… When they’re tuned into something they want to do, they move into new realms by exploring it in multi dimensions with YOUmedia.</p><p class="p1"><strong>To be continued...</strong></p><p class="p1">How does the library meet the needs of urban students in an ever-changing new media environment? How will urban libraries change to accommodate students in the future?</p><p class="p1">Part II of our interview with Chicago Public Library Commissioner Mary Dempsey will focus on how YOUmedia brings diverse students together and her thoughts on the future of urban libraries<span class="s3">.</span></p><p class="p1"><strong>Additional resources on the Chicago Public Library, YOUmedia, and urban libraries:</strong></p><ul class="ul1"><li class="li1"><a href="http://www.chipublib.org/">Chicago Public Library</a></li><li class="li4"><span class="s6"><a href="http://www.chipublib.org/eventsprog/programs/onebook_onechgo.php">One Book, One Chicago</a> </span></li><li class="li4"><span class="s6"><a href="http://youmediachicago.org/">YOUmedia</a></span></li><li class="li1"><a href="http://youmediachicago.org/24-one-book-one-chicago/pages/61-overview">YOUmedia’s One Book, One Chicago workshops</a></li><li class="li1"><a href="http://urbanlibraries.org/">Urban Libraries Council</a></li></ul></div><div class="blogger-post-footer"><img src="https://blogger.googleusercontent.com/tracker/902885274664531497-3167328458624915862?l=newlearninginstitute.blogspot.com" alt="" width="1" height="1" /></div></div></div></div><div class="field field-name-field-blog-topics field-type-taxonomy-term-reference field-label-above"><div class="field-label">Topics:&nbsp;</div><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><a href="/blog-topics/libraries" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Libraries</a></div><div class="field-item odd"><a href="/blog_topics/leaders/index.html" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Leaders</a></div><div class="field-item even"><a href="/blog-topics/interview" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Interview</a></div><div class="field-item odd"><a href="/blog-topics/project-based-learning" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Project Based Learning</a></div><div class="field-item even"><a href="/blog-topics/nliatinquiry" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">NLIatInquiry</a></div><div class="field-item odd"><a href="/blog-topics/community" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Community</a></div><div class="field-item even"><a href="/blog-topics/digital-learning" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Digital Learning</a></div></div></div>Wed, 25 May 2011 16:43:00 +0000Sarah Davis117 at http://newlearninginstitute.orghttp://newlearninginstitute.org/blog/new-media-and-chicago-public-library-interview-mary-dempsey-part-i#comments