New Learning Institute - NLIatInquiryhttp://newlearninginstitute.org/blog-topics/nliatinquiry enNew Media and the Chicago Public Library: Interview with Mary Dempsey, Part IIhttp://newlearninginstitute.org/blog/new-media-and-chicago-public-library-interview-mary-dempsey-part-ii <div class="field field-name-body field-type-text-with-summary field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even" property="content:encoded"><p><a href="http://2.bp.blogspot.com/-Rd63LsxThls/Td_7NlSOxII/AAAAAAAABeM/T7Dgsimoguw/s1600/CPL_amercy" onblur="try {parent.deselectBloggerImageGracefully();} catch(e) {}"><img src="http://2.bp.blogspot.com/-Rd63LsxThls/Td_7NlSOxII/AAAAAAAABeM/T7Dgsimoguw/s1600/CPL_amercy" alt="" border="0" style="display: block; margin: 0px auto 10px; text-align: center; cursor: hand;" class="feature-top" id="BLOGGER_PHOTO_ID_5611479871492375682" /></a></p><div><p><em>This post is part of a series of interviews highlighting leaders in the field of New Learning (what we call “NLI at Inquiry”). <a href="http://newlearninginstitute.blogspot.com/2011/05/new-media-and-chicago-public-library.html">Recently, we interviewed Chicago Public Library Commissioner Mary Dempsey</a> on subjects including how the library has reshaped the city, new media’s role in the library, and her thoughts on the future of urban libraries. Here, in Part II of the interview, she discusses the ways that CPL’s new media learning center, YOUmedia, meets the needs of youth in Chicago and her thoughts on how urban libraries will evolve to meet students’ needs in the future.</em></p><p><em>Listen to the full interview here:</em></p><div><br /><em><object id="pcm_player_episode47331" style="height: 110px;" width="600" height="110px" data="http://podcastmachine.com/swf/player.swf" type="application/x-shockwave-flash"><param name="allowFullScreen" value="true" /><param name="allowScriptAccess" value="always" /><param name="quality" value="high" /><param name="wmode" value="transparent" /><param name="flashvars" value="file=http://podcastmachine.com/podcasts/8746/episodes/47331.json&amp;width=650&amp;height=111&amp;skin=http://podcastmachine.com/swf/skin_pcm1.swf&amp;fullscreen=true&amp;bgcolor=#000000&amp;playlist=bottom&amp;subscribebutton=false&amp;downloadbutton=false&amp;playlistcolumns=1&amp;playlistrows=1&amp;autostart=false&amp;playlistsize=80" /><param name="src" value="http://podcastmachine.com/swf/player.swf" /><param name="allowfullscreen" value="true" /><param name="allowscriptaccess" value="always" /><param name="pluginspage" value="http://www.macromedia.com/go/getflashplayer" /></object></em></div></div><p><strong><!--break--></strong><strong>Commissioner Dempsey, what specific needs is the YOUmedia center meeting for Chicago's youth?</strong></p><p>It’s a place for youth to come and feel comfortable and welcome. We don’t even advertise it. But through the word of mouth and their whole social network, it’s out there dramatically. I would say 50% of the kids who are part of YOUmedia don’t physically show up there; they are in the social network, and they are talking with their peers, critiquing each other’s work, and enhancing their writing skills just through the social network – or they’re appearing in person every day, or once a week, or once every couple of weeks at YOUmedia. There are some kids who come every day after school faithfully. I guarantee these are not kids who would have normally come to a public library after school, but they see this as a place to spark their creativity, to feel safe, to do their homework, to work with their peers from other schools. We serve kids from high schools across the city: public, parochial, private schools… In any given day, you’ll see kids in ROTC uniforms working with kids dressed like hip-hop artists. In a normal school setting, those are two groups that may not necessarily mix. And you’ll see kids working beautifully together, because they’re coming together around interest-driven learning. It’s a project that excites them and they want to work on it together, whether it’s art, or science, or technology, or poetry. We’re seeing them – without any difficulty at all – kids from different high schools talking to each other, working together; different age groups talking together and working together. There are none of the tensions that they might be expected to emulate in the outside world; none of that is brought into the library. So they see the library in a whole new light as a place that is really engaging their brain, which we love.</p><p><strong>How do you envision the future of urban libraries?</strong></p><p>I envision the future of urban libraries as very bright, because I think urban libraries understand that, in order to continue to be that place of lifelong learning and information literacy for the people of our cities, we have to stay ahead of the technology curve, we have to embrace new ideas; but we don’t have to just willy-nilly embrace any technology. We have to say, “How does this serve our mission?” In our case, YOUmedia worked for us because it was something that we fashioned together, that we created together. We brought the print, the book collections in with the technology, mentors, and librarians. I see that as the future. I see urban libraries as continuing to be those very important, strong community anchors that really provide a higher quality of life for families, for children, for small business owners, for seniors in every neighborhood of our city. It’s one of the reasons why Mayor Daley made it a point to build 59 new libraries in his 22 years in office. And it’s why Mayor Emanuel [the new incumbent] is very interested in what we are doing, where we’re building, and how we’re using digital learning to continue to enhance our mission. We will always have print, and we will always have technology – and the balance will be something that we’ll constantly work on – but we know there’s nothing wrong with embracing both of those formats in order to provide better access for what people need, whether it’s fiction, or nonfiction, or movies, or music, or research, or their own content that they generate themselves using our technology – this is all part of lifelong learning; it’s all part of quality of life; it’s all part of an appreciation for the people that live in the city by the government that helps support them.</p><p><strong>Special Thanks</strong></p><p>We’d like to extend a special thanks to Chicago Public Library Commissioner Mary Dempsey for taking the time to talk with us.</p><p><strong>Additional resources on Chicago Public Library, YOUmedia, and urban libraries:</strong></p><ul><li><a href="http://www.chipublib.org/">Chicago Public Library</a></li><li><a href="http://www.chipublib.org/eventsprog/programs/onebook_onechgo.php">One Book, One Chicago</a></li><li><a href="http://youmediachicago.org/">YOUmedia</a></li><li><a href="http://youmediachicago.org/24-one-book-one-chicago/pages/61-overview">YOUmedia’s One Book, One Chicago workshops</a></li><li><a href="http://urbanlibraries.org/">Urban Libraries Council</a></li></ul><div class="blogger-post-footer"><img src="https://blogger.googleusercontent.com/tracker/902885274664531497-7773062734534394213?l=newlearninginstitute.blogspot.com" alt="" width="1" height="1" /></div></div></div></div><div class="field field-name-field-blog-topics field-type-taxonomy-term-reference field-label-above"><div class="field-label">Topics:&nbsp;</div><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><a href="/blog-topics/libraries" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Libraries</a></div><div class="field-item odd"><a href="/blog_topics/leaders/index.html" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Leaders</a></div><div class="field-item even"><a href="/blog-topics/interview" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Interview</a></div><div class="field-item odd"><a href="/blog-topics/project-based-learning" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Project Based Learning</a></div><div class="field-item even"><a href="/blog-topics/nliatinquiry" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">NLIatInquiry</a></div><div class="field-item odd"><a href="/blog-topics/community" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Community</a></div><div class="field-item even"><a href="/blog-topics/digital-learning" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Digital Learning</a></div></div></div>Tue, 31 May 2011 18:52:00 +0000Sarah Davis116 at http://newlearninginstitute.orghttp://newlearninginstitute.org/blog/new-media-and-chicago-public-library-interview-mary-dempsey-part-ii#commentsNew Media and the Chicago Public Library: Interview with Mary Dempsey, Part I.http://newlearninginstitute.org/blog/new-media-and-chicago-public-library-interview-mary-dempsey-part-i <div class="field field-name-body field-type-text-with-summary field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even" property="content:encoded"><p><a href="http://2.bp.blogspot.com/-Rd63LsxThls/Td_7NlSOxII/AAAAAAAABeM/T7Dgsimoguw/s1600/CPL_amercy" onblur="try {parent.deselectBloggerImageGracefully();} catch(e) {}"><img src="http://2.bp.blogspot.com/-Rd63LsxThls/Td_7NlSOxII/AAAAAAAABeM/T7Dgsimoguw/s1600/CPL_amercy" alt="" style="display: block; margin: 0px auto 10px; text-align: center; cursor: hand;" class="feature-top" id="BLOGGER_PHOTO_ID_5611479871492375682" border="0" /></a></p><div> </div><div><em><em>This post is part of a series of interviews highlighting leaders in the field of New Learning (what we call “NLI at Inquiry”). Recently, we interviewed Chicago Public Library Commissioner Mary Dempsey on subjects including how the library has reshaped the city, new media’s role in the library, and her thoughts on the future of urban libraries. Here, in Part I of the interview, she discusses how the Chicago Public Library has impacted the city and urban youth through their new media learning center, YOUmedia.</em></em></div><div> </div><div>Listen to the full interview here:</div><div><br /><object id="pcm_player_episode47331" style="height: 110px;" data="http://podcastmachine.com/swf/player.swf" type="application/x-shockwave-flash" width="600" height="110px"><param name="allowFullScreen" value="true" /><param name="allowScriptAccess" value="always" /><param name="quality" value="high" /><param name="wmode" value="transparent" /><param name="flashvars" value="file=http://podcastmachine.com/podcasts/8746/episodes/47331.json&amp;width=650&amp;height=111&amp;skin=http://podcastmachine.com/swf/skin_pcm1.swf&amp;fullscreen=true&amp;bgcolor=#000000&amp;playlist=bottom&amp;subscribebutton=false&amp;downloadbutton=false&amp;playlistcolumns=1&amp;playlistrows=1&amp;autostart=false&amp;playlistsize=80" /><param name="src" value="http://podcastmachine.com/swf/player.swf" /><param name="allowfullscreen" value="true" /><param name="allowscriptaccess" value="always" /><param name="pluginspage" value="http://www.macromedia.com/go/getflashplayer" /></object><p><a href="http://3.bp.blogspot.com/-CJr2-2YwHJo/Td_5dYV8tBI/AAAAAAAABeE/Js_GuI6mzLc/s1600/MDempseyHeadshot.jpg" onblur="try {parent.deselectBloggerImageGracefully();} catch(e) {}"><img src="http://3.bp.blogspot.com/-CJr2-2YwHJo/Td_5dYV8tBI/AAAAAAAABeE/Js_GuI6mzLc/s320/MDempseyHeadshot.jpg" alt="" style="float: left; margin: 0 10px 10px 0; cursor: hand; width: 214px; height: 320px;" id="BLOGGER_PHOTO_ID_5611477943872959506" border="0" /></a>Mary Dempsey has served as Commissioner of the Chicago Public Library since 1994, when she was appointed to the position by Mayor Richard M. Daley. Dempsey was reappointed to continue as library commissioner by incoming Mayor Rahm Emanuel in May 2011. The Library is comprised of more than 1,100 employees in over 75 neighborhood locations. Under her direction, 44 new libraries have been constructed, 10 of which are LEED (green building) certified. Starting in 2009, construction on the first of 16 additional libraries began. Two new libraries opened in 2010, and four will open in 2011. Also under her direction, all libraries have been equipped with state-of-the-art technology, including free desktop and WiFi access to the Internet and access to more than 80 online databases, in addition to offering rich book collections and innovative reading and educational programs. The Chicago Public Library has successfully concluded its second five-year strategic plan, <strong>CPL 2010,</strong> and begins its next strategic planning effort in 2011.<strong> </strong>Dempsey holds a B.A. from St. Mary’s University, an M.L.S. from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, and a J.D. from DePaul University. She serves as Chair of the Board of Trustees of DePaul University and is a past Chair of the Urban Libraries Council.</p><p class="p1"><strong>Commissioner Dempsey, how has the Chicago Public Library reshaped the city?</strong></p><p class="p1">In many ways, large and small. We have, under Mayor Daley in his 22 years as mayor, built 59 new libraries. Those have been in neighborhoods where either we had no presence at all, or we had very small storefront presence in a couple of locations... In some neighborhoods, we acquired liquor stores, derelict buildings, or motels where bad things happened during all hours. By tearing them down and building a brand-new, beautiful multimillion-dollar branch library, we brought not only the resources of the library to the neighborhood – books, technology, trained professional librarians – but just an overall change in quality of life… We’ve seen it transform neighborhood after neighborhood … [and] how that has made people very proud of their neighborhood and really has helped them tremendously.</p><p class="p1"><strong>What is the role that new media has played in adding to the success of the Chicago Public Library?</strong></p><p class="p1"><a href="http://youmediachicago.org/">YOUmedia</a> has been so exciting for us because it really has validated for us that libraries can be the central node on the learning network where teens, youth – and even adults, we think, eventually; but certainly now we know teens – can come together around interest-driven learning and can feel very welcomed in a public library. We never wanted to just put computer games out there and say, “Have at it.” What we wanted was content and context – and that’s what YOUmedia brings. It brings a context of: You like technology? That’s great. What are you going to do with it? How do you use it? How do you use it to explore your world? To explore what you’re reading? To explore what you want to learn in school; or what you’re not learning in school but want to learn anyway?… So, we’ve found some really exciting projects that have come out of the [student] teams in YOUmedia: even they [the students themselves] were stunned at the quality and the caliber of the work that they did, and the exploration that they did… They’re really and truly learning. We think YOUmedia is the future of learning.</p><p class="p1"><strong>Can you go into more detail about the exciting YOUmedia projects you mentioned?</strong></p><p class="p1">…Twice a year we offer a program called <a href="http://www.chipublib.org/eventsprog/programs/onebook_onechgo.php">One Book, One Chicago</a>. [The Chicago Public Library] will ask the entire city of Chicago to read the same book and discuss it. In YOUmedia, that means that teens read the book, talk about it together, and then use digital technology, music, art, poetry, multimedia, [and/or] mixed media to interpret what they read, whether it is Carl Smith’s book about urban planning in Chicago and reimagining their neighborhood…or Toni Morrison’s A Mercy … We had them work on our latest project, [featuring] <a href="http://www.neilgaiman.com/works/Books/Neverwhere/">Neverwhere by Neil Gaiman</a>, which was fantasy. The projects that came out of <a href="http://youmediachicago.org/24-one-book-one-chicago/pages/68-neverwhere-spring-2011">Neverwhere [workshops]</a> were, as you would imagine, exciting, unusual, and fantastic. But the projects that came out of <a href="http://youmediachicago.org/24-one-book-one-chicago/pages/65-a-mercy-fall-2010">A Mercy [workshops]</a> were so powerful, and so strong, and thoughtful. I was just talking to a friend of mine who, as an adult, said, “Gosh, Toni Morrison’s work is so hard to read, I almost need a teacher with me when I read it.” These teens read it, discussed it, lived it, and then created incredibly beautiful, honest, very raw pieces of poetry, art, and music related to what they read in A Mercy… When they’re tuned into something they want to do, they move into new realms by exploring it in multi dimensions with YOUmedia.</p><p class="p1"><strong>To be continued...</strong></p><p class="p1">How does the library meet the needs of urban students in an ever-changing new media environment? How will urban libraries change to accommodate students in the future?</p><p class="p1">Part II of our interview with Chicago Public Library Commissioner Mary Dempsey will focus on how YOUmedia brings diverse students together and her thoughts on the future of urban libraries<span class="s3">.</span></p><p class="p1"><strong>Additional resources on the Chicago Public Library, YOUmedia, and urban libraries:</strong></p><ul class="ul1"><li class="li1"><a href="http://www.chipublib.org/">Chicago Public Library</a></li><li class="li4"><span class="s6"><a href="http://www.chipublib.org/eventsprog/programs/onebook_onechgo.php">One Book, One Chicago</a> </span></li><li class="li4"><span class="s6"><a href="http://youmediachicago.org/">YOUmedia</a></span></li><li class="li1"><a href="http://youmediachicago.org/24-one-book-one-chicago/pages/61-overview">YOUmedia’s One Book, One Chicago workshops</a></li><li class="li1"><a href="http://urbanlibraries.org/">Urban Libraries Council</a></li></ul></div><div class="blogger-post-footer"><img src="https://blogger.googleusercontent.com/tracker/902885274664531497-3167328458624915862?l=newlearninginstitute.blogspot.com" alt="" width="1" height="1" /></div></div></div></div><div class="field field-name-field-blog-topics field-type-taxonomy-term-reference field-label-above"><div class="field-label">Topics:&nbsp;</div><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><a href="/blog-topics/libraries" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Libraries</a></div><div class="field-item odd"><a href="/blog_topics/leaders/index.html" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Leaders</a></div><div class="field-item even"><a href="/blog-topics/interview" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Interview</a></div><div class="field-item odd"><a href="/blog-topics/project-based-learning" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Project Based Learning</a></div><div class="field-item even"><a href="/blog-topics/nliatinquiry" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">NLIatInquiry</a></div><div class="field-item odd"><a href="/blog-topics/community" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Community</a></div><div class="field-item even"><a href="/blog-topics/digital-learning" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Digital Learning</a></div></div></div>Wed, 25 May 2011 16:43:00 +0000Sarah Davis117 at http://newlearninginstitute.orghttp://newlearninginstitute.org/blog/new-media-and-chicago-public-library-interview-mary-dempsey-part-i#commentsThe Young and the Digital: Interview with S. Craig Watkins, Part IIIhttp://newlearninginstitute.org/blog/young-and-digital-interview-s-craig-watkins-part-iii <div class="field field-name-body field-type-text-with-summary field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even" property="content:encoded"><p><a href="http://3.bp.blogspot.com/-5Yl_z9SYIE8/TW7X91d3qiI/AAAAAAAABdY/rKhARX03ozM/s1600/digital%2Byouth.jpg" onblur="try {parent.deselectBloggerImageGracefully();} catch(e) {}"><img src="http://3.bp.blogspot.com/-5Yl_z9SYIE8/TW7X91d3qiI/AAAAAAAABdY/rKhARX03ozM/s1600/digital%2Byouth.jpg" style="display: block; margin: 0px auto 10px; text-align: center; cursor: pointer;" class="feature-top" /></a></p><p> </p><div><div><em>This post is part of a series of interviews highlighting leaders in the field of New Learning (what we call “NLI at Inquiry”). Recently, <a href="http://newlearninginstitute.blogspot.com/2011/02/young-and-digital-interview-with-s.html">we interviewed University of Texas at Austin Professor S. Craig Watkins</a> on subjects including his research, social media in different contexts, the participation gap, and the quality and consequences of young people’s media engagement. Here, in Part III of the interview, he discusses his thoughts on social media trends and youth engagement with social media in the future.</em><br /><br />Listen to the full interview here:</div><div style="font-weight: bold;"><br /><object id="pcm_player_episode41443" data="http://podcastmachine.com/swf/player.swf" type="application/x-shockwave-flash" width="600" height="111"><param name="allowFullScreen" value="true" /><param name="allowScriptAccess" value="always" /><param name="quality" value="high" /><param name="wmode" value="transparent" /><param name="flashvars" value="file=http://podcastmachine.com/podcasts/8746/episodes/41443.json&amp;width=600&amp;height=111&amp;skin=http://podcastmachine.com/swf/skin_pcm1.swf&amp;fullscreen=true&amp;bgcolor=#000000&amp;playlist=bottom&amp;subscribebutton=false&amp;downloadbutton=false&amp;playlistcolumns=1&amp;playlistrows=1&amp;autostart=false&amp;playlistsize=80" /><param name="src" value="http://podcastmachine.com/swf/player.swf" /><param name="allowfullscreen" value="true" /><param name="allowscriptaccess" value="always" /><param name="pluginspage" value="http://www.macromedia.com/go/getflashplayer" /></object></div></div><p> </p><p><strong>How would you characterize social networks in the future? As they relate to individuals of different backgrounds or gender? </strong></p><div><br /><div><div>I think in the future, social networks, and we are seeing evidence of this now – particularly if we think about online social networks, social networks that are maintained via platforms like Facebook or Tumblr or some other platform that is on the horizon if it’s not here already – that they will evolve into very complex systems. It will be interesting to see at what point people begin to prefer social networks that enable them to exercise a finer degree of control over their networks.</div><div> </div><div>What I mean by that is, for example, I was just having a conversation with a friend yesterday and he was saying why he didn’t like Facebook, or why he didn’t appreciate the fact that Facebook didn’t allow him to maintain the kinds of distinctions in his network that he appreciated and thought were important. For example, maybe his colleagues at work and the conversations he shares with them may be very unique or specific to that situation. Then there’s family. Then there may be friends he does a lot of recreational or social activities with. So it seems to me that at some point in the very near future people will be looking for social networks that allow them to really begin to manage, with a greater degree of precision, the different sub-networks that make up their larger social networks. That’s not only about privacy; it’s about complexity, the complexity of us as individuals, the different relationships we develop, the meaningful kinds of relationships and networks that make up our total selves, our total lives. And, to what degree will online tools and platforms be able to recognize that complexity?</div><div> </div><strong>How do you see trends of communication changing for young people?</strong></div><div> </div><div>…I never make the mistake of thinking that I totally get it, or that I totally understand young people and their motivation and their engagement with technology, because it is always in such a constant state of flux. I preface anything that I may say with that. But I do think it’s clear that what will be interesting, in terms of the youth population, is what I like to refer to as “trickle-down technology” and the ways in which particularly mobile media, and to some degree social media, are now trickling down to younger and younger children.</div><div> </div><div>It wasn’t that long ago when the idea of a middle schooler owning his or her own mobile phone was kind of a stretch, where most parents couldn’t wrap their head around that idea. Now, that is increasingly a fairly common experience in a growing number of households around this country. What we’re really beginning to see now is even younger and younger children below the middle school ages are beginning to request, demand, and ask for their own mobile devices – maybe it’s an iPod, in some cases maybe it’s a phone. In terms of youth and communication, clearly everything will pivot around mobile: their lives will pivot around mobile; their modes of communication will be mediated via mobile technologies.</div><div> </div><div>What I’m really intrigued by is the degree to which the age of adoption begins to get younger and younger. I can imagine in the very near future where kids in second, third, and fourth grade, for example, will have their own mobile phones. They already have their own mobile gaming platforms, their own mobile gaming and music devices; and you can expect that, in a very near, short period, even young children’s lives will be completely saturated with mobile media, applications, technologies, and modes of communication in ways that, just a few short years ago, would have been almost impossible for us to have imagined.</div><div> </div><div><strong>Special thanks</strong></div><div> </div><div>We’d like to extend a special thanks to Professor S. Craig Watkins for taking the time to talk with us.</div><div> </div><div><strong>Additional resources on Professor Watkins’ work, digital media, and learning:</strong><br /><ul><li><a href="http://www.theyoungandthedigital.com/">The Young and the Digital</a></li><li><a href="http://vimeo.com/14777251">DML Conference 2011: Designing Learning Futures (S. Craig Watkins)</a></li><li><a href="http://www.dmlcentral.net/conference2011">Digital Media and Learning Conference 2011 Website</a></li></ul></div></div><div class="blogger-post-footer"><img src="https://blogger.googleusercontent.com/tracker/902885274664531497-4483278289496818781?l=newlearninginstitute.blogspot.com" alt="" width="1" height="1" /></div></div></div></div><div class="field field-name-field-blog-topics field-type-taxonomy-term-reference field-label-above"><div class="field-label">Topics:&nbsp;</div><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><a href="/blog-topics/social-networking" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Social Networking</a></div><div class="field-item odd"><a href="/blog_topics/leaders/index.html" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Leaders</a></div><div class="field-item even"><a href="/blog-topics/interview" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Interview</a></div><div class="field-item odd"><a href="/blog_topics/research/index.html" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Research</a></div><div class="field-item even"><a href="/blog-topics/participation-gap" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Participation Gap</a></div><div class="field-item odd"><a href="/blog-topics/nliatinquiry" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">NLIatInquiry</a></div><div class="field-item even"><a href="/blog-topics/digital-learning" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Digital Learning</a></div></div></div>Wed, 02 Mar 2011 23:43:00 +0000Sarah Davis129 at http://newlearninginstitute.orghttp://newlearninginstitute.org/blog/young-and-digital-interview-s-craig-watkins-part-iii#commentsThe Young and the Digital: Interview with S. Craig Watkins, Part IIhttp://newlearninginstitute.org/blog/young-and-digital-interview-s-craig-watkins-part-ii <div class="field field-name-body field-type-text-with-summary field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even" property="content:encoded"><p><a href="http://3.bp.blogspot.com/-9DdU45kZinw/TW7UL2FbO3I/AAAAAAAABdQ/iPNKfg-hRPk/s1600/digital%2Byouth.jpg" onblur="try {parent.deselectBloggerImageGracefully();} catch(e) {}"><img src="http://3.bp.blogspot.com/-9DdU45kZinw/TW7UL2FbO3I/AAAAAAAABdQ/iPNKfg-hRPk/s1600/digital%2Byouth.jpg" alt="" style="display: block; margin: 0px auto 10px; text-align: center; cursor: hand;" class="feature-top" id="BLOGGER_PHOTO_ID_5579630288320543602" border="0" /></a></p><p> </p><div><div><em>This post is part of a series of interviews highlighting leaders in the field of New Learning (what we call “NLI at Inquiry”). Recently, <a href="http://newlearninginstitute.blogspot.com/2011/02/young-and-digital-interview-with-s.html">we interviewed University of Texas at Austin Professor S. Craig Watkins</a> on subjects including his research and his thoughts on the future of social media. Here, in Part II of the interview, he discusses the participation gap, social media in different contexts, and the quality and consequences of young people’s media engagement.</em></div><div style="font-weight: bold;"> </div></div><p><strong>Professor Watkins, please discuss the digital divide in the context of social networks. </strong></p><div><br /><div><div>My background and training is in the field of Sociology, so I bring those kinds of inclinations, those kinds of questions, those kinds of inquiry, into my investigation of digital media. I’m always interested in the context in which people are engaged with digital media – how factors such as gender, race, geography, class, and education impact the ways in which people participate in the social media universe.</div><div> </div><div>One of the things we pay close attention to throughout our research is how these markers of race and class do indeed influence what is happening in the digital world. There have been some amazing changes just within the last five to ten years. Ten years ago, there was a great concern about the digital divide – where it really began to establish itself as a formidable story about the technology-rich and technology poor divide; the technology haves and the technology have-nots. What has happened since then, over the last five to ten years, is a kind of a transformation of how we now think about technology and social inequality. Rather than thinking about it in terms of an access gap (those who have access to technology and those who do not have access to technology), we tend to now think about it in terms of the participation gap – that is, looking at the quality of engagement with technology, the quality of engagement with the Internet, the quality of engagement with mobile media platforms – because communities and populations that just five years ago were rarely, if ever, discussed or mentioned in debates and public conversations about technology are now very central to how technology is being adopted, how it’s being used, the kinds of innovations that are happening around technology.</div><div> </div><div>Just to give you one clear example: black and Latino youth are quite robust in terms of their engagement with social and mobile media. So there’s all kinds of empirical evidence and data that’s been coming out of the last four to five years that suggest black and Latino youth are much more actively involved than their white counterparts on social network sites; they’re much more robust in terms of how they’re engaged with mobile media; they’re doing a wider range of things with their mobile phones; there’s a lot of recent data that suggests they’re just as active, if not more active, on Twitter.</div><div> </div><div> </div><div>So it seems to me that, as everyday realities have changed around who is adopting technology, the context in which they’re adopting technology, and the ways in which technology matters in their lives, it’s really necessitated a different set of questions that we should be asking as it relates to the issue of technology and social inequality. It’s not so much that the issue of inequality and the kinds of issues of diversity that the digital divide narrative generated have necessarily been erased – but I do think that how we think about these issues needs to seriously be modified in relation to the kinds of cultural realities that are happening in the world today. We spend a lot of time trying to explore that area. I’m working with another team of researchers who have been funded by the MacArthur Foundation to look at young people, to look at how they’re creating these new kinds of informal learning ecologies, new modes of learning through technology. One of the key variables/sets of factors that we’ll be looking at [is] race, ethnicity, geography, class – how those things impact how different types of kids engage with technology in different ways.</div><div style="font-weight: bold;"> </div><div><strong>You mentioned that the way technology is adopted and used today is creating a different set of questions that people should be asking. Can you elaborate on that?</strong></div><div> </div><div><div>The questions ten years ago primarily pivoted around the issue of access: for example, how do we create more access to technology for low-income kids? How do we build spaces where kids can get access to computers, or where they can get access to the Internet? Those questions, though they aren’t completely erased from the conversation, they’re not nearly as significant as they were ten years ago. The questions today are more likely to be about the quality of engagement with technology – in other words, how do we create ecologies, spaces, and environments that encourage kids to expand how they think about the technology that they own?</div><div> </div><div>I mentioned, for example, that black and Latino youth are much more robust in terms of the range of activities that they participate in with mobile media. However, we are at a point now where we are beginning to think about mobile and social media as tools of empowerment and civic engagement, and as resources that kids can use to engage their communities, their lives, and the world around them. How do we begin to foster environments, create conversations, and create spaces that really encourage kids to see these tools – the tools that they have access to, the tools that they use, and in many cases the tools that they now own – in that way? So, the questions are not necessarily about access but about quality of engagement and participation, about how technology is actually being used, and what technology can possibly mean in people’s everyday lives.</div><div style="font-weight: bold;"> </div></div><div><strong>Can you describe the use of code-switching between different types of social networks – for example, switching between Myspace and Facebook? Do you see it happening in both kids of lower and higher socio-economic status? Why is it important? </strong></div><div> </div><div><div>[Currently], even among black and Latino youth, Facebook is clearly the preferred social network to use… Where I’ve talked about code-switching – and I’ve borrowed this from linguists and from urban sociologists of decades ago, who really try to grapple with the issue of social mobility and how, in particular, populations or individuals on the social and economic margins develop different modes of communication, different modes of personal expression, different mannerisms, different styles of expression – [I’ve looked at] how that can oftentimes stand in the way of their social mobility. It limits their opportunities for meaningful employment. It makes them less of a viable option for certain kinds of opportunities because of what researchers call “soft skills.” Soft skills are not necessarily those things that can be quantified, but those things that can be observed, in terms of mannerisms, self-presentation. Historically, researchers have argued – for example, for young African American men – that among the reasons that they find getting access to meaningful forms of employment difficult has to do with this belief amongst managers and employees that they don’t have those soft skills, in terms of how they express themselves via language, dress, their mannerisms.</div><div> </div><div>What I’ve argued is that if you look at the ways, for example, in which teenagers in general, but particularly black and Latino teens, and black and Latino males specifically, create, construct, and perform their identities via social network sites – first primarily Myspace but now increasingly via Facebook and Twitter – these issues really continue to come into play in some ways that are quite new and distinct today.</div><div> </div><div>This is all connected to this growing recognition that how we behave in the social media world has consequences for our lives outside of that space. We know that teachers, admissions offices, and employees now look at, evaluate, and make judgments about people based on the things that they say and do in their social network profiles. So, part of what I’ve talked about is helping to educate young and Latino youth about the consequences of participation in social media; specifically, the consequences of the kinds of pictures that they post, conversations that they participate in, and things that they use to represent themselves, their identities, and the things that they value. It’s a challenging issue, but it’s one that increasingly needs to be addressed effectively in many ways.</div><div style="font-weight: bold;"> </div><strong>To be continued...</strong></div><div> </div><div><div>What will social networks look like in the future? For youth specifically?</div><div> </div><div>Next time we will publish Part III of our interview with Professor Watkins, focusing on his thoughts on future social media trends.</div><div style="font-weight: bold;"> </div></div><div><strong>Additional resources on Professor Watkins’ work, digital media, and learning:</strong><br /><ul><li><a href="http://www.theyoungandthedigital.com/">The Young and the Digital</a></li><li><a href="http://vimeo.com/14777251">DML Conference 2011: Designing Learning Futures (S. Craig Watkins)</a></li><li><a href="http://www.dmlcentral.net/conference2011">Digital Media and Learning Conference 2011 Website</a></li></ul></div></div></div><div class="blogger-post-footer"><img src="https://blogger.googleusercontent.com/tracker/902885274664531497-4216937849499013315?l=newlearninginstitute.blogspot.com" alt="" width="1" height="1" /></div></div></div></div><div class="field field-name-field-blog-topics field-type-taxonomy-term-reference field-label-above"><div class="field-label">Topics:&nbsp;</div><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><a href="/blog-topics/social-networking" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Social Networking</a></div><div class="field-item odd"><a href="/blog_topics/leaders/index.html" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Leaders</a></div><div class="field-item even"><a href="/blog-topics/interview" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Interview</a></div><div class="field-item odd"><a href="/blog_topics/research/index.html" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Research</a></div><div class="field-item even"><a href="/blog-topics/participation-gap" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Participation Gap</a></div><div class="field-item odd"><a href="/blog-topics/nliatinquiry" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">NLIatInquiry</a></div><div class="field-item even"><a href="/blog-topics/digital-learning" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Digital Learning</a></div></div></div>Wed, 02 Mar 2011 23:32:00 +0000Sarah Davis130 at http://newlearninginstitute.orghttp://newlearninginstitute.org/blog/young-and-digital-interview-s-craig-watkins-part-ii#commentsThe Young and the Digital: Interview with S. Craig Watkins, Part Ihttp://newlearninginstitute.org/blog/young-and-digital-interview-s-craig-watkins-part-i <div class="field field-name-body field-type-text-with-summary field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even" property="content:encoded"><p><a href="http://3.bp.blogspot.com/-ApYSHPS_UD8/TWhGvWP3buI/AAAAAAAABdI/Gqd30Oj4CDM/s1600/digital%2Byouth.jpg" onblur="try {parent.deselectBloggerImageGracefully();} catch(e) {}"><img src="http://3.bp.blogspot.com/-ApYSHPS_UD8/TWhGvWP3buI/AAAAAAAABdI/Gqd30Oj4CDM/s1600/digital%2Byouth.jpg" alt="" style="display: block; margin: 0px auto 10px; text-align: center; cursor: hand;" class="feature-top" id="BLOGGER_PHOTO_ID_5577785917738282722" border="0" /></a><br /><br /><em>This post is part of a series of interviews highlighting leaders in the field of New Learning (what we call “NLI at Inquiry”). Recently, we interviewed Professor S. Craig Watkins of the University of Texas at Austin on subjects including social media in different contexts, the participation gap, the quality and consequences of young people’s media engagement, and the future of social media. Here, in Part I of the interview, he discusses his current research.</em></p><div><br /><div><img src="http://1.bp.blogspot.com/--WEEW3ZasIo/TWhGbgcc9TI/AAAAAAAABdA/_8VqYePD0Ic/s320/WatkinsPic.JPG" alt="" style="float: left; margin: 0 10px 10px 0; cursor: hand; width: 214px; height: 320px;" id="BLOGGER_PHOTO_ID_5577785576878044466" border="0" /><div>S. Craig Watkins teaches in the departments of Radio-Television-Film and Sociology and the Center for African and African American Studies at the University of Texas at Austin. Currently, Professor Watkins is launching a new digital media research initiative that focuses on the use and evolution of social media platforms, and he will also be participating in a MacArthur Foundation research network studying diverse communities of young people and their engagement with digital media. For</div><div>updates on these and other projects, visit <a href="http://theyoungandthedigital.com">http://theyoungandthedigital.com</a>.</div><div style="font-weight: bold;"> </div></div><strong>Professor Watkins, please tell us about your current research.</strong><br /><br />In general, my research focuses on the relationship between young people and technology, in particular their engagement with social, digital, and mobile media platforms. I’ve spent a great deal of time looking at young people’s engagement with technology, primarily in informal learning environments and ecologies. For example, we are asking what kids are doing with mobile and social media outside of formal learning environments, particularly the classroom, and how they have created very vibrant expressions of culture, identity, and community.<br />We’re still looking at those kinds of things, but we’re also beginning to think about the ways in which schools are beginning to now integrate social, mobile, and digital media platforms into the classroom, and we’re beginning to think about how technology can be used to engage students more effectively; at how technology can be used to create a much more dynamic relationship between teachers and students, students and their peers. So we’re really beginning to think about how what has been happening for years now outside formal learning environments like schools – particularly kids’ dynamic engagement with technology – [is] beginning to influence and impact the kinds of things that educators are doing inside the classroom.<br />We just finished a big Facebook study. That study basically was a national survey of young adults, looking at the evolution of their social media behaviors – thinking about how, as they transition from one stage in the youth life cycle to another stage, their engagement with social media evolves. In particular, we focused a lot of the survey questions around Facebook.</div><div> </div><div><strong>What were some of the results you found interesting from the Facebook study? </strong></div><div> </div><div>We did the Facebook study for a couple of reasons primarily. We knew, based on some of the earlier research we had conducted, that engagement with social media is a constant process of evolution. In other words, I think there is a tendency to think that how a teenager uses social media is a predictor of how they will use social media as they get older. We saw early on in our research evidence that ran counter to that. In fact, as people move through their life cycles, as they transition from one stage of life to the next stage, how they use social media, why they use social media, what social media means to them – it evolves, it changes. And so we wanted to conduct a survey that began to empirically identify and document some of those changes.<div> </div><div>Real quickly, the survey is split into two large groups in terms of the sample: of the total participants (about 905), about one half of the survey is made of current college students, the other half is made up of recent college graduates (people who have been out of college since 2005). We knew that, in all likelihood, just that window alone – the context of the transition from being in college to being out of college – would reveal some really interesting and sharp distinctions in terms of how people use social media and what they like to share on their social media profiles. In fact, a lot of that data bears this out; that as people transition from college into the paid workforce, as they’re pursuing their careers and beginning to think about establishing their families, the things that they share via Facebook begin to change. They become more protective about privacy and personal data that they reveal.</div><div> </div><div>We didn’t know this necessarily going into the survey, but there are some pretty interesting clear examples and evidence in our data about the distinctions between how men and women use Facebook. For example, women, compared to men, are much less likely to reveal personal kinds of data or personal kinds of interests, such as their religious or political views. The pictures that men post versus the pictures that women post tend to vary.</div><div> </div><div>So, what we tried to do with the survey is really begin to start looking at some concrete distinctions in terms of social media behavior, trying to think about a broader cultural context for social media behavior and how social media behavior intersects with gender, class, education. Again, we looked at the transition from one stage of life to the next, because there is a tendency to over-generalize young people’s engagement with social media. There’s a tendency to articulate a very generic or stereotypical narrative about young people’s engagement with technology without really understanding the nuances, distinctions, and differences that define and shape how they use social media.</div><div> </div></div><div><strong>To be continued...</strong></div><div><div>How does the digital divide impact social networks? How do individuals of differing backgrounds and socio-economic status experience digital media?</div><div> </div><div>Part II of our interview with Professor Watkins will focus on his thoughts on the participation gap and how individuals of differing backgrounds experience digital media.</div><div> </div><div><strong>Additional Resources on Professor Watkins' work, digital media, and learning:</strong></div><div><div><ul><li><a href="http://www.theyoungandthedigital.com/">The Young and the Digital</a></li><li><a href="http://vimeo.com/14777251">DML Conference 2011: Designing Learning Futures</a> (S. Craig Watkins)</li><li><a href="http://www.dmlcentral.net/conference2011">Digital Media and Learning Conference 2011 Website</a></li></ul></div></div></div><div class="blogger-post-footer"><img src="https://blogger.googleusercontent.com/tracker/902885274664531497-1183113980558974643?l=newlearninginstitute.blogspot.com" alt="" width="1" height="1" /></div></div></div></div><div class="field field-name-field-blog-topics field-type-taxonomy-term-reference field-label-above"><div class="field-label">Topics:&nbsp;</div><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><a href="/blog-topics/social-networking" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Social Networking</a></div><div class="field-item odd"><a href="/blog_topics/leaders/index.html" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Leaders</a></div><div class="field-item even"><a href="/blog-topics/interview" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Interview</a></div><div class="field-item odd"><a href="/blog_topics/research/index.html" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Research</a></div><div class="field-item even"><a href="/blog-topics/participation-gap" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Participation Gap</a></div><div class="field-item odd"><a href="/blog-topics/nliatinquiry" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">NLIatInquiry</a></div><div class="field-item even"><a href="/blog-topics/digital-learning" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Digital Learning</a></div></div></div>Sat, 26 Feb 2011 00:09:00 +0000Sarah Davis131 at http://newlearninginstitute.orghttp://newlearninginstitute.org/blog/young-and-digital-interview-s-craig-watkins-part-i#commentsPolitics and Civic Engagement: Interview with Joseph Kahne, Part IIIhttp://newlearninginstitute.org/blog/politics-and-civic-engagement-interview-joseph-kahne-part-iii <div class="field field-name-body field-type-text-with-summary field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even" property="content:encoded"><p><a href="http://4.bp.blogspot.com/-x2dc0V90W9I/TV7HuQqq_8I/AAAAAAAABc4/Mq8HJ6rvDDI/s1600/kahne.JPG" onblur="try {parent.deselectBloggerImageGracefully();} catch(e) {}"><img src="http://4.bp.blogspot.com/-x2dc0V90W9I/TV7HuQqq_8I/AAAAAAAABc4/Mq8HJ6rvDDI/s1600/kahne.JPG" alt="" style="display: block; margin: 0px auto 10px; text-align: center; cursor: hand;" class="feature-top" id="BLOGGER_PHOTO_ID_5575112986293108674" border="0" /></a></p><div><em>This post is part of a series of interviews highlighting leaders in the field of New Learning (what we call “NLI at Inquiry”). A few weeks ago, <a href="http://newlearninginstitute.blogspot.com/2011/02/politics-and-civic-engagement-interview.html">we interviewed Mills College Professor Joseph Kahne</a> about his research, trends in political engagement and civic participation, equitable digital media learning opportunities, and his thoughts on the future of civic engagement in education. In Part III, he discusses the importance of equitable distribution of digital media learning opportunities and the future of civic engagement.</em></div><div> </div><p><strong>Professor Kahne, discuss the importance of equitable distribution of digital media learning opportunities. </strong></p><div> </div><div>Since more and more civic and political life is carried out online, it is especially important to pay attention to the degree to which the digital media opportunities are equitably or inequitably distributed. There are a couple different dimensions of this that I think are worth attending to. Often we focus on the digital divide, which is generally understood to be assessments of the degree to which access to digital media is equitably distributed. Some people have broadband at home and other people don’t. Some people have computers and other people don’t. We have found that there is some inequity in access that is highly related to socioeconomic status; the more money people have, the more likely they are to have computers – the more likely they are to have broadband access, etc.; but one thing we’re finding that’s interesting is that, when it comes to some forms of access, (for example, smart phones), we may not see as much inequality as we might expect in relation to other dimensions. That’s the access question.</div><div> </div><div>It is also important to attend to the “participation gap.” Some people enter into participatory cultures and online communities while other people don’t? There is some evidence that the online participation gap may be smaller than it is in some other spheres of life. In our study – and we drew on data that Cathy Cohen collected, using a nationally representative dataset – we found that students of color and low-income students were just as likely to participate in participatory cultures and online communities as kids of higher socioeconomic status and as white kids. When it comes to explicit political participation, there’s some inequality, but it is perhaps less than inequality in offline political participation. At least, that’s what the indications are from a new study by Kay Schlozman and colleagues that was done by the Pew Internet &amp; American Life Project.</div><div> </div><div>There’s also a third form of potential inequality related to the distribution of digital media learning opportunities. The things that we were just talking about are more about what young people have in their home or in their out-of-school life. But it’s also fundamentally important to see to what extent there is equitable distribution within school in terms of digital media learning opportunities. We know that civic learning opportunities are inequitably distributed. We did a study that found that young people were far more likely to get opportunities to debate with one another or to do service learning, or to engage in simulations, if they were white, if they were of higher socioeconomic status, or if they were higher achieving (in tracked classes with higher-achieving kids). We don’t know, whether digital media learning opportunities in school are equitably distributed. That’s something we really need to study.</div><div> </div><div><strong>How do you envision civic engagement in the future? Political participation? For instance, if online networks become the norm for civic and political engagement, how could this online participation differ from geographic participation? </strong></div><div> </div><div>There’s no doubt that there’s already been a massive move, especially by young people, to engage civically and politically in ways that utilize and draw on digital media. I think we would expect that to continue, and more and more people will be getting their information in those ways, participating in discussions through digital media, etc. It seems likely that geography will still be very important but, it does seem important to imagine that we may need to broaden and redefine what it means to be local – that it’s possible for there to be online forms or visions of localism. This is something that my colleague Ellen Middaugh and I wrote about recently. We discussed ways in which people can be part of online communities that share the features of being in a local community in some important ways, even though they’re not geographic locales.</div><div> </div><div><strong>Special thanks</strong></div><div><div> </div><div>We’d like to extend a special thanks to Professor Joseph Kahne for taking the time to talk with us.</div></div><div> </div><div><strong>Additional Resources on Professor Kahne's Work:</strong></div><div><ul><li><a href="http://www.civicsurvey.org/CERG_Network.html">Civic Engagement Research Group at Mills College</a></li><li><a href="http://www.pewinternet.org/">Pew Internet &amp; American Life Project</a></li></ul></div><div class="blogger-post-footer"><img src="https://blogger.googleusercontent.com/tracker/902885274664531497-8056460499075778032?l=newlearninginstitute.blogspot.com" alt="" width="1" height="1" /></div></div></div></div><div class="field field-name-field-blog-topics field-type-taxonomy-term-reference field-label-above"><div class="field-label">Topics:&nbsp;</div><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><a href="/blog_topics/leaders/index.html" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Leaders</a></div><div class="field-item odd"><a href="/blog-topics/interview" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Interview</a></div><div class="field-item even"><a href="/blog_topics/research/index.html" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Research</a></div><div class="field-item odd"><a href="/blog_topics/civic_engagement/index.html" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Civic Engagement</a></div><div class="field-item even"><a href="/blog-topics/nliatinquiry" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">NLIatInquiry</a></div><div class="field-item odd"><a href="/blog-topics/digital-learning" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Digital Learning</a></div></div></div>Fri, 18 Feb 2011 19:17:00 +0000Sarah Davis132 at http://newlearninginstitute.orghttp://newlearninginstitute.org/blog/politics-and-civic-engagement-interview-joseph-kahne-part-iii#commentsPolitics and Civic Engagement: Interview with Joseph Kahne, Part IIhttp://newlearninginstitute.org/blog/politics-and-civic-engagement-interview-joseph-kahne-part-ii <div class="field field-name-body field-type-text-with-summary field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even" property="content:encoded"><p><a href="http://2.bp.blogspot.com/_AJz3zglnLrs/TVQ6_1kQjZI/AAAAAAAABcw/K502WzN50xk/s1600/kahne.JPG" onblur="try {parent.deselectBloggerImageGracefully();} catch(e) {}"><img src="http://2.bp.blogspot.com/_AJz3zglnLrs/TVQ6_1kQjZI/AAAAAAAABcw/K502WzN50xk/s1600/kahne.JPG" alt="" style="display: block; margin: 0px auto 10px; text-align: center; cursor: pointer;" class="feature-top" id="BLOGGER_PHOTO_ID_5572143507349474706" border="0" /></a></p><p> </p><div><em>This post is part of a series of interviews highlighting leaders in the field of New Learning (what we call “NLI at Inquiry”). A couple of weeks ago, <a href="http://newlearninginstitute.blogspot.com/2011/02/politics-and-civic-engagement-interview.html">we interviewed Mills College Professor Joseph Kahne</a> about his research, trends in political engagement and civic participation, equitable digital media learning opportunities, and his thoughts on the future of civic engagement in education. In Part II, he discusses how educators can teach civics through digital media use.</em></div><div> </div><div><strong>Professor Kahne, how can educators teach civics through the use of digital media? Does the content matter, or is it more about how students interact with each other? Discuss how friendship-driven participation compares with interest-driven participation.</strong></div><div> </div><div>There are a variety of ways that digital media can support civic and political development. First, clearly, more and more people are doing core acts of civic and political life online. They’re expressing their opinions online, they’re getting their information online, they’re entering into discussions with others online, they’re being mobilized and mobilizing other people online; they might create a website tied to the issues they care about. Fundraising goes on online. There’s a huge number of ways digital media is embedded in civic and political life. One thing that educators can do is to help young people develop the skills needed to participate in those contexts. How do you tell whether the information you’re getting is credible? What are productive ways to get into a dialogue online that doesn’t lead to flaming and disrespectful interaction? Media literacy skills are very important.</div><div> </div><div>And, we found in our studies that when teachers give young people opportunities to develop those skills – when, for example, they require that young people go online to get multiple points of view on an issue, or to create a website that communicates a perspective, or to discuss how to judge the trustworthiness of sources of information – those experiences lead young people to be more likely to do those things in their discretionary time. So we have some evidence that teaching those digital media literacy skills, and especially those skills that relate to civic life, is productive in terms of promoting more engagement.</div><div> </div><div>Another thing found is that interest-based engagement with digital media can be quite valuable. When young people enter into online communities, or are a part of what Henry Jenkins calls a “participatory culture,” they frequently get a set of experiences that it appears (from our studies) promote or build a bridge to broader civic and political engagement. They learn skills of how to be part of community, which is key, and an appreciation of those norms; they get a sense of the possibility and value of collective efforts; they probably get exposed, unintentionally, to information about opportunities to get involved, and about issues they might care about.</div><div> </div><div>What are the implications for educators? Many interest-based communities can be things that young people can engage with in out-of-school/afterschool programs. So it’s important for us not just to think of this as something schools deliver. In addition, many of the features of those communities, those participatory cultures, can be connected to academic content. If, for example, educators could use social media to create ways for peers to comment on one another’s work, or on each other’s perspectives on various issues, that can create a context that is more authentic and more compelling for young people; and through which they can learn a great deal about the issues they’re engaging.</div><div> </div><div>Games that focus on civic and political life can also be helpful. Games can provide simulations where young people get a sense of what it is to be a leader of a community, to be a mayor or to be part of an organization; they can simulate courtrooms, legislative bodies…they can do all sorts of different things.</div><div> </div><div>These interest-driven participatory communities differ somewhat from friendship-driven participation. We found that when young people are engaged with their interests, like in hobbies or fan culture, we see increases in those individuals’ participation. We have a longitudinal study that we did where we followed over 400 kids over time, where we could see that if you were involved in those interest-driven communities, they became more likely to participate. But we did not find that friendship-driven participation had any effect, either positive or negative. So, for example, if youth email their friends or socialize on Facebook or through social media, we didn’t see that had an impact one way or the other.</div><div> </div><div><strong>To be continued...</strong></div><div> </div><div>What is the extent to which digital media opportunities are inequitable and how might inequities be addressed? In the future, how could online participation differ from geographic participation?</div><div> </div><div>Next week we will publish Part III of our interview with Professor Kahne, focusing on his thoughts on the equity of digital media opportunities and the future of types of civic and political participation.</div><div> </div><div><strong>Additional Resources on Professor Kahne’s work:</strong></div><div><ul><li><a href="http://www.civicsurvey.org/CERG_Network.html">Civic Engagement Research Group at Mills College</a></li><li><a href="http://www.pewinternet.org/">Pew Internet &amp; American Life Project</a></li></ul></div><div class="blogger-post-footer"><img src="https://blogger.googleusercontent.com/tracker/902885274664531497-7348480196522404286?l=newlearninginstitute.blogspot.com" alt="" width="1" height="1" /></div></div></div></div><div class="field field-name-field-blog-topics field-type-taxonomy-term-reference field-label-above"><div class="field-label">Topics:&nbsp;</div><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><a href="/blog_topics/leaders/index.html" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Leaders</a></div><div class="field-item odd"><a href="/blog-topics/interview" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Interview</a></div><div class="field-item even"><a href="/blog_topics/research/index.html" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Research</a></div><div class="field-item odd"><a href="/blog_topics/civic_engagement/index.html" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Civic Engagement</a></div><div class="field-item even"><a href="/blog-topics/nliatinquiry" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">NLIatInquiry</a></div><div class="field-item odd"><a href="/blog-topics/digital-learning" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Digital Learning</a></div></div></div>Thu, 10 Feb 2011 19:19:00 +0000Sarah Davis136 at http://newlearninginstitute.orghttp://newlearninginstitute.org/blog/politics-and-civic-engagement-interview-joseph-kahne-part-ii#commentsPolitics and Civic Engagement: Interview with Joseph Kahne, Part I.http://newlearninginstitute.org/blog/politics-and-civic-engagement-interview-joseph-kahne-part-i <div class="field field-name-body field-type-text-with-summary field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even" property="content:encoded"><p><a href="http://4.bp.blogspot.com/_AJz3zglnLrs/TUxo-DTpdhI/AAAAAAAABco/ncYg7kIhVgk/s1600/kahne.JPG" onblur="try {parent.deselectBloggerImageGracefully();} catch(e) {}"><img src="http://4.bp.blogspot.com/_AJz3zglnLrs/TUxo-DTpdhI/AAAAAAAABco/ncYg7kIhVgk/s1600/kahne.JPG" alt="" style="display: block; margin: 0px auto 10px; text-align: center; cursor: pointer;" class="feature-top" id="BLOGGER_PHOTO_ID_5569942254399354386" border="0" /></a><br /><span style="font-style: italic;">This post is part of a series of interviews highlighting leaders in the field of New Learning (what we call “NLI at Inquiry”). Last week, we interviewed Mills College Professor Joseph Kahne about his research, trends in political engagement and civic participation, equitable digital media learning opportunities, and his thoughts on the future of civic engagement in education. In Part I, he discusses his current research.</span><br /><br />Joseph Kahne is Chair of the Youth &amp; Participatory Politics Research Network (YPP) and is the John and Martha Davidson Professor of Education at Mills College, where he was previously Dean of the School of Education. His research focuses on ways that school practices and new media influence the civic and political development of youth. He also studies urban school reform. Together with Ellen Middaugh and Chris Evans at Mills and Amanda Lenhart, Alexandra Rankin Macgill, and Jessica Vitak at the Pew Internet &amp; American Life Project, Professor Kahne recently completed the first nationally representative survey of youth that examined the civic potential of video games. He also recently completed a longitudinal study with Sue Sporte of how opportunities in schools, homes, and communities influenced the civic outcomes of 4,000 students in Chicago’s public schools.<br /><br />Currently, he is writing up findings from a panel study of the impact of new media participation and civic education on students from 19 districts across California. His work has been published in leading education journals including the American Educational Research Journal, Phi Delta Kappan, and the Harvard Educational Review. Professor Kahne sits on the steering committee of the National Campaign for the Civic Mission of Schools and on the Advisory Board of the Center for Information and Research on Civic Learning and Engagement (CIRCLE). With Cathy Cohen, he is Co-Principal Investigator on YPP's quantitative research component – Mapping Youth Participatory Politics.<br /><br /><span style="font-weight: bold;">Professor Kahne, can you tell us about your current research?</span><br /><br />We know that new media are increasingly central to many aspects of political participation. New media are used to get information, to discuss issues with others, to share one's perspective (with individuals, with elected officials, with groups), to recruit others for activities, and to raise funds.<br /><br />The impact of participation is uncertain. For example, new media may expand access to both information and misinformation. In addition, individuals will have access to an unprecedented array of views – but individuals can choose to only seek out those who share their perspectives. There will be many more ways to participate, but this may also widen the gap between those who do participate and those who do not.<br /><br />I'm particularly interested in studying how youth participation with new media will impact the quality, quantity, and equality of participation and in ways to intervene (through education, mentoring, software design, etc.) to better tap the potential of new media while minimizing the risks.<br /><br /><strong>How do you define and discuss political engagement and civic participation? What are the variables you use to measure them, and why do you choose these variables? </strong><br /><br />In our work, we tend to look at a range of different variables because all people, and young people in particular, participate in a wide variety of ways – both traditional and nontraditional.<br />We look at traditional political participation – such as voting, working on campaigns, fundraising, mobilizing and issue-oriented participation. We also look at traditional civic participation: volunteering, giving money for charities, raising money for charities, working with others on community problem-solving, or being on a PTA or a board for a group.<br /><br />Then we also look (and this is increasingly important with the digital media) at expressions of public voice and efforts to influence the opinions of others. That can take the form of protests or petitions, but it can also show up in newer forms such as blogs or in poetry slams or remixes. There are a lot of ways to have public voice, depending on the context, that can be understood as civic and political forms of life.<br /><br />Another relatively newer and growing form of civic and political participation is what we might call “expressions of consumer or lifestyle politics.” For young people especially, there’s a somewhat diminished focus on the state as the primary institution one needs to change. In other words, often there is a focus on trying to elicit change through consumer preferences or either buy-cotting or boycotting; people sometimes understand their lifestyle – what clothes they wear or what foods they eat – to be a political statement. Those are important.<br /><br />There are also cognitive forms of engagement – for example, having conversations with people about civic or political life and analysis of issues that you do through interactions with family and friends.<br /><br /><strong>To be continued...</strong><br /><br />How can educators teach civics through the use of digital media? Does the content matter, or is it more about how students interact with each other?<br /><br />Next week we will publish Part II of our interview with Professor Kahne, focusing on his thoughts about teaching civics through digital media.<br /><br /><strong>Additional Resources on Professor Kahne’s work:</strong></p><p> </p><ul><li><a href="http://www.civicsurvey.org/CERG_Network.html">Civic Engagement Research Group at Mills College </a></li><li><a href="http://www.pewinternet.org/">Pew Internet &amp; American Life Project</a></li></ul><div class="blogger-post-footer"><img src="https://blogger.googleusercontent.com/tracker/902885274664531497-4914992698053851495?l=newlearninginstitute.blogspot.com" alt="" width="1" height="1" /></div></div></div></div><div class="field field-name-field-blog-topics field-type-taxonomy-term-reference field-label-above"><div class="field-label">Topics:&nbsp;</div><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><a href="/blog_topics/leaders/index.html" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Leaders</a></div><div class="field-item odd"><a href="/blog-topics/interview" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Interview</a></div><div class="field-item even"><a href="/blog_topics/research/index.html" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Research</a></div><div class="field-item odd"><a href="/blog_topics/civic_engagement/index.html" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Civic Engagement</a></div><div class="field-item even"><a href="/blog-topics/nliatinquiry" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">NLIatInquiry</a></div><div class="field-item odd"><a href="/blog-topics/digital-learning" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Digital Learning</a></div></div></div>Fri, 04 Feb 2011 16:37:00 +0000Sarah Davis137 at http://newlearninginstitute.orghttp://newlearninginstitute.org/blog/politics-and-civic-engagement-interview-joseph-kahne-part-i#commentsParticipatory Culture and Civic Engagement: Interview with Henry Jenkins, Part IIIhttp://newlearninginstitute.org/blog/participatory-culture-and-civic-engagement-interview-henry-jenkins-part-iii <div class="field field-name-body field-type-text-with-summary field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even" property="content:encoded"><p><iframe src="http://player.vimeo.com/video/15732305?title=0&amp;byline=0&amp;portrait=0&amp;color=e0b928" width="601" frameborder="0" height="338"></iframe><br /><span style="font-style: italic;">This post is the first in a series of interviews highlighting leaders in the field of New Learning (what we call “NLI at Inquiry”). A few weeks ago, </span><a href="http://newlearninginstitute.blogspot.com/2010/12/participatory-culture-and-civic.html" style="font-style: italic;">we interviewed USC professor Henry Jenkins </a><span style="font-style: italic;">about his research, trends, and his thoughts on the future of civic engagement in education. Because Professor Jenkins answered our questions so generously and thoughtfully, we separated the interview into three parts. In Part III, he answers questions about the future of civic engagement.</span><br /><br /><strong>Professor Jenkins, how do you see trends of civic engagement changing in the future for young people?</strong><br /><br />To be clear, my concept of participatory culture is a relative one. It describes some aspects of the lives of some portion of American young people. We do not live in a fully realized participatory culture; we live in a culture which is more participatory now than it was ten years ago. We still have many battles to fight in order to make it possible for a broader and more diverse array of young people to meaningfully participate in the emerging media landscape, and we have even bigger battles to fight before more young people can move from the kinds of cultural participation and social engagements offered online to a richer, more robust political participation and civic engagement.<br /><br />Talking about participatory culture helps us to identify what we are fighting for, and what we are finding in studying these new kinds of political organizations will help us to identify new forms of political participation which might open up the public sphere to more potential participants. Part of what we are struggling against is the participation gap – the unequal distribution of the skills and knowledge, the sense of empowerment, which motivates civic participation. What we are observing suggests that these alternative tactics may help young people who may not have seen themselves as political before find their voice as political agents.<br /><br /><strong>If it were up to you, what would the “perfect” school look like? How would the school use digital and social media to meet the needs of its students?</strong><br /><br />To me, the perfect school would, like the ideal online community, offer many potential ways of contributing and participating. It would value the full range of young people’s knowledge, intellectual capacities, and creative abilities. It would bridge between what takes place in the classroom and the world beyond the classroom in ways which allow for a more integrated learning ecology and which will enable people to develop a sense that they can make a difference in the world.<br /><br />Digital and social media are simply one set of tools which can be used to achieve these goals. They are not magically agents that transform bad schools into good. If new media is deployed without understanding and inspiration, then it can simply replicate the most deadening practices of traditional education. If you take a test on a computer, it is still a test. If you make a podcast rather than a book report, it may still be a book report by another name. On the other hand, if we embrace collaboration and appropriation in compelling ways, then it may not matter if they are being conducted using an online forum, a virtual world, or simply a group of kids talking face to face. If we encourage kids to think about themselves and the world through remixing existing media content, then it may not matter if they are doing so with a joystick or a pencil. If we encourage them to read closely and creatively, it may not matter whether they have a mouse or a book in their hands, and my ideal would be to raise a generation that is equally comfortable with books and iPads as long as they are learning to ask critical questions as they read.<br /><br /><span style="font-weight: bold;">In the future, how do we see ourselves influencing young people to be more civically engaged in the classroom? </span><br /><br />We are still trying to identify best practices from the new kinds of activist groups we are studying which might be usefully deployed in changing how young people think about the political process. But, there are things we know about civic education through many years of established research.<br /><br />First, civic education should not be marginalized in schools, since it is one of the major factors which can change how young people understand themselves as political agents.<br /><br />Second, civic education works best when young people are free to engage in debates and discussions about real world political issues rather than dealing with the operations of the government in the abstract. Right now, schools are terrified of anything which may be controversial and as a result, they often run away from the kinds of open political debates which were part of the civic educations of previous generations. The effective use of digital tools allows us to bring authentic materials into the classroom, including providing access to real world political players as potential guest speakers in our classes.<br /><br />Third, civic classes may matter little if the school models a repressive political system rather than respecting the political rights of students and teachers, encouraging them to voice their concern, and granting them some material impact on the policies that impact them. And again, the research suggests that many schools do none of these things, encouraging students to think about civics as a set of ideals which are not honored in practice at even the most local level. Censoring the school newspaper, blocking YouTube, refusing to respect the student government give young people the wrong message about their place within a more democratic society. The online world often allows young people a much greater sense of empowerment (both as a fantasy and as a reality) as they often can produce and share media openly with others, as they can exert power over the management of virtual worlds, as they can form alliances with other young people through social networking sites, and as they can take politically meaningful actions which may be closed to them in their face-to-face school environment.<br /><br />So, to return to <a href="http://newlearninginstitute.blogspot.com/2010/12/participatory-culture-and-civic_28.html">your initial point</a>, clicking a "like" button on Facebook may not be the most meaningful political act ever imagined, but it is often much more meaningful than anything young people are allowed to do in schools as they are currently constituted.<br /><br /><span style="font-weight: bold;"> Special thanks</span><br /><br />We’d like to extend a special thanks to Professor Henry Jenkins for providing such thoughtful comments.<br /><br /><strong>Additional Resources on Professor Jenkins’ work:</strong></p><p> </p><ul><li><a href="http://www.henryjenkins.org/">Confessions of an Aca-Fan: The Official Weblog of Henry Jenkins</a></li><li><a href="http://sites.google.com/site/participatorydemocracyproject/">From Participatory Culture to Public Participation</a></li><li><a href="http://civicpaths.net/groupblog/">Civics, Popular Media and Participatory Culture Group Blog</a></li><li><a href="http://www.newmedialiteracies.org/">Project New Media Literacies</a></li><li><a href="http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AFCLKa0XRlw">Henry Jenkins’ Presentation at TedxTalks (March 6, 2010)</a></li></ul><div class="blogger-post-footer"><img src="https://blogger.googleusercontent.com/tracker/902885274664531497-7417797285807533624?l=newlearninginstitute.blogspot.com" alt="" width="1" height="1" /></div></div></div></div><div class="field field-name-field-blog-topics field-type-taxonomy-term-reference field-label-above"><div class="field-label">Topics:&nbsp;</div><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><a href="/blog-topics/social-networking" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Social Networking</a></div><div class="field-item odd"><a href="/blog_topics/leaders/index.html" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Leaders</a></div><div class="field-item even"><a href="/blog-topics/interview" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Interview</a></div><div class="field-item odd"><a href="/blog_topics/research/index.html" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Research</a></div><div class="field-item even"><a href="/blog_topics/civic_engagement/index.html" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Civic Engagement</a></div><div class="field-item odd"><a href="/blog-topics/nliatinquiry" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">NLIatInquiry</a></div><div class="field-item even"><a href="/blog-topics/digital-learning" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Digital Learning</a></div></div></div>Tue, 04 Jan 2011 14:20:00 +0000Sarah Davis143 at http://newlearninginstitute.orghttp://newlearninginstitute.org/blog/participatory-culture-and-civic-engagement-interview-henry-jenkins-part-iii#commentsParticipatory Culture and Civic Engagement: Interview with Henry Jenkins, Part IIhttp://newlearninginstitute.org/blog/participatory-culture-and-civic-engagement-interview-henry-jenkins-part-ii <div class="field field-name-body field-type-text-with-summary field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even" property="content:encoded"><p><iframe src="http://player.vimeo.com/video/15732305?title=0&amp;byline=0&amp;portrait=0&amp;color=e0b928" width="601" frameborder="0" height="338"></iframe><br /><span style="font-style: italic;">This post is the first in a series of interviews highlighting leaders in the field of New Learning (what we call “NLI at Inquiry”). A couple of weeks ago, </span><a href="http://newlearninginstitute.blogspot.com/2010/12/participatory-culture-and-civic.html" style="font-style: italic;">we interviewed USC professor Henry Jenkins</a><span style="font-style: italic;"> about his research, trends, and his thoughts on the future of civic engagement in education. Because Professor Jenkins answered our questions so generously and thoughtfully, we’ve separated the interview into three parts. In Part II, he discusses the depth of civic engagement among youth today.</span><br /><br /><strong>Professor Jenkins, how does the act of “liking” a cause relate to calling a senator? Does changing your Facebook photo to reflect a cause reflect an increased or deeper engagement than clicking and “liking” it?</strong><br /><br />For starters, I’d argue that an action performed online does not signal more or fewer levels of political engagement than the same action performed off-line. So, clicking “like” on a social network profile is more or less equivalent to signing a petition on a street corner, a political act you may forget ten minutes after you do it. Writing an email or a blog post may be no more or less politically engaged than sending a letter to the editor of the local newspaper or writing to a congressman. And so forth. There’s a bit more likelihood of the act having more impact online if only because you are performing it, most likely, in front of a somewhat larger number of friends. But its impact still rests on your ability to be persuasive rather than on which platform you are using to perform it. 

<br /><br />This is not the model of activism we are studying. Contrary to what you may have heard about Facebook or Twitter activism, very few of these new groups work only online (or as those phrases suggest, work only through a single platform). These groups use new-media tools alongside more traditional kinds of face-to-face meetings as part of an array of resources through which their political activities are being conducted. They are making nuanced decisions about which platforms may offer the most promise to perform particular functions. The use of new media may allow them to expand the base of support for their activities, linking together efforts across local communities to expand their potential impact. Working online may allow them to lower the costs of soliciting support and may allow them to amplify their own voices as they tap in to the spread of messages through social networking sites. But in many cases, these efforts build on contacts made off-line, with people they know and work with face to face. These new-style politics are intended to expand rather than displace what can be done through more conventional channels.<br /><br /><strong>What constitutes meaningful engagement? Where do we draw the line in terms of its meaning? Is there a difference in how online and offline communities define meaningful engagement, and what effect is it having on civic matters today?</strong><br /><br />Whether we are talking online or off, meaningful engagement requires people to become informed about the issues, requires them to be connected with others and exerting an ongoing effort to make a difference in the world, requires them to find their voice and exert it in the cause of change-making. The tactics may be different for groups which leverage some of the affordances of the online world alongside more traditional activities. They may involve producing and spreading YouTube videos alongside designing and printing signs and buttons. They may involve participating in buycots (which use consumer power in support of particular groups and businesses) alongside participating in boycotts (which involve withholding purchases from groups one seeks to change).<br /><br />

Our work started with the recognition that fan organizations, for example, have had a long history of mobilizing their supporters in letter-writing campaigns to keep their favorite programs on the air. To be successful, they have to identify an issue and the pressure points which might change the outcome, educate and motivate their supporters to get involved, develop tactics for mobilization and outreach. All of this involves civic skills which can later be mobilized towards efforts in support of human rights and social justice. What’s distinctive is that these spheres of activity are merging. We are seeing fan groups seeking to change the world through putting pressure on media companies in regards to how they represent racial minorities or resisting constraints on fans’ use of intellectual property. And we are seeing groups like the Harry Potter Alliance using the fan infrastructure and the language of popular culture to educate young people about political involvement and to motivate them to try to take action in regards to issues that matter to them.<br /><br />

Ultimately, for me, what is new here is not the tools they use, but the cultural language and political models which shape their efforts. It’s interesting that these groups often team up with more conventional political organizations as they seek to move into the political arena, suggesting that, at the end of the day, both groups are willing to do what needs to be done to make a difference.<br /><br /><strong>To be continued...</strong><br /><br />How do you see trends of civic engagement changing in the future for young people? If it were up to you, what would the “perfect” school look like? How would the school use digital and social media to meet the needs of its students? In the future, how do we see ourselves influencing young people to be more civically engaged in the classroom?<br /><br />Next week we will publish Part III of our interview with Professor Jenkins, focusing on his thoughts about the future of civic engagement.<br /><br /><strong>Additional Resources on Professor Jenkins’ work:</strong></p><p> </p><ul><li><a href="http://www.henryjenkins.org/">Confessions of an Aca-Fan: The Official Weblog of Henry Jenkins</a></li><li><a href="http://sites.google.com/site/participatorydemocracyproject/">From Participatory Culture to Public Participation</a></li><li><a href="http://civicpaths.net/groupblog/">Civics, Popular Media and Participatory Culture Group Blog</a></li><li><a href="http://www.newmedialiteracies.org/">Project New Media Literacies</a></li><li><a href="http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AFCLKa0XRlw">Henry Jenkins’ Presentation at TedxTalks (March 6, 2010)</a></li></ul><div class="blogger-post-footer"><img src="https://blogger.googleusercontent.com/tracker/902885274664531497-2325634129974942604?l=newlearninginstitute.blogspot.com" alt="" width="1" height="1" /></div></div></div></div><div class="field field-name-field-blog-topics field-type-taxonomy-term-reference field-label-above"><div class="field-label">Topics:&nbsp;</div><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><a href="/blog-topics/social-networking" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Social Networking</a></div><div class="field-item odd"><a href="/blog_topics/leaders/index.html" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Leaders</a></div><div class="field-item even"><a href="/blog-topics/interview" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Interview</a></div><div class="field-item odd"><a href="/blog_topics/research/index.html" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Research</a></div><div class="field-item even"><a href="/blog_topics/civic_engagement/index.html" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Civic Engagement</a></div><div class="field-item odd"><a href="/blog-topics/nliatinquiry" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">NLIatInquiry</a></div><div class="field-item even"><a href="/blog-topics/digital-learning" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Digital Learning</a></div></div></div>Tue, 28 Dec 2010 16:27:00 +0000Sarah Davis146 at http://newlearninginstitute.orghttp://newlearninginstitute.org/blog/participatory-culture-and-civic-engagement-interview-henry-jenkins-part-ii#comments