New Learning Institute - Design Studiohttp://www.newlearninginstitute.org/blog-topics/design-studio enDigital Dispatch: The Youth Design Program at the Field Museumhttp://www.newlearninginstitute.org/blog/digital-dispatch-youth-design-program-field-museum <div class="field field-name-body field-type-text-with-summary field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even" property="content:encoded"><p><img src="http://farm9.staticflickr.com/8225/8436248958_b86cb33e7d_o.png" alt="" /></p><p><em>Teens in Chicago have been busy at work designing a pop-up museum that brings a youth-created exhibit to the community. They've picked their theme and are now working on designing the details of the experience.</em></p><p><strong>Sophie</strong>, an 11th grader from the Youth Design Team shares an update below:</p><p>Here at The Field Museum the Youth Design Team has been hard at work! After weeks of thorough deliberation, all ten of us high schoolers have come to agree on a topic which we will produce a pop-up exhibit on! The marriage of all of our ideas led to a decision to focus on the sometime harmonious, sometime contentious but often overlooked relationship between humans and the natural world. Titled HumaNature, our pop-up exhibition is about the ways in which Nature changes us…and we change nature. With vital deadlines approaching every week, we have little time to fool around! Among the ten of us, we equally distributed the dense impending workload by taking on a job. </p><p>The Content team has made an immense amount of progress. They’ve recently finished sifting through information and condensing facts into comprehensible text panels. They also helped to generate display ideas for graphics. Currently the Content team is helping out the Social Outreach team by generating facts to give the public a sneak peek of things to come. Like our Facebook page facebook.com/TakeTheField to get the insider scoop! And, stay tuned: the Social Outreach team is creating a website that will feature the videos and interactives that accompany HumaNature. </p><p>The Design team has chosen a color palette as well as developed a logo. They are currently learning how to use Adobe Illustrator to produce the exhibit panels and the logo. In the future they will be helping the Video Producer with the graphic look and feel for the films as well as produce posters with QR codes for Production. </p><p>The Interactives team is crafting early prototypes for games visitors to our pop-up exhibition can play. Among the early ideas: a flipbook and a game for an iPad…and something with zombies!</p><p>Video Production is working to produce films visitors can download at the exhibit or view on the website. They have three videos in production on various ways humans and the natural world are intricately involved.</p><p>Our Production team has generated blueprints for the exhibit as well as setup and shutdown plans. These are constantly evolving as more additions are made to the exhibit. The team is working closely with the Interactives team to plan the assembly of analog and digital experiences!</p><p>As deadlines draw near and the things get increasingly hectic, the Youth Design Team is efficiently progressing toward the completion of HumaNature. Stay tuned for weekly updates on what’s going on with us!</p><p> </p></div></div></div><div class="field field-name-field-blog-topics field-type-taxonomy-term-reference field-label-above"><div class="field-label">Topics:&nbsp;</div><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><a href="/blog_topics/design_studio/index.html" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Design Studio</a></div><div class="field-item odd"><a href="/blog-topics/museums" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Museums</a></div><div class="field-item even"><a href="/blog-topics/community" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Community</a></div></div></div>Fri, 01 Feb 2013 18:48:34 +0000Nancy Chou182 at http://www.newlearninginstitute.orghttp://www.newlearninginstitute.org/blog/digital-dispatch-youth-design-program-field-museum#commentsDigital Dispatch: Biodiversity Quest in Chicago, Week #2http://www.newlearninginstitute.org/blog/digital-dispatch-biodiversity-quest-chicago-week-2 <div class="field field-name-body field-type-text-with-summary field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even" property="content:encoded"><p><a href="http://3.bp.blogspot.com/-xGUEcgMUnFM/TdWQi_es4JI/AAAAAAAABQw/pb4AATm5beQ/s1600/BQ_week2_1.JPG" onblur="try {parent.deselectBloggerImageGracefully();} catch(e) {}"><img src="http://3.bp.blogspot.com/-xGUEcgMUnFM/TdWQi_es4JI/AAAAAAAABQw/pb4AATm5beQ/s400/BQ_week2_1.JPG" alt="" style="display: block; margin: 0px auto 10px; text-align: center; cursor: hand; width: 400px; height: 267px;" id="BLOGGER_PHOTO_ID_5608547841789976722" border="0" /></a><br /><span style="font-size: 85%;"><span style="font-family: verdana;">The second week of the Biodiversity Quest program at Bouchet Academy in Chicago exposed the middle school participants to the concepts of biodiversity and conservation biology. Merove Heifetz and Liana Vitali, from the ARKive team, visited the class and led them in <a href="http://www.arkive.org/education/resources">several activities</a> to help them understand the importance of maintaining a diversity of species around the world, as well as the many threats that species and their habitats encounter. The ARKive team took the students on a “safari” through the ARKive website that taught them more about threatened animals and plants around the world, but also required the students to learn the many ways you can search for species on the ARKive website, including by their threatened status, habitat, or geography. The students were excited to learn about animals they'd never heard of before like the <a href="http://www.arkive.org/tennents-leaf-nosed-lizard/ceratophora-tennentii/">Tennent's leafed-nosed lizard</a> from Asia and the <a href="http://www.arkive.org/atlantic-royal-flycatcher/onychorhynchus-swainsoni/">Atlantic royal flycatcher</a> from South America. The young people were also intrigued to find out new facts about species they were already familiar with, like the <a href="http://www.arkive.org/koala/phascolarctos-cinereus/">koala</a>. The ability to immediately access videos and photos of these species on the ARKive website helped the students become excited about the research they will have to do on the species highlighted in their quests.

<br /><br />The Biodiversity Quest participants were also able to use Skype to interview a conservation biologist from the <a href="http://www.janegoodall.org/">Jane Goodall Institute</a>. Lilian Pintea called the class from Washington, DC and talked about the importance of conservation of chimpanzees and why he became involved with this work. The students were eager to ask him questions about what he does and the species he works to save. One student asked, “What made you interested in Conservation Biology?” Lilian replied, “After learning so much about different species, I realized the impact that we all have on many levels - social, economic, political – on the well-being of a species and the responsibility we have to take action.”<br /><br />

Stay tuned for the next update from the Biodiversity Quest program at Bouchet Academy! </span> </span></p><div class="blogger-post-footer"><img src="https://blogger.googleusercontent.com/tracker/902885274664531497-3231719521220233032?l=newlearninginstitute.blogspot.com" alt="" width="1" height="1" /></div></div></div></div><div class="field field-name-field-blog-topics field-type-taxonomy-term-reference field-label-above"><div class="field-label">Topics:&nbsp;</div><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><a href="/blog_topics/design_studio/index.html" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Design Studio</a></div><div class="field-item odd"><a href="/blog-topics/project-based-learning" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Project Based Learning</a></div><div class="field-item even"><a href="/blog_topics/mobile_learning/index.html" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Mobile Learning</a></div><div class="field-item odd"><a href="/blog-topics/digital-learning" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Digital Learning</a></div><div class="field-item even"><a href="/blog_topics/21st_century_skills/index.html" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">21st Century Skills</a></div></div></div>Thu, 19 May 2011 21:38:00 +0000Nancy Chou118 at http://www.newlearninginstitute.orghttp://www.newlearninginstitute.org/blog/digital-dispatch-biodiversity-quest-chicago-week-2#commentsBiodiversity Quest Program Launches in Chicagohttp://www.newlearninginstitute.org/blog/biodiversity-quest-program-launches-chicago <div class="field field-name-body field-type-text-with-summary field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even" property="content:encoded"><p><a href="http://4.bp.blogspot.com/-C7TXPveT7xk/Ta9vKQuBwBI/AAAAAAAABQY/gZ3jf55B0do/s1600/P1040476.JPG" onblur="try {parent.deselectBloggerImageGracefully();} catch(e) {}"><img src="http://4.bp.blogspot.com/-C7TXPveT7xk/Ta9vKQuBwBI/AAAAAAAABQY/gZ3jf55B0do/s400/P1040476.JPG" alt="" style="display: block; margin: 0px auto 10px; text-align: center; cursor: hand; width: 400px; height: 300px;" id="BLOGGER_PHOTO_ID_5597815083922210834" border="0" /></a></p><div> </div><div><em>Young visitors at a zoo run from exhibit to exhibit fascinated to see animals up close they've only seen in pictures or on TV. They pause to watch an animal for a minute or two and then are off to the next one. A placard or an encounter with a member of the zoo staff offers them some more information about the animals, but would it be possible to use mobile technology to help these young visitors learn even more by making connections between the exhibits they visit? </em></div><div> </div><div><a href="http://newlearninginstitute.org/">New Learning Institute</a> has partnered with several organizations to create the Biodiversity Quest program in Chicago to challenge young people to create mobile experiences, also known as quests, at <a href="http://www.lpzoo.org/">Lincoln Park Zoo</a>. Designed in collaboration with <a href="http://www.rootsandshoots.org/">Jane Goodall's Roots &amp; Shoots </a> and the <a href="http://www.arkive.org/">ARKive project</a>, these youth-designed quests will aim to educate other young visitors about endangered species, as well as show them how they can take action to help save the planet's threatened and endangered species.</div><div> </div><div>Biodiversity Quest is an eight-week afterschool program held at Bouchet Academy on the South Side of Chicago. Over the course of the workshops, sixth and seventh grade students from Bouchet will design the mobile quests to be played at Lincoln Park Zoo. The quests will each have a theme that leads other young visitors around the Zoo and helps them draw connections between exhibits. As an example, a group might design a quest that guides visitors to the exhibits of several species that share threatened status because of common threats to their habitats.</div><div> </div><div>NLI has worked closely with partners to design a program framework that provides an engaging, hands-on experience for the youth participants. Jane Goodall's Roots &amp; Shoots program helped structure the workshops with their <a href="http://www.rootsandshoots.org/aboutus/model">model</a> of moving young people from knowledge to compassion and into taking action, making a difference for people, animals, and the environment around them. The students in the Biodiversity Quest program begin by learning about biodiversity, conservation biology, and how species become threatened or endangered. They then connect their new awareness to their own interests by choosing species that they find most intriguing to use as the focus of their quests. Then the young participants take action by conducting research and including in their quest how a visitor to Lincoln Park Zoo could help the cause of a threatened or endangered species which may be found across the globe or as close as their own backyard.</div><div> </div><div><a href="http://www.arkive.org">ARKive</a> brings to the Biodiversity Quest a wealth of endangered species media, biological information and <a href="http://www.arkive.org/education/resources">educational resources</a>. This unique global initiative is leading the 'virtual' conservation effort by finding, sorting, cataloguing and digitizing threatened species multimedia into individual species profiles. ARKive.org is a user-friendly and searchable treasure trove of professional wildlife photos, videos, and biological information for over 12,000 threatened species (and still growing!). The participants in the Biodiversity Quest workshops will build their quests using ARKive biological information and will have access to over 80,000 stunning wildlife photos and videos from the ARKive website. Adding this rich media to the quests will allow the young designers to enhance the experience of zoo visitors.</div><div> </div><div>The Biodiversity Quest program launched in Chicago on March 22nd. Working in a collaborative environment, participants will engage in project-based learning that includes an authentic outcome : mobile quests that will be shared with other visitors at Lincoln Park Zoo. Over the next few months we will post Digital Dispatches describing the workshops and the progress the young participants are making on their quests. Check back for an update on their first two weeks soon!</div><div class="blogger-post-footer"><img src="https://blogger.googleusercontent.com/tracker/902885274664531497-2648119031854286599?l=newlearninginstitute.blogspot.com" alt="" width="1" height="1" /></div></div></div></div><div class="field field-name-field-blog-topics field-type-taxonomy-term-reference field-label-above"><div class="field-label">Topics:&nbsp;</div><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><a href="/blog_topics/technology_integration/index.html" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Technology Integration</a></div><div class="field-item odd"><a href="/blog-topics/nliatwork" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">NLIatWork</a></div><div class="field-item even"><a href="/blog-topics/digital-literacy" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Digital Literacy</a></div><div class="field-item odd"><a href="/blog_topics/design_studio/index.html" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Design Studio</a></div><div class="field-item even"><a href="/blog-topics/project-based-learning" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Project Based Learning</a></div><div class="field-item odd"><a href="/blog-topics/digital-learning" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Digital Learning</a></div><div class="field-item even"><a href="/blog_topics/21st_century_skills/index.html" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">21st Century Skills</a></div></div></div>Wed, 20 Apr 2011 21:15:00 +0000Nancy Chou122 at http://www.newlearninginstitute.orghttp://www.newlearninginstitute.org/blog/biodiversity-quest-program-launches-chicago#commentsDigital Dispatch: Web Design at the Hirshhornhttp://www.newlearninginstitute.org/blog/digital-dispatch-web-design-hirshhorn <div class="field field-name-body field-type-text-with-summary field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even" property="content:encoded"><p><a href="http://www.flickr.com/photos/51820118@N03/5498173468/" title="IMG_0607 by MLI-SI, on Flickr"><img src="http://farm6.static.flickr.com/5131/5498173468_8dbf4fc747.jpg" alt="IMG_0607" width="500" height="333" /></a></p><div><em>Teen designers work together to build a larger than life website main page</em></div><div><br /><div>Can an artwork inspire a website? <a href="http://artlabplus.si.edu/">ARTLAB+</a> teen designers are developing websites inspired by the <a href="http://hirshhorn.si.edu/">Hirshhorn Museum</a> art collections. After exploring the collections, teens identified a concept they could expand into a personal website expressing these ideas. Here's what teen designer Diamond had to say about her website idea: "Because I love black and white photos, I was really attracted to some of the pieces without color in the Hirshhorn. I'm thinking the theme of my website will be black and white. In some ways black and white images can be more powerful than color ones, especially when it comes to portrait photography of people, or some mediums such as watercolor, ink, and polaroid photography."</div><br /><div>Last week, the teens set the stage for their websites by building wireframe prototypes. To get started, the teens spent some time experimenting with this on a large scale. Teens were challenged to to build the main page of a website on the "computer screen": a large taped off square on the floor. Teen designers worked together to determine what components a music website for teens would have. Aside from the typical web elements - banner and navigation sidebars - the teens came up with some features to catch their audience's attention, including an artist of the day and lyrics of the day feature. These features were written on large pieces of paper and arranged on the "computer screen."</div><br /><div><a href="http://www.flickr.com/photos/51820118@N03/5498172322/" title="IMG_0600 by MLI-SI, on Flickr"><img src="http://farm6.static.flickr.com/5300/5498172322_265d713477.jpg" alt="IMG_0600" width="333" height="500" /></a></div><div>Teen designers used this large-scale exercise as the jumping off point to start building wireframes for their own websites. Here is Nazirah's <a href="http://cacoo.com/">Cacoo</a> wireframe for her photography website.</div><div><br /><a href="http://www.flickr.com/photos/51820118@N03/5498185868/" title="IMG_0644 by MLI-SI, on Flickr"><img src="http://farm6.static.flickr.com/5211/5498185868_de2e1f335a.jpg" alt="IMG_0644" width="500" height="333" /></a></div><div>Stay tuned for the teen designer's final work. In the meantime, check out the <a href="http://www.flickr.com/photos/51820118@N03/sets/72157626176893182/with/5498173468/">ARTLAB+ Web photo set</a>.</div><div> </div></div><div class="blogger-post-footer"><img src="https://blogger.googleusercontent.com/tracker/902885274664531497-4020430890742677612?l=newlearninginstitute.blogspot.com" alt="" width="1" height="1" /></div></div></div></div><div class="field field-name-field-blog-topics field-type-taxonomy-term-reference field-label-above"><div class="field-label">Topics:&nbsp;</div><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><a href="/blog-topics/nliatwork" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">NLIatWork</a></div><div class="field-item odd"><a href="/blog_topics/design_studio/index.html" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Design Studio</a></div><div class="field-item even"><a href="/blog-topics/museums" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Museums</a></div><div class="field-item odd"><a href="/blog-topics/digital-learning" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Digital Learning</a></div></div></div>Thu, 10 Mar 2011 18:34:00 +0000Tiffany McGettigan127 at http://www.newlearninginstitute.orghttp://www.newlearninginstitute.org/blog/digital-dispatch-web-design-hirshhorn#commentsDigital Dispatch: ARTLAB+ Video Program at the Hirshhorn Museumhttp://www.newlearninginstitute.org/blog/digital-dispatch-artlab-video-program-hirshhorn-museum <div class="field field-name-body field-type-text-with-summary field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even" property="content:encoded"><p><a href="http://www.flickr.com/photos/51820118@N03/5448503289/" title="artlab+videocollage1 by MLI-SI, on Flickr"><img src="http://farm6.static.flickr.com/5291/5448503289_2ced799960.jpg" alt="artlab+videocollage1" width="500" height="333" /></a></p><div> </div><p>The Smithsonian Institution <a href="http://hirshhorn.si.edu/">Hirshhorn Museum</a> kicked off their teen <a href="http://newlearninginstitute.blogspot.com/2010/11/design-studio-approach-mobile-learning.html">design studio programming</a> with the ARTLAB+ Video: City of Ruins workshop on January 24th. Ten teens are dedicated to being part of this teen design team. Their design challenge: to create a video series exhibition inspired by ruins in Washington, DC.</p><div><br /><div>Teens spent the first two weeks exploring the foundations of photography and videography through specific composition challenges.</div><br />Brianna took these two photos to illustrate how changing the camera angle can impact the way the subject is captured.</div><div> </div><p><a href="http://www.flickr.com/photos/51820118@N03/5448716859/" title="AnglesbyBrianna by MLI-SI, on Flickr"><img src="http://farm6.static.flickr.com/5299/5448716859_122e22c7dc.jpg" alt="AnglesbyBrianna" width="500" height="250" /></a></p><p> </p><div> </div><div>John took a first stab at camera moves, as shown in this short video. Don't miss his footage of Ardhy demonstrating "the truck."</div><div> </div><p><iframe src="http://player.vimeo.com/video/19987210" width="400" frameborder="0" height="300"></iframe></p><div>Stay tuned for more digital dispatches as the teen designers form production teams, plan video concepts, shoot and edit their work, then work together to create a museum exhibit displaying their video series.</div><div> </div><div><em>To see more images of teens at work check out the ARTLAB+ Video </em><a href="http://www.flickr.com/photos/51820118@N03/sets/72157625912112836/"><em>Flickr photo set</em></a><em>. </em></div><div><em>Learn more about other ARTLAB+ programming by following <a href="http://artlabplus.si.edu/">the ARTLAB+ blog</a>.</em></div><div class="blogger-post-footer"><img src="https://blogger.googleusercontent.com/tracker/902885274664531497-5675590304746765539?l=newlearninginstitute.blogspot.com" alt="" width="1" height="1" /></div></div></div></div><div class="field field-name-field-blog-topics field-type-taxonomy-term-reference field-label-above"><div class="field-label">Topics:&nbsp;</div><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><a href="/blog-topics/nliatwork" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">NLIatWork</a></div><div class="field-item odd"><a href="/blog_topics/design_studio/index.html" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Design Studio</a></div><div class="field-item even"><a href="/blog-topics/project-based-learning" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Project Based Learning</a></div><div class="field-item odd"><a href="/blog-topics/technology-education" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Technology Education</a></div><div class="field-item even"><a href="/blog-topics/museums" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Museums</a></div><div class="field-item odd"><a href="/blog-topics/digital-learning" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Digital Learning</a></div></div></div>Wed, 16 Feb 2011 22:02:00 +0000Tiffany McGettigan134 at http://www.newlearninginstitute.orghttp://www.newlearninginstitute.org/blog/digital-dispatch-artlab-video-program-hirshhorn-museum#commentsDesign Studio: A Practitioner’s Perspective.http://www.newlearninginstitute.org/blog/design-studio-practitioner%E2%80%99s-perspective <div class="field field-name-body field-type-text-with-summary field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even" property="content:encoded"><p><a href="http://3.bp.blogspot.com/_AJz3zglnLrs/TORvhQYbFcI/AAAAAAAABa8/aRfgw9UMRCI/s1600/artlab.JPG" onblur="try {parent.deselectBloggerImageGracefully();} catch(e) {}"><img src="http://3.bp.blogspot.com/_AJz3zglnLrs/TORvhQYbFcI/AAAAAAAABa8/aRfgw9UMRCI/s1600/artlab.JPG" alt="" style="margin: 0px auto 10px; display: block; text-align: center; cursor: pointer;" class="feature-top" id="BLOGGER_PHOTO_ID_5540676058696324546" /></a><br /><br />What if youth had an opportunity to both visit a museum<span style="font-style: italic;"> and</span> contribute to an exhibit? What would their experience look like? Yesterday, I spoke with Nancy Chou, who helps design programs for the <a href="http://newlearninginstitute.org/digital-media-programs/museum-programs/smithsonian-institution.html">Mobile Learning Institute at the Smithsonian</a>. She has helped develop a couple of programs that follow the design studio format I introduced in a <a href="http://newlearninginstitute.blogspot.com/2010/11/design-studio-approach-mobile-learning.html">previous post</a>, <span style="font-style: italic;">City of Ruins</span> and <span style="font-style: italic;">ArtScape</span>. When we talked, she highlighted the importance of audience, community contribution, and informed choice in the <a href="http://newlearninginstitute.org/digital-media-programs/museum-programs/smithsonian-institution.html">Mobile Learning Institute at the Smithsonian</a>’s programs. Below I’ve listed short program descriptions for City of Ruins and ArtScape, as well as excerpts from my interview with Nancy.<br /><br /><span style="font-weight: bold;">City of Ruins</span><br />Youth participants met for twice a week this month and last to contribute to a Mobile Video Series for the Smithsonian’s Hirshhorn Museum, part of a series of films based on the Cyprien Gaillard and Mario Garcia Torres exhibition. They reflected on these pieces, traveled off-site to view local “ruins” in person, and spoke with the visiting artist collective, Semiconductor. The short videos created by participants offer teen-developed interpretations of artwork and promote critical thinking to encourage viewers to build a deeper connection with the art.<br /><br /><span style="font-weight: bold;">ArtScape</span><br />Working in teams of 10 to 15 designers on two Fridays this month, youth participants designed an online space for other teens to post examples of art from their own communities. For this program, they are playing a key role in designing the space, launching it, and developing a plan for how to attract and sustain youth contributors to the site.</p><p><br /><br /><br /></p><ul style="font-weight: bold;"><li>Nancy, what is the efficacy of the design studio approach?</li></ul><p> </p><p>“Right now, we are implementing a design studio approach in the context of a museum. Putting young people in the role of creating media and activities for youth visitors in a museum is really central to what we’re doing. The problem is that in the current museum setting, young people may visit museums, but their level of engagement may not be as deep as their potential. For instance, they might text their friends while looking at a Calder exhibit. Alternately, they could be listening to a curator who is giving a talk and not make meaning from or connections to the objects they see. Our vision is to redefine this core experience for youth visitors. How do we do that? We put young people in the seat of creating media and activities that can eventually be offered to other young people who visit the museum on their own, on field trips, or through other programs.<br /><br />The design studio format provides a structured approach to work with young visitors to allow them to become producers, designers, and curators for other youth who visit museums. This experience gives young people in the program an audience: their peers. Knowing that what they create will be used by others transforms the whole experience.<br />…<br />Another major component of this format is that it creates a microcosm of a real-world experience. Young people work collectively to achieve a specific design task. <a href="http://4.bp.blogspot.com/_AJz3zglnLrs/TOrIyWjyIRI/AAAAAAAABbQ/ty468dRy28E/s1600/Islands%2Bof%2BExpertise.JPG" onblur="try {parent.deselectBloggerImageGracefully();} catch(e) {}"><img src="http://4.bp.blogspot.com/_AJz3zglnLrs/TOrIyWjyIRI/AAAAAAAABbQ/ty468dRy28E/s320/Islands%2Bof%2BExpertise.JPG" alt="" style="margin: 0pt 0pt 10px 10px; float: right; cursor: pointer; width: 320px; height: 240px;" id="BLOGGER_PHOTO_ID_5542463058807496978" border="0" /></a>If the design task is to create an exhibit that will be shown in a museum, participants perform specific roles, be it exhibit organizer, video producer, marketing team member, or material/artifact team member. The participants’ relationship to each other is interdependent but also task-oriented. In this way, participants are able to pursue individual interests, as well as utilize a certain level of prior knowledge to become experts. The whole experience creates an interdependent collective group of teams working to do something that will be used in museums. And, as experts, the participants see how their knowledge will sustain the survival of the collective group.<br /><br />In contributing – by feeding back to the museum ecosystem instead of having an isolated experience – young participants are able to layer an understanding of how their individual role contributes to other human beings in their community.”<br /><br /> </p><ul style="font-weight: bold;"><li>How does this approach differ from programs developed in the past?</li></ul><p> </p><p>“The New Learning Institute’s current pedagogical approach is a response to the general shift in the understanding of how young people learn [see additional resources below]. The current field of digital media learning is not centered on the tools; it’s about how the tools shape-shift or reimagine the way students learn. Utilizing the design studio format is one approach we use to create effective learning ecologies. <a href="http://newlearninginstitute.blogspot.com/2010/11/design-studio-approach-mobile-learning.html">Roles of adults, learning spaces, rituals, and design principles</a> are all ways we provide pathways for young people to use tools as tools, not as the be-all and end-all outcome of their learning. A variety of methods can each contribute a useful “ingredient” to this “recipe.” Over time, the New Learning Institute continually refines the recipe for an approach that works.<br /> </p><blockquote><br />“We’re more interested in creating a culture that is conducive to learning. We take ideas of new learning and create a space that reflects that culture.”</blockquote><p> </p><p>The New Learning Institute’s initial approach involved integrating our methods (primarily digital storytelling) into the classroom culture, in a school setting that was predominately teacher-centered. Now, as digital media has increasingly become an integral part of young people’s lives, it’s clear that the way that youth learn with it is not a one-off; it’s an integrated part of their learning. In real life, we choose which tool is best. Today the New Learning Institute goes beyond digital storytelling to provide a menu of different tools. We give students and professional development workshop participants options so that they can determine which tool or tools fit best with the design or problem-solving task at hand. Now, there is more of a strategic approach to provide a menu of options, whether it’s podcasting, Photoshop, or different mobile devices. Once the foundation is laid, then participants choose the option with our support. NLI staff are facilitators, not just people providing a vertical direction of knowledge.”<br /><br /><span style="font-weight: bold;">Thanks!</span><br />Thanks to Nancy for talking with me and taking the time to explain all of the exciting developments in the New Learning Institute’s programs.<br /><span style="font-weight: bold;">Additional resources on design studios and new media learning:
</span><br /> </p><ul><li><a href="http://www.amazon.com/Video-Games-Teach-Learning-Literacy/dp/1403961697">Gee, J. P. (2007). What video games have to teach us about learning and literacy. New York: Palgrave Macmillan.</a></li><li><a href="http://mitpress.mit.edu/books/full_pdfs/Hanging_Out.pdf">Ito, M. (2010). Hanging out, messing around, and geeking out: Kids living and learning with new media. Cambridge, Mass: MIT Press.</a></li><li><a href="http://education.waikato.ac.nz/research/files/etpc/files/2010v9n1art7.pdf">Matthews, J. (2010). Using a studio-based pedagogy to engage students in the design of mobile-based media. English Teaching: Practice and Critique, 9(1), 87-102.</a></li><li><a href="http://dmlcentral.net/">DML Central</a></li><li><a href="http://projecthdesign.org/">Project H</a></li><li><a href="http://www.gameslearningsociety.org/">Games Learning Society</a></li></ul><div class="blogger-post-footer"><img src="https://blogger.googleusercontent.com/tracker/902885274664531497-1388189317869874079?l=newlearninginstitute.blogspot.com" alt="" width="1" height="1" /></div></div></div></div><div class="field field-name-field-blog-topics field-type-taxonomy-term-reference field-label-above"><div class="field-label">Topics:&nbsp;</div><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><a href="/blog-topics/nliatwork" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">NLIatWork</a></div><div class="field-item odd"><a href="/blog_topics/design_studio/index.html" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Design Studio</a></div><div class="field-item even"><a href="/blog-topics/project-based-learning" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Project Based Learning</a></div><div class="field-item odd"><a href="/blog-topics/museums" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Museums</a></div><div class="field-item even"><a href="/blog-topics/digital-learning" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Digital Learning</a></div><div class="field-item odd"><a href="/blog_topics/21st_century_skills/index.html" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">21st Century Skills</a></div></div></div>Tue, 16 Nov 2010 19:12:00 +0000Sarah Davis156 at http://www.newlearninginstitute.orghttp://www.newlearninginstitute.org/blog/design-studio-practitioner%E2%80%99s-perspective#commentsThe Design Studio Approach: Mobile Learning Institute at the Smithsonianhttp://www.newlearninginstitute.org/blog/design-studio-approach-mobile-learning-institute-smithsonian <div class="field field-name-body field-type-text-with-summary field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even" property="content:encoded"><p><a href="http://2.bp.blogspot.com/_AJz3zglnLrs/TORy94ckUNI/AAAAAAAABbE/XAqCvVI9jR0/s1600/artlab%2B2.JPG" onblur="try {parent.deselectBloggerImageGracefully();} catch(e) {}"><br /><img src="http://2.bp.blogspot.com/_AJz3zglnLrs/TORy94ckUNI/AAAAAAAABbE/XAqCvVI9jR0/s1600/artlab%2B2.JPG" style="margin: 0px auto 10px auto; display: block; text-align: center; cursor: pointer;" class="feature-top" border="0" /></a><br /><br />How do we create a learning culture that puts the young person at the center of the experience, that inspires creativity and innovation, and that actualizes learning by doing – not in theory only, but in practice? The design studio style of learning that is central to the <a href="http://hirshhorn.si.edu/">Hirshhorn Museum </a>programs presented by the <a href="http://newlearninginstitute.org/digital-media-programs/museum-programs/smithsonian-institution.html#">Mobile Learning Institute at the Smithsonian </a>is an example of how museums can engage visitors in this way.<br /><br /><strong>The Design Studio Learning Environment</strong><br />Design studios can be successful in developing rich and engaging learning experiences for the 21st century learner. Core components of successful design studios include: project-based work, incorporation of design solutions, formal and informal critique, consideration of issues, thinking with examples and thinking about the whole, creative use of constraints, and emphasizing design media.1 In sum, the combined elements of an effective design studio cultivate a learning space where youth are active participants and problem-solvers, where adults play the role of facilitators and experts, and where learning is experiential.2<br /><br /><strong>The Hirshhorn Design Studio Learning Space</strong><br />The Hirshhorn’s “ArtLab+” (the physical learning space) is a digital media studio that incorporates the following characteristics:<br /><br />• Flexibility to encourage both small and large group collaboration<br />• Youth relevance<br />• Flexible and modular design</p><p> </p><p>The tables and chairs in ArtLab+ are purposely arranged in a way that reflects a studio instead of a classroom, with table/chair “modules” that frequently shift to accommodate specific tasks. For example, tables were positioned as one large rectangular work station on the first day of the workshop so that participants were able to work on brainstorming ideas for their projects.<br /><br /><strong>Design Principles</strong><br />Design principles refer to the specific set of values that shape what takes place in the physical space/studio environment. Characteristics include:<br /><br />• Participant assumption of roles/identities<br />• Short iterative cycles<br />• Frequent critique sessions<br />• Dispersed community<br />• Skills as strategies<br />• Distributed knowledge<br />• Facilitators as co-designers<br /><br />Where a mobile video series component is the central part of the final collective project, participants can begin with exploring photography, since the core skills such as framing, lighting, etc. are closely related to videography. Participants may start out in a short task that involves going out to take a photo using the Rule of Thirds. The next design cycle may involve the students applying this skill to a five-second video capture of the same object with panning and zooming.<br /><br /><strong>Rituals <a href="http://1.bp.blogspot.com/_AJz3zglnLrs/TN2t5-H66OI/AAAAAAAABZY/0dna8pjVXZQ/s1600/directional%2Bforce.JPG"><img src="http://1.bp.blogspot.com/_AJz3zglnLrs/TN2t5-H66OI/AAAAAAAABZY/0dna8pjVXZQ/s200/directional%2Bforce.JPG" alt="" style="margin: 0px 0px 10px 10px; width: 164px; float: right; height: 200px;" id="BLOGGER_PHOTO_ID_5538774328175945954" border="0" /></a></strong><br />Rituals refer to a specific set of social practices that are integral to all Mobile Learning Institute at the Smithsonian’s Hirshhorn Museum programs. These rituals include:<br /><br />• Community circles<br />• Design task cards<br />• Community design board<br />• Design journals<br /><br /><a href="http://4.bp.blogspot.com/_AJz3zglnLrs/TN2ttKfY4AI/AAAAAAAABZQ/UNHx1LvURqo/s1600/Rule%2Bof%2BThirds.JPG"><img src="http://4.bp.blogspot.com/_AJz3zglnLrs/TN2ttKfY4AI/AAAAAAAABZQ/UNHx1LvURqo/s200/Rule%2Bof%2BThirds.JPG" alt="" style="margin: 0px 10px 10px 0px; width: 164px; float: left; height: 200px;" id="BLOGGER_PHOTO_ID_5538774108157304834" border="0" /></a>Design task cards in these programs fall into two categories: <em>Skill Building Cards</em> and <em>Content Understanding Cards</em>. Skill Building Cards are a series of cards geared toward developing expertise around specific new-media skills, such as video capture and editing. Content Understanding Cards are directed toward developing understanding of a certain content goal, such as art interpretation. Within each of these categories, there are three to five cards that focus on specific participant-centered activities. Cards are ranked by skill development. For instance, after students understand and apply the “Rule of Thirds,” they might be ready to advance to “directional force.”</p><p> </p><p>In the next entry, we’ll take a look at some of the ways the New Learning Institute has incorporated the design studio approach and how we are shifting our methods to accommodate the new media learner of today.<br /><br /><strong>Additional resources on design studios:</strong><br />1: S. Kuhn, The Software Design Studio: an exploration, IEEE Software, March/April, 1988.<br />2: J. Matthews, “Using a studio-based pedagogy to engage students in the design of mobile-based media,” English Teaching: Practice and Critique, May 2010: 88.</p><div class="blogger-post-footer"><img src="https://blogger.googleusercontent.com/tracker/902885274664531497-5247632550233573922?l=newlearninginstitute.blogspot.com" alt="" width="1" height="1" /></div></div></div></div><div class="field field-name-field-blog-topics field-type-taxonomy-term-reference field-label-above"><div class="field-label">Topics:&nbsp;</div><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><a href="/blog-topics/nliatwork" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">NLIatWork</a></div><div class="field-item odd"><a href="/blog_topics/design_studio/index.html" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Design Studio</a></div><div class="field-item even"><a href="/blog-topics/project-based-learning" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Project Based Learning</a></div><div class="field-item odd"><a href="/blog-topics/museums" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Museums</a></div><div class="field-item even"><a href="/blog-topics/digital-learning" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Digital Learning</a></div><div class="field-item odd"><a href="/blog_topics/21st_century_skills/index.html" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">21st Century Skills</a></div></div></div>Fri, 12 Nov 2010 17:52:00 +0000Sarah Davis157 at http://www.newlearninginstitute.orghttp://www.newlearninginstitute.org/blog/design-studio-approach-mobile-learning-institute-smithsonian#comments