New Learning Institute - Technology Integrationhttp://newlearninginstitute.org/blog-topics/technology-integration enBiodiversity Quest Program Launches in Chicagohttp://newlearninginstitute.org/blog/biodiversity-quest-program-launches-chicago <div class="field field-name-body field-type-text-with-summary field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even" property="content:encoded"><p><a href="http://4.bp.blogspot.com/-C7TXPveT7xk/Ta9vKQuBwBI/AAAAAAAABQY/gZ3jf55B0do/s1600/P1040476.JPG" onblur="try {parent.deselectBloggerImageGracefully();} catch(e) {}"><img src="http://4.bp.blogspot.com/-C7TXPveT7xk/Ta9vKQuBwBI/AAAAAAAABQY/gZ3jf55B0do/s400/P1040476.JPG" alt="" style="display: block; margin: 0px auto 10px; text-align: center; cursor: hand; width: 400px; height: 300px;" id="BLOGGER_PHOTO_ID_5597815083922210834" border="0" /></a></p><div> </div><div><em>Young visitors at a zoo run from exhibit to exhibit fascinated to see animals up close they've only seen in pictures or on TV. They pause to watch an animal for a minute or two and then are off to the next one. A placard or an encounter with a member of the zoo staff offers them some more information about the animals, but would it be possible to use mobile technology to help these young visitors learn even more by making connections between the exhibits they visit? </em></div><div> </div><div><a href="http://newlearninginstitute.org/">New Learning Institute</a> has partnered with several organizations to create the Biodiversity Quest program in Chicago to challenge young people to create mobile experiences, also known as quests, at <a href="http://www.lpzoo.org/">Lincoln Park Zoo</a>. Designed in collaboration with <a href="http://www.rootsandshoots.org/">Jane Goodall's Roots &amp; Shoots </a> and the <a href="http://www.arkive.org/">ARKive project</a>, these youth-designed quests will aim to educate other young visitors about endangered species, as well as show them how they can take action to help save the planet's threatened and endangered species.</div><div> </div><div>Biodiversity Quest is an eight-week afterschool program held at Bouchet Academy on the South Side of Chicago. Over the course of the workshops, sixth and seventh grade students from Bouchet will design the mobile quests to be played at Lincoln Park Zoo. The quests will each have a theme that leads other young visitors around the Zoo and helps them draw connections between exhibits. As an example, a group might design a quest that guides visitors to the exhibits of several species that share threatened status because of common threats to their habitats.</div><div> </div><div>NLI has worked closely with partners to design a program framework that provides an engaging, hands-on experience for the youth participants. Jane Goodall's Roots &amp; Shoots program helped structure the workshops with their <a href="http://www.rootsandshoots.org/aboutus/model">model</a> of moving young people from knowledge to compassion and into taking action, making a difference for people, animals, and the environment around them. The students in the Biodiversity Quest program begin by learning about biodiversity, conservation biology, and how species become threatened or endangered. They then connect their new awareness to their own interests by choosing species that they find most intriguing to use as the focus of their quests. Then the young participants take action by conducting research and including in their quest how a visitor to Lincoln Park Zoo could help the cause of a threatened or endangered species which may be found across the globe or as close as their own backyard.</div><div> </div><div><a href="http://www.arkive.org">ARKive</a> brings to the Biodiversity Quest a wealth of endangered species media, biological information and <a href="http://www.arkive.org/education/resources">educational resources</a>. This unique global initiative is leading the 'virtual' conservation effort by finding, sorting, cataloguing and digitizing threatened species multimedia into individual species profiles. ARKive.org is a user-friendly and searchable treasure trove of professional wildlife photos, videos, and biological information for over 12,000 threatened species (and still growing!). The participants in the Biodiversity Quest workshops will build their quests using ARKive biological information and will have access to over 80,000 stunning wildlife photos and videos from the ARKive website. Adding this rich media to the quests will allow the young designers to enhance the experience of zoo visitors.</div><div> </div><div>The Biodiversity Quest program launched in Chicago on March 22nd. Working in a collaborative environment, participants will engage in project-based learning that includes an authentic outcome : mobile quests that will be shared with other visitors at Lincoln Park Zoo. Over the next few months we will post Digital Dispatches describing the workshops and the progress the young participants are making on their quests. Check back for an update on their first two weeks soon!</div><div class="blogger-post-footer"><img src="https://blogger.googleusercontent.com/tracker/902885274664531497-2648119031854286599?l=newlearninginstitute.blogspot.com" alt="" width="1" height="1" /></div></div></div></div><div class="field field-name-field-blog-topics field-type-taxonomy-term-reference field-label-above"><div class="field-label">Topics:&nbsp;</div><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><a href="/blog_topics/technology_integration/index.html" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Technology Integration</a></div><div class="field-item odd"><a href="/blog-topics/nliatwork" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">NLIatWork</a></div><div class="field-item even"><a href="/blog-topics/digital-literacy" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Digital Literacy</a></div><div class="field-item odd"><a href="/blog_topics/design_studio/index.html" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Design Studio</a></div><div class="field-item even"><a href="/blog_topics/project_based_learning/index.html" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Project Based Learning</a></div><div class="field-item odd"><a href="/blog-topics/digital-learning" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Digital Learning</a></div><div class="field-item even"><a href="/blog_topics/21st_century_skills/index.html" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">21st Century Skills</a></div></div></div>Wed, 20 Apr 2011 21:15:00 +0000Nancy Chou122 at http://newlearninginstitute.orghttp://newlearninginstitute.org/blog/biodiversity-quest-program-launches-chicago#commentsTool Review: Edmodohttp://newlearninginstitute.org/blog/tool-review-edmodo <div class="field field-name-body field-type-text-with-summary field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even" property="content:encoded"><p><a href="https://lh5.googleusercontent.com/_6Zln-7k5oag/TaTWtwrZyZI/AAAAAAAAAI4/ET-K3qQgv70/edmodo%20home.jpg" onblur="try {parent.deselectBloggerImageGracefully();} catch(e) {}"><img src="https://lh5.googleusercontent.com/_6Zln-7k5oag/TaTWtwrZyZI/AAAAAAAAAI4/ET-K3qQgv70/edmodo%20home.jpg" alt="" style="display: block; margin: 0px auto 10px; text-align: center; cursor: hand; width: 600px; height: 297px;" class="feature-top" border="0" /></a><br /><br />The school where I used to teach blocked Facebook and Myspace, and this is not uncommon; many of the teachers I speak to report that their districts have similar policies. Some cite concerns that these social network destinations are too tempting for students to access during the school day, that they distract youth from concentrating on their school work. While this is a factor, the main reason these sites are blocked is safety. School districts are liable for student actions, so if youth are uploading inappropriate media or participating in online harassment, the school could be held legally responsible. The cheapest and easiest solution is to block social network access from campus. While this reaction is understandable, it’s also unfortunate, because social networks provide students with a communication platform that engages them. Many educators understand this, and so it’s gratifying to see that social networking platforms are being developed specifically for education.<br /><br />Today we’ll take a look at <a href="http://www.edmodo.com/">Edmodo</a>, a free social network for educators and their students that provides a safer alternative for online communication, collaboration, and sharing.<br /><br /><span style="font-weight: bold;">Features</span><br />Edmodo is a safer alternative because teachers control who joins their online class groups; students have to be explicitly invited in order to gain access to class group features. All activity settings default to private as well. Parents can also be invited to join; but again, the teacher has full control over group membership.<br /><br />Edmodo’s user interface and actions resemble Facebook closely, so students and teachers alike should find posting messages and links very intuitive. This isn’t a regular social network, though: it knows its audience. Teachers can post notes, alerts, assignments (complete with attachments and due dates that automatically populate the calendar), and polls—all of which can be sent to individual members or groups (classes or clubs). Group members can comment on them, extending the conversation around the shared resources—this could be a great way to prompt youth to evaluate the credibility of web links, <a href="http://www.youthmediareporter.org/2010/06/fuzzy_logic_why_students_need.html%20">a skill they really need to practice</a>. These featured posts all populate a news feed on the recipient’s home page.<br /><br />Separate from the news feed are the calendar, grades, and library tools. The calendar allows the educator to manually create events, although any assignment due dates listed using the assignment feature will automatically be transferred to the calendar. These can be specific to a group, for the teacher, or for an individual student. A gradebook is automatically generated for each group created, but it lists only those assignments that have been created and submitted through the Edmodo interface (at least as far as I can tell). The library allows educators to create online information warehouses for their own personal use, as well as student use. Document and web resources can be organized in folders that can be shared with class groups.<br /><br />There are <a href="http://help.edmodo.com/teacher/">many helpful resources</a> to guide new users through all of the features, some of which are also available in Spanish. Edmodo also has its eye on school- and district-wide implementations. They host regular webinars on topics such as “Intro to Edmodo,” “20 Ways to Use Edmodo,” and “Edmodo for Schools and Districts: Making a Plan for Widescale Use.” More information for school and district IT professionals can be found on their <a href="http://help.edmodo.com/schooldistrict/">School and District Guide</a> page.<br /><br /><a href="https://lh6.googleusercontent.com/_6Zln-7k5oag/TaTWtyJ64MI/AAAAAAAAAI8/w4-Gg4TpJDc/edmodo%20dash.jpg" onblur="try {parent.deselectBloggerImageGracefully();} catch(e) {}"><img src="https://lh6.googleusercontent.com/_6Zln-7k5oag/TaTWtyJ64MI/AAAAAAAAAI8/w4-Gg4TpJDc/edmodo%20dash.jpg" alt="" style="display: block; margin: 0px auto 10px; text-align: center; cursor: hand; width: 600px; height: 407px;" class="feature-top" border="0" /></a><br /><br /><span style="font-weight: bold;">Sample Classroom &amp; Youth Program Applications</span><br />This is the section where I usually brainstorm some possible uses of the new media tool I’m reviewing for various academic disciplines, but seeing as Edmodo is a management tool and not geared toward knowledge creation, here are some ideas for why and how I would use it with my students.</p><p> </p><ul><li><span style="font-weight: bold;">Differentiation:</span>Any group of students will have young people who require very different things to progress in their skill development and knowledge acquisition. Edmodo makes it very easy to send targeted information to individual students.<ul><li>Use private notes to post web links that remediate, support, or extend the topic being discussed in class.</li><li>Use private calendar dates to create reminders for students who require smaller, more frequent deadlines to manage their work and stay on task.</li><li>Some students with special learning needs find it much easier to communicate with others through online interfaces, which also benefit quieter, shyer students as well. Edmodo provides them with an easier way to contribute to class discussion.</li></ul></li><li><span style="font-weight: bold;">Community Building: </span>The success of a class rests largely on the development of trust in their peers and their teacher, and trust is built through shared experience, met expectations, and meeting the needs of the individual community members.<ul><li>Use notes to send interesting and funny links to the group or individual students.</li><li>Post opinion polls that solicit feedback on lessons and choice of activities for future lessons, and to check for group understanding of a topic. By allowing students a chance to participate in decision-making for the group, you’ll help them feel more invested in their class community.</li><li>Encourage students to post relevant links and documents with the group, and urge everyone to comment respectfully on these resources.</li></ul></li><li><span style="font-weight: bold;">Documentation:</span>How often have you had a fabulous class discussion but no artifacts to remember it by? What about that amazing paper Juan wrote five years ago that you’d love to use as an exemplar for your students this year, except you can’t find it in your box of student work? Edmodo’s online interface creates a record of what you all worked together to accomplish over the course of the year.<ul><li>Use the library feature to create student portfolios. Students upload work according to whatever guidelines you establish, which, if shared with the group, makes peer portfolio review a very simple matter.</li><li>Having student work submitted online, along with written student comments, makes it very easy for teachers to see what worked and what did not with a particular lesson. Refining lesson and unit materials becomes much more simple.</li></ul></li><li><span style="font-weight: bold;">Parent Involvement:</span> Teachers can invite parents to groups, which can be an easy way for them to see firsthand what’s happening in class. Between work and caring for their family, parents don’t always have time to check in with their children’s teachers as often as they’d like. Give them an option to join the class community.</li></ul><p><br /><br /></p><p><span style="font-weight: bold;">Breakdown</span></p><ul><li><span style="font-weight: bold;">Price Structure:</span> Free</li><li>Pros:<ul><li>Robust, practical tool set for teachers and students</li><li>Facebook-like interface makes it very intuitive for most users</li><li>Strong privacy controls</li><li>Easy student account setup</li><li>Mobile apps available for those with smart phones</li></ul></li><li><span style="font-weight: bold;">Cons:</span><ul><li>Can’t add assignments from within the Grade feature</li></ul></li></ul><p><br /><br /></p><p>Do you use Edmodo with your youth? Do you have any activity suggestions, tips, or tricks to share? Comment below or contact us!</p><div class="blogger-post-footer"><img src="https://blogger.googleusercontent.com/tracker/902885274664531497-1265232558836902834?l=newlearninginstitute.blogspot.com" alt="" width="1" height="1" /></div></div></div></div><div class="field field-name-field-blog-topics field-type-taxonomy-term-reference field-label-above"><div class="field-label">Topics:&nbsp;</div><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><a href="/blog_topics/technology_integration/index.html" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Technology Integration</a></div><div class="field-item odd"><a href="/blog_topics/social_networking/index.html" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Social Networking</a></div><div class="field-item even"><a href="/blog_topics/tools/index.html" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Tools</a></div><div class="field-item odd"><a href="/blog-topics/web-20" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Web 2.0</a></div><div class="field-item even"><a href="/blog-topics/community" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Community</a></div><div class="field-item odd"><a href="/blog_topics/mobile_learning/index.html" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Mobile Learning</a></div><div class="field-item even"><a href="/blog-topics/digital-learning" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Digital Learning</a></div></div></div>Tue, 12 Apr 2011 22:37:00 +0000Jennifer Dick123 at http://newlearninginstitute.orghttp://newlearninginstitute.org/blog/tool-review-edmodo#commentsTool Review: Figmenthttp://newlearninginstitute.org/blog/tool-review-figment <div class="field field-name-body field-type-text-with-summary field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even" property="content:encoded"><p><a href="https://lh4.googleusercontent.com/_6Zln-7k5oag/TZ470vmPD6I/AAAAAAAAAIg/OSdox1nwbgs/figment%20home.jpg" onblur="try {parent.deselectBloggerImageGracefully();} catch(e) {}"><img src="https://lh4.googleusercontent.com/_6Zln-7k5oag/TZ470vmPD6I/AAAAAAAAAIg/OSdox1nwbgs/figment%20home.jpg" alt="" style="display: block; margin: 0px auto 10px; text-align: center; cursor: hand; width: 600px; height: 261px;" class="feature-top" border="0" /></a><br />Popular culture would have us believe that writers work alone in a silent room, perhaps with a precisely placed picture window in front of the desk, and that their text emerges Venus-like--wholly formed, perfect and complete.<br /><br />Would that this were so.<br /><br />As a former English teacher, I know how hard it is to convince students that writing is a process that requires community. Writing the first draft is hard enough, and when kids know that no one but their teacher is going to see what they compose, it can be difficult to motivate them to go through rewrites. “After all, it’s just a school writing assignment,” they may think. “No one’s going to see how good or bad it is.” Without any exposure to the world of professional writing, students may fail to see the authenticity of the writing process; that yes, real writers do get feedback, revise, get more feedback, revise again, and so on. Teachers have tried to cope with this by incorporating writing circles into their classroom practice, but this presents challenges as well. Students know their classmates. While some will want to try to impress their peers, others may feel so comfortable with their friends (and their friends’ opinions) that they won’t take the task seriously. What’s a teacher to do?<br /><br />Well, the web 2.0 and social media revolutions have changed this by providing us a global audience and free platforms to share our work with anyone who cares to follow the conversation. We’re all content creators these days, as <a href="http://books.google.com/books?id=T1i_nQrg-vkC&amp;printsec=frontcover&amp;dq=henry+jenkins&amp;hl=en&amp;ei=X-idTdfwK42Ttwe9j_nHBA&amp;sa=X&amp;oi=book_result&amp;ct=result&amp;resnum=5&amp;ved=0CDwQ6AEwBA#v=onepage&amp;q&amp;f=fals">Henry Jenkins</a> says. Blogging can be a great way for students to get their writing published, but there are a few tacit assumptions about blog posts: they are meant for the entire world to see, and they are polished pieces of writing. So using a blogging platform as a means of collecting feedback about one’s writing isn’t always the best solution to recreating the writers’ circle concept online.<br /><br />Enter <a href="http://figment.com/">Figment</a>, a free online community designed for writers to share their works in progress, read what other authors are writing, and share their thoughts.<br /><br /><a href="https://lh4.googleusercontent.com/_6Zln-7k5oag/TZ471fxU4oI/AAAAAAAAAIk/cSFyGInCFaQ/figment%20text%20homepage.jpg" onblur="try {parent.deselectBloggerImageGracefully();} catch(e) {}"><img src="https://lh4.googleusercontent.com/_6Zln-7k5oag/TZ471fxU4oI/AAAAAAAAAIk/cSFyGInCFaQ/figment%20text%20homepage.jpg" alt="" style="display: block; margin: 0px auto 10px; text-align: center; cursor: hand; width: 600px; height: 342px;" class="feature-top" border="0" /></a><br /><span style="font-weight: bold;">Features</span><br />The Figment writing interface is very simple: text window with buttons for boldface, underline, italicize, strikethrough, and numbered and bulleted lists. There is no auto-save, so be sure to click the Save Edit button often. You add details about your work, including a description, keywords, summary, and genre. Figment provides seven covers to choose from (you can also upload your own image) and two possible page designs. Works can have multiple chapters, which can be reordered by dragging them up or down in the left-hand margin.<br /><br />The fun starts once you’ve published your first draft. Figment has a lovely dashboard for each of your works that displays your book cover, name, chapter and word count breakdown, book description, and a preview of your text. The dashboard also shows how many people have “hearted,” commented, and reviewed or shared your book via Twitter or Facebook. Readers can also award your book various responses to a “This story made me…” question: wow, blush, shiver, cry, laugh. All of these features provide quick and easy ways for people to respond to your work. After knocking out a (very) brief foreword and the beginnings of a first chapter for my test text, I confess, I’m actually feeling somewhat motivated to continue my personal writing, despite the fact that I’ve been writing a lot for work lately. If it motivates me, I expect it will also motivate your students.<br /><br /><span style="font-weight: bold;">Sample Classroom &amp; Youth Program Applications</span></p><p> </p><ul><li><span style="font-weight: bold;">English Language Arts:</span> Have students post their narrative, fictional, and/or autobiographical writing assignments on Figment, and then give them class time to read and review each other’s work.</li><li><span style="font-weight: bold;">History:</span> While studying a specific event, ask students to write a brief fictional first-person narrative of someone experiencing that event.</li><li><span style="font-weight: bold;">Science:</span> Ask students to write a short story from a molecule’s or atom’s point of view, tracing its journey throughout a specific process. For example, students might pretend they are a water molecule traveling through the water cycle.</li></ul><p><br /><br /></p><p><span style="font-weight: bold;">Breakdown</span></p><p> </p><ul><li><span style="font-weight: bold;">Price Structure:</span> Free</li><li><span style="font-weight: bold;">Pros:</span><ul><li>Allows authors to work on their project anywhere there’s an Internet connection (or cell signal, for those with smart phones).</li><li>Authors retain full copyright of their works posted to Figment, but Figment has the right to display the work for as long as the author keeps it stored in Figment.</li><li>Participation badges provide incentive for users to increase their participation in the community.</li><li>No anonymous comments: conversation tends to stay civil.</li><li>Has a <a href="http://figment.com/educators">bi-monthly newsletter</a> for educators.</li></ul></li><li><span style="font-weight: bold;">Cons</span>:<ul><li>No automatic saving.</li><li>No built-in spell check.</li></ul></li></ul><p> </p><p>Do you use Figment with your youth? Do you have any activity suggestions, tips, or tricks to share? Comment below or contact us!</p><div class="blogger-post-footer"><img src="https://blogger.googleusercontent.com/tracker/902885274664531497-8971343068844890302?l=newlearninginstitute.blogspot.com" alt="" width="1" height="1" /></div></div></div></div><div class="field field-name-field-blog-topics field-type-taxonomy-term-reference field-label-above"><div class="field-label">Topics:&nbsp;</div><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><a href="/blog_topics/technology_integration/index.html" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Technology Integration</a></div><div class="field-item odd"><a href="/blog_topics/social_networking/index.html" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Social Networking</a></div><div class="field-item even"><a href="/blog_topics/tools/index.html" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Tools</a></div><div class="field-item odd"><a href="/blog-topics/web-20" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Web 2.0</a></div><div class="field-item even"><a href="/blog_topics/21st_century_skills/index.html" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">21st Century Skills</a></div></div></div>Thu, 07 Apr 2011 22:22:00 +0000Jennifer Dick124 at http://newlearninginstitute.orghttp://newlearninginstitute.org/blog/tool-review-figment#commentsTool Review: Diigohttp://newlearninginstitute.org/blog/tool-review-diigo <div class="field field-name-body field-type-text-with-summary field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even" property="content:encoded"><p><a href="https://lh4.googleusercontent.com/_6Zln-7k5oag/TXa6MVLE5iI/AAAAAAAAAHY/p8_LJP01o5U/diigo%20home.jpg" onblur="try {parent.deselectBloggerImageGracefully();} catch(e) {}"><img src="https://lh4.googleusercontent.com/_6Zln-7k5oag/TXa6MVLE5iI/AAAAAAAAAHY/p8_LJP01o5U/diigo%20home.jpg" alt="" style="display: block; margin: 0px auto 10px; text-align: center; cursor: hand; width: 600px; height: 346px;" class="feature-top" border="0" /></a><br />One of the joys of surfing the Internet is stumbling across new websites and interesting information through the course of normal web reading. And while you can save interesting pages to your browser’s bookmarks, your bookmark folder can get cluttered really quickly. Sure, you can create sub-folders to try to organize things a bit, but it takes longer to save them and it’s harder to see how your different resources relate to each other. A number of web apps (many with desktop and mobile versions as well) fill the need to keep our bookmarks, notes, and other miscellanea stored at one place in the cloud. Some services, like <a href="http://www.evernote.com">Evernote</a>, are more note-oriented; while others, like the much-loved <a href="http://www.delicious.com/">Delicious</a>, focus on the bookmarks and sharing. <a href="http://www.diigo.com">Diigo</a> offers a convenient middle ground, providing social bookmarking, notes, and image storage in one place.<br /><br /><span style="font-weight: bold;">Features</span><br />At first blush, Diigo’s feature set seems pretty standard: Save bookmarks, notes, and pictures in one place. Tag entries for easy sorting. Because this is Web 2.0, other users can comment on whatever entries you’ve saved publicly. Because this is 2011, you can follow other Diigo users, invite your friends, create groups, and maintain a profile. The Community page shows which pages are most linked by users (lots of education technology links here).<br /><br />What really caught my eye as I was poking around their About page was the Diigo Educator Account. These people have thought about features that teachers and students need, and they’ve provided a way for teachers and classes to share and annotate information. Educators can batch-create student accounts, which automatically creates a Diigo group that includes forums.<br /><br />Student accounts default to high privacy (only teachers and classmates can communicate with them), and only education-related ads get displayed (it’s a free service, after all). You can read the <a href="http://help.diigo.com/teacher-account/faq">FAQ about Diigo Educator Accounts here</a>.<br /><br /><a href="https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/_6Zln-7k5oag/TXa6MFlYnsI/AAAAAAAAAHU/dlLhk6Hidwo/diigo%20view%20all.jpg" onblur="try {parent.deselectBloggerImageGracefully();} catch(e) {}"><img src="https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/_6Zln-7k5oag/TXa6MFlYnsI/AAAAAAAAAHU/dlLhk6Hidwo/diigo%20view%20all.jpg" alt="" style="display: block; margin: 0px auto 10px; text-align: center; cursor: hand; width: 600px; height: 474px;" class="feature-top" border="0" /></a><br /><span style="font-weight: bold;">Sample Classroom &amp; Youth Program Applications</span></p><p> </p><ul><li><span style="font-weight: bold;">All subjects</span>: Have students create topic-based groups of bookmarks for websites that pertain to subjects discussed in class. Pick a different student-selected site twice a week to evaluate together as a class for content, bias, and relevancy. This will increase student information literacy (a skill our youth today <a href="http://www.districtadministration.com/viewarticle.aspx?articleid=2529">sorely need</a>)</li><li><span style="font-weight: bold;">All subjects:</span> When students are working on a project or paper that requires online research, have them bookmark all of their web resources using Diigo. Require students to write a brief abstract for each source using the note feature to help them remember why this source may be useful to them.</li></ul><p> </p><p><span style="font-weight: bold;">Breakdown</span></p><ul><li><span style="font-weight: bold;">Price Structure:</span> Free &amp; Premium</li><li><span style="font-weight: bold;">Pros</span>:<ul><li>Educational upgrade available!</li><li>Can sort all entries by tags</li><li>Group functionality allows for collaboration</li><li>Can install toolbar in web browser for even faster indexing</li></ul></li><li><span style="font-weight: bold;">Cons:</span><ul><li>The note feature’s text editor sometimes pastes html code if you cut and paste from a Word document</li><li>Can’t display pictures in notes</li></ul></li></ul><p><br /><br /></p><p>Do you use Diigo or other cloud-based social bookmarking sites with your youth? Do you have any activity suggestions, tips, or tricks to share? Comment below or contact us!</p><div class="blogger-post-footer"><img src="https://blogger.googleusercontent.com/tracker/902885274664531497-3190653382511298724?l=newlearninginstitute.blogspot.com" alt="" width="1" height="1" /></div></div></div></div><div class="field field-name-field-blog-topics field-type-taxonomy-term-reference field-label-above"><div class="field-label">Topics:&nbsp;</div><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><a href="/blog_topics/technology_integration/index.html" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Technology Integration</a></div><div class="field-item odd"><a href="/blog_topics/social_networking/index.html" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Social Networking</a></div><div class="field-item even"><a href="/blog_topics/tools/index.html" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Tools</a></div><div class="field-item odd"><a href="/blog-topics/web-20" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Web 2.0</a></div><div class="field-item even"><a href="/blog-topics/digital-learning" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Digital Learning</a></div><div class="field-item odd"><a href="/blog_topics/21st_century_skills/index.html" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">21st Century Skills</a></div></div></div>Tue, 08 Mar 2011 23:12:00 +0000Jennifer Dick128 at http://newlearninginstitute.orghttp://newlearninginstitute.org/blog/tool-review-diigo#commentsTool Review: Cacoohttp://newlearninginstitute.org/blog/tool-review-cacoo <div class="field field-name-body field-type-text-with-summary field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even" property="content:encoded"><p><a href="https://lh5.googleusercontent.com/_6Zln-7k5oag/TVxG0Q_ziKI/AAAAAAAAAG0/sgkjnFMtxos/cacoo_home.jpg" onblur="try {parent.deselectBloggerImageGracefully();} catch(e) {}"><img src="https://lh5.googleusercontent.com/_6Zln-7k5oag/TVxG0Q_ziKI/AAAAAAAAAG0/sgkjnFMtxos/cacoo_home.jpg" alt="" style="display: block; margin: 0px auto 10px; text-align: center; cursor: hand; width: 600px; height: 444px;" class="feature-top" border="0" /></a><br />What’s the first thing you do when you’re trying to figure out how to think through a complicated problem with lots of information and steps? I don’t know about you, but I tend to reach for pen and paper to visually organize my thoughts. Drafting a flowchart can be a really helpful way to work out what tasks are dependent upon others, where you need to get your information from, and other factors. Sometimes in the middle of your chart creation, you realize that you forgot an important step – and it’s back to the drawing board. Literally. Unless you used a digital tool like <a href="http://cacoo.com/">Cacoo</a>, that is.<br /><br /><span style="font-weight: bold;">Features</span><br />Cacoo is a web app that makes many kinds of diagram and charting tasks as simple as drag-and-drop. Their menus include basic shapes, call outs, room floorplan items, site maps and wireframe tools for webpage design, and iOS and Android app design elements. The interface is very intuitive and user-friendly. You can change an object’s properties, such as line and fill color, using a simplified inspector window that will make sense to Adobe CS users and neophytes alike. In addition to drawing from the vast library of shape options provided by Cacoo, it’s very simple to add your own images from either your computer or elsewhere online.<br /><br />Because Cacoo is a Web 2.0 application, they’ve also made it very easy to collaborate with others. Sheets can be shared with team members, and if they’re logged in at the same time, you can IM them through the in-browser chat window. You can also share entire folders.<br /><br /><span style="font-weight: bold;">Sample Classroom &amp; Youth Program Applications</span></p><ul><li><span style="font-weight: bold;">All Subjects:</span> At the beginning of a project, have student teams create a chart of what steps they need to go through in order to complete the project. This helps them learn backwards planning and deal with project management in the future!</li><li><span style="font-weight: bold;">Computer Science – Programming</span>: As part of the program design process, have students create flowcharts showing the flow of data and operations required in the finished program. They share their flowcharts with each other (or actual programmers if possible) to get ideas for improving their design prior to coding.</li><li><span style="font-weight: bold;">Computer Science – Networking:</span> Cacoo also has quite a few icons for charting a computer network, so if your students ever have to design their own network for a real or imagined client, they now can quickly create a polished network diagram.</li><li><span style="font-weight: bold;">Digital Media:</span> Cacoo makes storyboarding films and wire-framing websites easy!</li><li><span style="font-weight: bold;">English Language Arts:</span> Students chart out their essay arguments starting with the thesis and adding support and analysis – good for helping visual learners construct a strong argument.</li><li><span style="font-weight: bold;">Math:</span> Have students create a flowchart to model the process of solving a particular type of problem.</li></ul><p><br /><br /></p><p><a href="https://lh5.googleusercontent.com/_6Zln-7k5oag/TVxGSsHy4RI/AAAAAAAAAGo/rE-YjocKnjo/Cacoo.jpg" onblur="try {parent.deselectBloggerImageGracefully();} catch(e) {}"><img src="https://lh5.googleusercontent.com/_6Zln-7k5oag/TVxGSsHy4RI/AAAAAAAAAGo/rE-YjocKnjo/Cacoo.jpg" alt="" style="display: block; margin: 0px auto 10px; text-align: center; cursor: hand; width: 600px; height: 298px;" class="feature-top" border="0" /></a><br /><br /><span style="font-weight: bold;">Breakdown </span></p><p> </p><ul><li><span style="font-weight: bold;">Price Structure:</span> Free &amp; Premium ($4.95/month or $49/year for unlimited sheets, unlimited collaborators, and increased file-type export options)</li><li><span style="font-weight: bold;">Pros:</span><ul><li>Very easy to create clean and polished-looking diagrams</li><li>Can export final diagrams (PNG format only for free accounts)</li><li>Lots of useful templates</li><li>Ability to collaborate with other people on your project</li></ul></li><li><span style="font-weight: bold;">Cons:</span><ul><li>If you choose to buy a premium account using PayPal, it will automatically renew, so mark your calendar. At least they’re upfront about this, though.</li></ul></li></ul><p> </p><p>Do you use Cacoo or another diagram creator with your youth? Do you have any activity suggestions, tips, or tricks to share? Comment below or contact us!</p><div class="blogger-post-footer"><img src="https://blogger.googleusercontent.com/tracker/902885274664531497-4695002762125773815?l=newlearninginstitute.blogspot.com" alt="" width="1" height="1" /></div></div></div></div><div class="field field-name-field-blog-topics field-type-taxonomy-term-reference field-label-above"><div class="field-label">Topics:&nbsp;</div><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><a href="/blog_topics/technology_integration/index.html" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Technology Integration</a></div><div class="field-item odd"><a href="/blog_topics/tools/index.html" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Tools</a></div><div class="field-item even"><a href="/blog-topics/digital-literacy" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Digital Literacy</a></div><div class="field-item odd"><a href="/blog-topics/web-20" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Web 2.0</a></div><div class="field-item even"><a href="/blog_topics/21st_century_skills/index.html" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">21st Century Skills</a></div></div></div>Thu, 17 Feb 2011 17:54:00 +0000Jennifer Dick133 at http://newlearninginstitute.orghttp://newlearninginstitute.org/blog/tool-review-cacoo#commentsNew PBS Series: Digital Media: New Learners of the 21st Centuryhttp://newlearninginstitute.org/blog/new-pbs-series-digital-media-new-learners-21st-century <div class="field field-name-body field-type-text-with-summary field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even" property="content:encoded"><p><a href="https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/_6Zln-7k5oag/TVWOtfU4usI/AAAAAAAAAGQ/jLD_p8hyKTQ/PBS%20pg.jpg" onblur="try {parent.deselectBloggerImageGracefully();} catch(e) {}"><img src="https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/_6Zln-7k5oag/TVWOtfU4usI/AAAAAAAAAGQ/jLD_p8hyKTQ/PBS%20pg.jpg" alt="" style="display: block; margin: 0px auto 10px; text-align: center; cursor: hand; width: 600px; height: 289px;" class="feature-top" border="0" /></a></p><p> </p><div>Our world is changing faster than our education system, and the rise of mobile technology means that now more than ever, learning can take place anywhere at any time. PBS’s new series <a href="http://www.pbs.org/parents/digital-media/">Digital Media: New Learners of the 21st Century</a> explores how thought leaders, practitioners, youth, schools and after school programs are using digital media and tools to engage youth and deepen their involvement with their communities and each other. The series website has extended interviews with the digital media experts, as well as background on some of the featured youth programs.</div><div> </div><div>We’re very excited to have some our work with the Smithsonian highlighted--we're in very good company!</div><div> </div><div><a href="http://www.pbs.org/parents/digital-media/airdates.html">Check here</a> to find out when the series will air on your local PBS station.</div><div style="font-weight: bold;"> </div><div class="blogger-post-footer"><img src="https://blogger.googleusercontent.com/tracker/902885274664531497-9135001842684901079?l=newlearninginstitute.blogspot.com" alt="" width="1" height="1" /></div></div></div></div><div class="field field-name-field-blog-topics field-type-taxonomy-term-reference field-label-above"><div class="field-label">Topics:&nbsp;</div><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><a href="/blog_topics/technology_integration/index.html" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Technology Integration</a></div><div class="field-item odd"><a href="/blog-topics/nliatwork" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">NLIatWork</a></div><div class="field-item even"><a href="/blog_topics/leaders/index.html" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Leaders</a></div><div class="field-item odd"><a href="/blog_topics/communities_practice/index.html" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Communities of Practice</a></div><div class="field-item even"><a href="/blog-topics/work" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">at Work</a></div><div class="field-item odd"><a href="/blog_topics/place_based_learning/index.html" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Place Based Learning</a></div><div class="field-item even"><a href="/blog-topics/technology-education" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Technology Education</a></div><div class="field-item odd"><a href="/blog-topics/museums" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Museums</a></div><div class="field-item even"><a href="/blog_topics/mobile_learning/index.html" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Mobile Learning</a></div><div class="field-item odd"><a href="/blog-topics/digital-learning" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Digital Learning</a></div></div></div>Fri, 11 Feb 2011 19:22:00 +0000Jennifer Dick135 at http://newlearninginstitute.orghttp://newlearninginstitute.org/blog/new-pbs-series-digital-media-new-learners-21st-century#commentsTool Review: Learning Ruby with Hackety Hackhttp://newlearninginstitute.org/blog/tool-review-learning-ruby-hackety-hack <div class="field field-name-body field-type-text-with-summary field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even" property="content:encoded"><p><a href="http://lh4.ggpht.com/_6Zln-7k5oag/TUHN-W8NPMI/AAAAAAAAAF0/4vhg8xl75ZM/Hackety%20Hack.jpeg" onblur="try {parent.deselectBloggerImageGracefully();} catch(e) {}"><img src="http://lh4.ggpht.com/_6Zln-7k5oag/TUHN-W8NPMI/AAAAAAAAAF0/4vhg8xl75ZM/Hackety%20Hack.jpeg" alt="" style="display: block; margin: 0px auto 10px; text-align: center; cursor: hand; width: 600px; height: 415px;" class="feature-top" border="0" /></a><br /><br />The word on the street is that nerds have become cool again, and one thing synonymous with hardcore nerdom is computer programming. Once, programming was seen as the province of only the most dedicated people – those willing to learn a new language and write line upon line of tedious code. Twenty years ago, when those few of us who had PCs were running DOS (the ancient times before Windows or Mac OS!), the <a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/3-2-1_Contact">3-2-1 Contact print magazine</a> included reader-submitted programs written in <a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/BASIC">BASIC</a> that patient subscribers could enter and run on their own computers. Well, programming still requires patience and careful attention to detail if programs are going to run, but there are more resources available than ever for people (including kids) interested in learning the fundamentals of programming. With basic HTML infusing even the most entry-level blogging and commenting experiences, a desire to learn important programming syntax and concepts is slowly working its way into the layperson’s consciousness and becoming less of an anomaly.<br /><br />BASIC still has lessons to offer the new programmer, but it has been displaced by a number of newer languages. One example is <a href="http://www.ruby-lang.org/en/">Ruby</a>, an open-source option developed by Yukihiro Matsumoto, who wanted to create a powerful language that put the human programmer’s needs before the computer’s in a pleasant user interface (2003: <a href="http://www.artima.com/intv/ruby4.html">Artima Developer</a>). I’m not a programmer – just an interested bystander – but from what I can tell when looking up entry-level languages, the two that seemed to come up the most in discussions about starting languages were Ruby and Python. And for which language did the blogosphere keep dropping how-to resources into my lap? Ruby. Of these resources, the one I liked the best was <a href="%20http://hackety-hack.com/">Hackety Hack</a>, a freeware application, including self-paced programming tutorials, for Windows, Mac, and Linux systems.<br /><br /><span style="font-weight: bold;">Features</span><br />Once installed, Hackety Hack’s tour walks the user through its friendly interface. Working in a split screen with instructions on the left and the compiler (a program that runs the specific coding language you’re writing) window on the right, it’s easy to go through the exercises and double-check your work when you inevitably miskey your code. I don't know if it's a Ruby, Shoes, or Hackety Hack feature, but the different parts of Ruby speech (can you tell I used to be an English teacher?) are automatically color-coded in the programming window, which is really helpful for seeing the structure and syntax of the code you're entering. There’s a strong (if a tad disorganized) online community of users available for posting questions and sharing links, and your profile allows you to publish programs you’ve written.<br /><br />The application downloads with only four lessons, which is unfortunate because after completing them, I still felt like I’d barely scratched the surface and wasn’t too confident in my own mastery of the concepts provided; however, this could very well be due to my own lack of facility. When I posted a question asking about more material, I got two responses within 24 hours, one with a link to resources on other sites. These resources were ones I’d already found in my preliminary research on Ruby, but it was nice to know that the forums I’d browsed were on the level.<br /><br /><span style="font-weight: bold;">Breakdown </span></p><p> </p><ul><li>Price Structure: Free</li><li>Pros:<ul><li>Easy, non-intimidating user interface</li><li>Included lessons do an excellent job of walking a newbie through the exercises</li><li>Good sandbox (testing ground) for user-created programs</li><li>Responsive community board</li></ul></li><li>Cons:<ul><li>Ends after four lessons</li></ul></li></ul><p><br /><br /></p><p><span style="font-weight: bold;">Additional Resources for Learning Programming</span></p><p> </p><ul><li><a href="http://pine.fm/LearnToProgram/">Learn to Program</a>. Chris Pine. Highly recommended in a number of forums; commentors say that this is a great guide for someone without any programming experience to learn real fundamentals (online tutorial on the left).</li><li><a href="http://tryruby.org/">Try Ruby!</a>. Andrew McElroy and David Miani. A 15-minute in-browser tutorial to get started with wherever there’s a web connection.</li></ul><p> </p><p>What is your favorite entry-level programming language? Have you done programming projects with your youth? Any great resources to share? Tell us about it in the comments!</p><div class="blogger-post-footer"><img src="https://blogger.googleusercontent.com/tracker/902885274664531497-1823858466740208032?l=newlearninginstitute.blogspot.com" alt="" width="1" height="1" /></div></div></div></div><div class="field field-name-field-blog-topics field-type-taxonomy-term-reference field-label-above"><div class="field-label">Topics:&nbsp;</div><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><a href="/blog_topics/technology_integration/index.html" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Technology Integration</a></div><div class="field-item odd"><a href="/blog_topics/tools/index.html" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Tools</a></div><div class="field-item even"><a href="/blog-topics/digital-literacy" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Digital Literacy</a></div><div class="field-item odd"><a href="/blog-topics/web-20" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Web 2.0</a></div><div class="field-item even"><a href="/blog-topics/technology-education" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Technology Education</a></div><div class="field-item odd"><a href="/blog_topics/21st_century_skills/index.html" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">21st Century Skills</a></div></div></div>Thu, 27 Jan 2011 19:33:00 +0000Jennifer Dick141 at http://newlearninginstitute.orghttp://newlearninginstitute.org/blog/tool-review-learning-ruby-hackety-hack#commentsYouth as Curators: User-Created Content at Museumshttp://newlearninginstitute.org/blog/youth-curators-user-created-content-museums <div class="field field-name-body field-type-text-with-summary field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even" property="content:encoded"><p><a href="http://lh3.ggpht.com/_6Zln-7k5oag/TS9DSaEeofI/AAAAAAAAAFc/tRLfOnPYHIc/Monterey%20MLIPD050.jpg" onblur="try {parent.deselectBloggerImageGracefully();} catch(e) {}"><img src="http://lh3.ggpht.com/_6Zln-7k5oag/TS9DSaEeofI/AAAAAAAAAFc/tRLfOnPYHIc/Monterey%20MLIPD050.jpg" alt="" style="display: block; margin: 0px auto 10px; text-align: center; cursor: hand; width: 600px; height: 450px;" class="feature-top" border="0" /></a><br /><br />The idea of shifting the participation of museum visitors from internal (i.e., mental, or “look but don’t touch”) interaction to external (physical, hands-on) interaction isn’t a new one. Natural history museums have been doing this for years with exhibits that allow visitors to physically engage with selected artifacts. I remember going to <a href="http://www.coyoteptmuseum.org/">Coyote Point Museum</a> in San Mateo, CA as a child in the 1980s and touching a piece of raccoon pelt and taking my friends up on a dare to smell the skunk exhibit. We learned about the different kinds of fault structures by using the manipulables that mimicked dip-slip, thrust, strike-slip, and reverse faults. Being able to use a sense other than sight at the museum is why I remember these activities some 20 years later.<br /><br />But here’s what is new: The recent increase in the portability and ubiquity of digital media creation tools has helped push teaching and learning practice beyond basic internal and external interaction to a focus on actively making meaning. Now many museums and other cultural institutions are providing opportunities for visitors to record their reactions to exhibits and share them with subsequent visitors through audio, video, images, and social media. Bringing participatory culture into museums can help engage youth for whom this sort of interaction is integral to how they process their experiences – not only making these spaces more welcoming to young people, but also providing a platform for documenting the importance of these places to the community.<br /><br /><span style="font-weight: bold;">In Practice</span><br />Our work with <a href="http://www.newlearninginstitute.org/digital-media-programs/museum-programs/chicago-field-museum.html">Chicago’s The Field Museum</a> and the <a href="http://newlearninginstitute.blogspot.com/2010/11/visible-thinking-at-national-postal.html">Smithsonian Institution’s National Postal Museum</a> shows how two major museums are responding to the meaning-making trend by creating structured programs in partnership with local schools and organizations, giving youth a chance to own the issues and artifacts at these two institutions. When youth are provided an active way to engage with content and a platform that honors their voice and media preferences, they become invested in not only the content, but also in the space and in thinking critically about the knowledge they consume.<br /><br />Making meaning – and content – doesn’t only happen on site, or even in the classroom. While many museums have a strong online presence, sometimes including ways for site visitors to respond to content, there are some web spaces that allow people to create their own online exhibits. <a href="http://rhizome.org/">Rhizome</a> at New York’s New Museum of Contemporary Art is an arts organization that explores “emerging artistic practices that engage technology” and actively finds ways for people to participate in projects. Rhizome encourages their base to use their online archive, <a href="http://rhizome.org/art/">ArtBase</a>, to create <a href="http://rhizome.org/art/member-curated/">member-curated exhibits</a>. This gives people a chance to document their own aesthetic insights and inquiries, shifting power from a few art professionals to any interested consumer of art.<br /><br /><span style="font-weight: bold;">What’s Next?</span><br />Those cultural institutions that have been employing visitor-created content for some time are now wrestling with questions of <a href="http://uncatalogedmuseum.blogspot.com/2010/04/how-long-should-participation-last.html">what to do with the resulting physical artifacts</a> and how to store them. While easier to store, digital artifacts also raise questions of file showcasing and hosting – how will the pictures/movies/micro-blogs/etc. be shared? How long will these digital files sit on the museum’s servers before they are cleared away for new files; or will they be kept in perpetuity? And while showing these digital artifacts on a website is great, professional curators will need to continue to find ways to integrate user-created content into the physical exhibits if they wish to make visitor contributions seem meaningful and worth the contributors’ time and effort. It will be interesting to see how cultural institutions tackle these issues and move this practice along.<br /><br />Do you have any experiences with user-created content in museums or other cultural institutions? Please share them in the comments!<br /><br /><span style="font-weight: bold;">Additional Reading on User-Created Museum Content</span></p><p> </p><ul><ul><li><a href="http://spotlight.macfound.org/featured-stories/entry/art-mobs-strolling-moma-student-curators/">Art Mobs: Strolling MoMA with Student Curators on Your iPod.</a> Mac Montandon. Spotlight on Digital Media and Learning: MacArthur Foundation.</li></ul></ul><p> </p><ul><ul><li><a href="http://museumtwo.blogspot.com/2007/10/layer-on-for-long-haul-sustaining.html">Layer on for the Long Haul: Sustaining Visitor Co-created Experiences.</a> Nina Simon. Museum 2.0.</li></ul></ul><p> </p><ul><ul><li><a href="http://www.technologyinthearts.org/?p=1632">Planning for Engagement: Tech Strategy &amp; the Visitor Experience.</a> Thomas Hughes. Technology in the Arts: Exploring the intersection of arts management and online technology.</li></ul></ul><p> </p><ul><li><a href="http://flipthemedia.com/index.php/2010/01/to-curate-or-create-that-is-the-question/">To Curate or Create, That Is the Question.</a> Kathy Gill. MCDM: Flip the Media: A blog about the digital media revolution: University of Washington.</li></ul><div class="blogger-post-footer"><img src="https://blogger.googleusercontent.com/tracker/902885274664531497-9214435682763174391?l=newlearninginstitute.blogspot.com" alt="" width="1" height="1" /></div></div></div></div><div class="field field-name-field-blog-topics field-type-taxonomy-term-reference field-label-above"><div class="field-label">Topics:&nbsp;</div><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><a href="/blog_topics/technology_integration/index.html" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Technology Integration</a></div><div class="field-item odd"><a href="/blog_topics/social_networking/index.html" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Social Networking</a></div><div class="field-item even"><a href="/blog_topics/place_based_learning/index.html" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Place Based Learning</a></div><div class="field-item odd"><a href="/blog-topics/web-20" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Web 2.0</a></div><div class="field-item even"><a href="/blog_topics/project_based_learning/index.html" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Project Based Learning</a></div><div class="field-item odd"><a href="/blog-topics/community" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Community</a></div><div class="field-item even"><a href="/blog-topics/digital-learning" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Digital Learning</a></div></div></div>Thu, 13 Jan 2011 18:25:00 +0000Jennifer Dick142 at http://newlearninginstitute.orghttp://newlearninginstitute.org/blog/youth-curators-user-created-content-museums#commentsTool Review: Animotohttp://newlearninginstitute.org/blog/tool-review-animoto <div class="field field-name-body field-type-text-with-summary field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even" property="content:encoded"><p><a href="http://lh5.ggpht.com/_6Zln-7k5oag/TSI08Y6h8OI/AAAAAAAAAFE/Xsc9fRiq4Aw/animoto.jpg" onblur="try {parent.deselectBloggerImageGracefully();} catch(e) {}"><img src="http://lh5.ggpht.com/_6Zln-7k5oag/TSI08Y6h8OI/AAAAAAAAAFE/Xsc9fRiq4Aw/animoto.jpg" alt="" style="display: block; margin: 0px auto 10px; text-align: center; cursor: hand; width: 600px; height: 370px;" class="feature-top" border="0" /></a><br /><br />With the increasing availability of digital cameras through price reduction and integration into other gadgets, it’s easier than ever to get your hands on something that takes pictures. Most youth these days have some kind of online photo album, whether it’s with Flickr, Facebook, Photobucket, or another site. One way for students to showcase the photographic documentation of their work is through a photoblog. In an earlier post, we reviewed <a href="http://newlearninginstitute.blogspot.com/2010/12/tool-review-scrapblog.html">Scrapblog</a>, which, while providing a lot of options for customizing layout, content, and design, isn’t terribly dynamic when played back as a slideshow. It also offers the potential for a lot of fussing to get things “just so.” Sometimes you just want a quick and dirty slideshow creator that offers some pizzazz for a short promotional piece or rapid assembly for a study aid. That’s when you want <a href="http://animoto.com/">Animoto</a>.<br /><br /><span style="font-weight: bold;">Features</span><br />The free (basic) version of Animoto’s web application allows you to create a themed 30-second slideshow with music and titles. That’s it. When I first started playing around with the app, I found it very simple and very limited, especially if you’re used to having the kind of control that a video editing program delivers, such as choosing how long a particular image is displayed, the length of a transition, etc. But this weakness can also be a strength; instead of having to allot a few weeks of time for a carefully crafted video piece, you can have a polished-looking clip done in less than an hour – in fact, I was able to upload and assemble my media, add titles and music, and render and publish the sample below in less than 15 minutes. Speaking of media, you can upload from your computer or link your Animoto account with the usual media hosting services. Animoto also has a stock photo and video library that you can access for additional media assets. Rearrange your pictures, add titles, add some music (they have a decent-sized library to choose from, or you can upload your own), and you’re done. Finished movies are provided with an Animoto-hosted embed code, or you can export to YouTube.<br /><br /><object id="vp1WUZcb" data="http://static.animoto.com/swf/w.swf?w=swf/vp1&amp;e=1293752889&amp;f=WUZcb2lWfCzJjtQWHlIPJg&amp;d=31&amp;m=b&amp;r=w&amp;i=m&amp;options=" type="application/x-shockwave-flash" width="600" height="333"><param name="allowFullScreen" value="true" /><param name="allowscriptaccess" value="always" /><param name="src" value="http://static.animoto.com/swf/w.swf?w=swf/vp1&amp;e=1293752889&amp;f=WUZcb2lWfCzJjtQWHlIPJg&amp;d=31&amp;m=b&amp;r=w&amp;i=m&amp;options=" /><param name="allowfullscreen" value="true" /></object><br /><br /><span style="font-weight: bold;">Sample Classroom &amp; Youth Program Applications</span></p><p> </p><ul><li><span style="font-weight: bold;">Science:</span> In small groups, students are assigned a review topic and create a brief presentation with pictures and key facts to act as a study aid for an exam.</li><li><span style="font-weight: bold;">English Language Arts:</span> Students create an advertisement for their independent reading book.</li><li><span style="font-weight: bold;">History:</span> Students use primary source documents to inform and illustrate a brief advertisement appropriate to the time period of study. For example, they could develop an abolitionist public service announcement, create a promotional piece for the transcontinental railroad, or develop a propaganda piece that illustrates Japan’s reasons for fighting in WWII.</li><li><span style="font-weight: bold;">Health:</span> Students research a health issue in their community and create a brief public service announcement with facts, prevention tips, and community resources for treatment.</li><li><span style="font-style: italic;">College and Career Planning: </span>Students research a career field that interests them and create a brief slideshow sharing educational/training requirements, salary, prospects for growth, etc. Pool all student videos together to serve as a resource for your next cohort of students. Can also have students research colleges and universities instead.</li></ul><p><br /><br /></p><p><span style="font-weight: bold;">Breakdown </span></p><p> </p><ul><li><span style="font-weight: bold;">Price Structure:</span> Free and Premium</li><li><span style="font-weight: bold;">Pros:</span><ul><li>Very simple interface</li><li>Includes free stock photos, footage, and music tracks</li><li>Slideshows can be constructed very quickly</li></ul></li><li><span style="font-weight: bold;">Cons:</span><ul><li>Slideshows limited to 30 seconds/12 images with the free account</li><li>Lots of prompts throughout production process to upgrade to a premium account</li><li>Need paid account to adjust timing of individual slides</li></ul></li></ul><p> </p><p>Do you use Animoto with your youth? Do you have any activity suggestions, tips, or tricks to share? Comment below or contact us!</p><div class="blogger-post-footer"><img src="https://blogger.googleusercontent.com/tracker/902885274664531497-9082803259047551302?l=newlearninginstitute.blogspot.com" alt="" width="1" height="1" /></div></div></div></div><div class="field field-name-field-blog-topics field-type-taxonomy-term-reference field-label-above"><div class="field-label">Topics:&nbsp;</div><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><a href="/blog_topics/technology_integration/index.html" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Technology Integration</a></div><div class="field-item odd"><a href="/blog_topics/tools/index.html" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Tools</a></div><div class="field-item even"><a href="/blog_topics/nli_play/index.html" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">NLI at Play</a></div><div class="field-item odd"><a href="/blog-topics/digital-literacy" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Digital Literacy</a></div><div class="field-item even"><a href="/blog-topics/web-20" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Web 2.0</a></div><div class="field-item odd"><a href="/blog-topics/technology-education" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Technology Education</a></div><div class="field-item even"><a href="/blog-topics/digital-learning" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Digital Learning</a></div><div class="field-item odd"><a href="/blog_topics/21st_century_skills/index.html" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">21st Century Skills</a></div></div></div>Mon, 03 Jan 2011 20:44:00 +0000Jennifer Dick144 at http://newlearninginstitute.orghttp://newlearninginstitute.org/blog/tool-review-animoto#commentsStudent Voice on Educational Social Networkshttp://newlearninginstitute.org/blog/student-voice-educational-social-networks <div class="field field-name-body field-type-text-with-summary field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even" property="content:encoded"><p><a href="http://lh3.ggpht.com/_vCZNu4VuMQ8/TIE7ZNtFU2I/AAAAAAAACdI/PokbrkzNEXU/4902720708_44bc64cdcc_o.jpg" onblur="try {parent.deselectBloggerImageGracefully();} catch(e) {}"><img src="http://lh3.ggpht.com/_vCZNu4VuMQ8/TIE7ZNtFU2I/AAAAAAAACdI/PokbrkzNEXU/4902720708_44bc64cdcc_o.jpg" style="width: 600px; height: 409px;" class="feature-top" /></a><br />Last week, we took a brief look at how SFUSD used an <a href="http://sfusd-cte.mli-network.org/">educational social network</a> to introduce the concept of a professional online presence as part of its summer internship program. While this is something that educators and business people care about, it can seem rather abstract and distant to some teenagers. What did capture teens’ interest, however, was being able to share their workplace experiences with each other. All of this behavior is second nature to the youth of today, so why not meet them where they are: online? In past years, internship seminar teachers in San Francisco might have asked their students to keep a journal, but this wasn’t a standard practice. If they could, students would sometimes discuss among themselves what was happening at the work site, troubleshooting new interpersonal situations that they didn’t have experience in dealing with. But every year, these youth experiences benefited only those who had been directly involved with them. It’s an accepted fact that <a href="http://www.ericdigests.org/1994/peer.htm">we learn best from our peers</a>, so the SFUSD decided, “Why not give students a 24-hour online platform in which they can learn from each other?”<br /><br />Unsurprisingly, the interns needed almost no orientation to the site’s user interface or various tools, such as photo albums or bookmarks. Once they had their user names and passwords, they were customizing their profiles, uploading pictures, friending their classmates, and leaving messages for each other on their walls. Joining their seminar teacher’s group to get class updates, download materials, and engage in online discussions made sense to them. They responded to <a href="http://sfusd-cte.mli-network.org/pg/pages/view/1122/">a set of weekly blog prompts</a> that helped them apply the topics being discussed in their seminar class to their own workplace experiences. Students also <a href="http://sfusd-cte.mli-network.org/pg/photos/owned/ThuyO1">uploaded pictures</a> of themselves at their workstations, of their supervisors, and of the other important parts of their internship.<br /><br />Here are some activity ideas for providing students with opportunities to share and honor their experiences:</p><p> </p><ul><li><span style="font-weight: bold;">Blogging | </span>Incorporate opportunities for students to reflect on their experiences and what they’ve learned. Not only is this an excellent venue for introducing literacy activities that students find more palatable, it’s also a great way for shyer students to have their voices heard.<ul><li>Some common <a href="http://findarticles.com/p/articles/mi_m0NQM/is_4_41/ai_94872708/">metacognitive</a>prompt stems include:<ul><li>What was the most interesting or important thing you learned?</li><li>What do you want to know more about?</li><li>What was the most successful part of… ?</li><li>What was the most challenging aspect of… ?</li><li>What are you the most proud of? Why?</li><li>What would you do differently next time? How?</li></ul></li></ul></li></ul><div> </div><ul><li><span style="font-weight: bold;">Photo Essays |</span>Most social network platforms make it very easy to incorporate digital photographs. With very many students having cell phones these days, this means nearly all students have access to a digital camera. Photo essays give students a venue to show us the world through their eyes. This is a less-intimidating option for English language learners and for those students who have difficulty verbalizing their thoughts.<ul><li>See how teacher Kimberly Johnson at Wisconsin’s Sheboygan Falls High School is engaging her senior English class in a <a href="http://www.sheboyganfalls.k12.wi.us/kajohnson/2010/09/27/lab-photo-essays/">photo essay assignment</a> as a means of documenting student inquiry into the question of “what is art?”.</li></ul></li></ul><ul><li><span style="font-weight: bold;">“On the Street” Reporting |</span>If you or your students have access to a camera that records video, students can also report from the field and upload their videos to the social network. It’s a very powerful experience for students to see themselves online, and especially to know that others are watching.<ul><li><a href="http://www.earthecho.org/">EarthEcho International</a> just launched the <a href="http://www.earthecho.org/programs-stream.html">STREAM</a> (Students Reporting Environmental Action through Media) initiative to train youth in citizen journalism in the U.S. Gulf region to document the impact of the BP oil spill. <a href="http://www.treehugger.com/files/2010/09/thousands-students-trained-citizen-journalists-gulf.php">Hear</a> what co-founder Phillipe Cousteau has to say about this program. Remember: It’s very important that students comment on each other’s work, and that you comment as well! They will be enthusiastic about this platform only if they know they have an audience. Monitor comments to ensure that they are appropriate and that students aren’t just responding to their friends. Fostering an online community can spill over into the classroom or educational program.</li></ul></li></ul><p><span style="font-weight: bold;">Additional Reading on Using Social Networks to Support Student Voice</span></p><ul><li><a href="http://www.onlineuniversities.com/blog/2010/05/100-inspiring-ways-to-use-social-media-in-the-classroom/">100 Inspiring Ways to Use Social Media in the Classroom</a> OnlineUniversities.com.</li><li><a href="http://www.edweek.org/dd/articles/2010/06/16/03networking.h03.html">Social Networking Goes to School</a> Michelle Davis. Digital Directions: Education Week.</li><li><a href="http://www.education.vic.gov.au/management/elearningsupportservices/www/empower/studentvoice.htm">Student Voice: A historical perspective and a new direction</a> John Mainfield, Robyn Collins, John Moore, Sandra Mahar, and Christine Warne. Department of Education and Early Childhood Development, Victoria, Australia.</li></ul><div class="blogger-post-footer"><img src="https://blogger.googleusercontent.com/tracker/902885274664531497-856184081935081897?l=newlearninginstitute.blogspot.com" alt="" width="1" height="1" /></div></div></div></div><div class="field field-name-field-blog-topics field-type-taxonomy-term-reference field-label-above"><div class="field-label">Topics:&nbsp;</div><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><a href="/blog_topics/technology_integration/index.html" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Technology Integration</a></div><div class="field-item odd"><a href="/blog_topics/social_networking/index.html" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Social Networking</a></div><div class="field-item even"><a href="/blog_topics/work_based_learning/index.html" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Work-based Learning</a></div><div class="field-item odd"><a href="/blog-topics/best-practices" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Best Practices</a></div><div class="field-item even"><a href="/blog-topics/web-20" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Web 2.0</a></div><div class="field-item odd"><a href="/blog-topics/community" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Community</a></div><div class="field-item even"><a href="/blog_topics/mobile_learning/index.html" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Mobile Learning</a></div><div class="field-item odd"><a href="/blog_topics/21st_century_skills/index.html" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">21st Century Skills</a></div></div></div>Tue, 16 Nov 2010 22:44:00 +0000Jennifer Dick155 at http://newlearninginstitute.orghttp://newlearninginstitute.org/blog/student-voice-educational-social-networks#comments