New Learning Institute - Museumshttp://www.newlearninginstitute.org/blog-topics/museums enDigital Dispatch: The Youth Design Program at the Field Museumhttp://www.newlearninginstitute.org/blog/digital-dispatch-youth-design-program-field-museum <div class="field field-name-body field-type-text-with-summary field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even" property="content:encoded"><p><img src="http://farm9.staticflickr.com/8225/8436248958_b86cb33e7d_o.png" alt="" /></p><p><em>Teens in Chicago have been busy at work designing a pop-up museum that brings a youth-created exhibit to the community. They've picked their theme and are now working on designing the details of the experience.</em></p><p><strong>Sophie</strong>, an 11th grader from the Youth Design Team shares an update below:</p><p>Here at The Field Museum the Youth Design Team has been hard at work! After weeks of thorough deliberation, all ten of us high schoolers have come to agree on a topic which we will produce a pop-up exhibit on! The marriage of all of our ideas led to a decision to focus on the sometime harmonious, sometime contentious but often overlooked relationship between humans and the natural world. Titled HumaNature, our pop-up exhibition is about the ways in which Nature changes us…and we change nature. With vital deadlines approaching every week, we have little time to fool around! Among the ten of us, we equally distributed the dense impending workload by taking on a job. </p><p>The Content team has made an immense amount of progress. They’ve recently finished sifting through information and condensing facts into comprehensible text panels. They also helped to generate display ideas for graphics. Currently the Content team is helping out the Social Outreach team by generating facts to give the public a sneak peek of things to come. Like our Facebook page facebook.com/TakeTheField to get the insider scoop! And, stay tuned: the Social Outreach team is creating a website that will feature the videos and interactives that accompany HumaNature. </p><p>The Design team has chosen a color palette as well as developed a logo. They are currently learning how to use Adobe Illustrator to produce the exhibit panels and the logo. In the future they will be helping the Video Producer with the graphic look and feel for the films as well as produce posters with QR codes for Production. </p><p>The Interactives team is crafting early prototypes for games visitors to our pop-up exhibition can play. Among the early ideas: a flipbook and a game for an iPad…and something with zombies!</p><p>Video Production is working to produce films visitors can download at the exhibit or view on the website. They have three videos in production on various ways humans and the natural world are intricately involved.</p><p>Our Production team has generated blueprints for the exhibit as well as setup and shutdown plans. These are constantly evolving as more additions are made to the exhibit. The team is working closely with the Interactives team to plan the assembly of analog and digital experiences!</p><p>As deadlines draw near and the things get increasingly hectic, the Youth Design Team is efficiently progressing toward the completion of HumaNature. Stay tuned for weekly updates on what’s going on with us!</p><p> </p></div></div></div><div class="field field-name-field-blog-topics field-type-taxonomy-term-reference field-label-above"><div class="field-label">Topics:&nbsp;</div><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><a href="/blog_topics/design_studio/index.html" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Design Studio</a></div><div class="field-item odd"><a href="/blog-topics/museums" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Museums</a></div><div class="field-item even"><a href="/blog-topics/community" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Community</a></div></div></div>Fri, 01 Feb 2013 18:48:34 +0000Nancy Chou182 at http://www.newlearninginstitute.orghttp://www.newlearninginstitute.org/blog/digital-dispatch-youth-design-program-field-museum#commentsDigital Dispatch: Web Design at the Hirshhornhttp://www.newlearninginstitute.org/blog/digital-dispatch-web-design-hirshhorn <div class="field field-name-body field-type-text-with-summary field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even" property="content:encoded"><p><a href="http://www.flickr.com/photos/51820118@N03/5498173468/" title="IMG_0607 by MLI-SI, on Flickr"><img src="http://farm6.static.flickr.com/5131/5498173468_8dbf4fc747.jpg" alt="IMG_0607" width="500" height="333" /></a></p><div><em>Teen designers work together to build a larger than life website main page</em></div><div><br /><div>Can an artwork inspire a website? <a href="http://artlabplus.si.edu/">ARTLAB+</a> teen designers are developing websites inspired by the <a href="http://hirshhorn.si.edu/">Hirshhorn Museum</a> art collections. After exploring the collections, teens identified a concept they could expand into a personal website expressing these ideas. Here's what teen designer Diamond had to say about her website idea: "Because I love black and white photos, I was really attracted to some of the pieces without color in the Hirshhorn. I'm thinking the theme of my website will be black and white. In some ways black and white images can be more powerful than color ones, especially when it comes to portrait photography of people, or some mediums such as watercolor, ink, and polaroid photography."</div><br /><div>Last week, the teens set the stage for their websites by building wireframe prototypes. To get started, the teens spent some time experimenting with this on a large scale. Teens were challenged to to build the main page of a website on the "computer screen": a large taped off square on the floor. Teen designers worked together to determine what components a music website for teens would have. Aside from the typical web elements - banner and navigation sidebars - the teens came up with some features to catch their audience's attention, including an artist of the day and lyrics of the day feature. These features were written on large pieces of paper and arranged on the "computer screen."</div><br /><div><a href="http://www.flickr.com/photos/51820118@N03/5498172322/" title="IMG_0600 by MLI-SI, on Flickr"><img src="http://farm6.static.flickr.com/5300/5498172322_265d713477.jpg" alt="IMG_0600" width="333" height="500" /></a></div><div>Teen designers used this large-scale exercise as the jumping off point to start building wireframes for their own websites. Here is Nazirah's <a href="http://cacoo.com/">Cacoo</a> wireframe for her photography website.</div><div><br /><a href="http://www.flickr.com/photos/51820118@N03/5498185868/" title="IMG_0644 by MLI-SI, on Flickr"><img src="http://farm6.static.flickr.com/5211/5498185868_de2e1f335a.jpg" alt="IMG_0644" width="500" height="333" /></a></div><div>Stay tuned for the teen designer's final work. In the meantime, check out the <a href="http://www.flickr.com/photos/51820118@N03/sets/72157626176893182/with/5498173468/">ARTLAB+ Web photo set</a>.</div><div> </div></div><div class="blogger-post-footer"><img src="https://blogger.googleusercontent.com/tracker/902885274664531497-4020430890742677612?l=newlearninginstitute.blogspot.com" alt="" width="1" height="1" /></div></div></div></div><div class="field field-name-field-blog-topics field-type-taxonomy-term-reference field-label-above"><div class="field-label">Topics:&nbsp;</div><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><a href="/blog-topics/nliatwork" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">NLIatWork</a></div><div class="field-item odd"><a href="/blog_topics/design_studio/index.html" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Design Studio</a></div><div class="field-item even"><a href="/blog-topics/museums" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Museums</a></div><div class="field-item odd"><a href="/blog-topics/digital-learning" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Digital Learning</a></div></div></div>Thu, 10 Mar 2011 18:34:00 +0000Tiffany McGettigan127 at http://www.newlearninginstitute.orghttp://www.newlearninginstitute.org/blog/digital-dispatch-web-design-hirshhorn#commentsDigital Dispatch: ARTLAB+ Video Program at the Hirshhorn Museumhttp://www.newlearninginstitute.org/blog/digital-dispatch-artlab-video-program-hirshhorn-museum <div class="field field-name-body field-type-text-with-summary field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even" property="content:encoded"><p><a href="http://www.flickr.com/photos/51820118@N03/5448503289/" title="artlab+videocollage1 by MLI-SI, on Flickr"><img src="http://farm6.static.flickr.com/5291/5448503289_2ced799960.jpg" alt="artlab+videocollage1" width="500" height="333" /></a></p><div> </div><p>The Smithsonian Institution <a href="http://hirshhorn.si.edu/">Hirshhorn Museum</a> kicked off their teen <a href="http://newlearninginstitute.blogspot.com/2010/11/design-studio-approach-mobile-learning.html">design studio programming</a> with the ARTLAB+ Video: City of Ruins workshop on January 24th. Ten teens are dedicated to being part of this teen design team. Their design challenge: to create a video series exhibition inspired by ruins in Washington, DC.</p><div><br /><div>Teens spent the first two weeks exploring the foundations of photography and videography through specific composition challenges.</div><br />Brianna took these two photos to illustrate how changing the camera angle can impact the way the subject is captured.</div><div> </div><p><a href="http://www.flickr.com/photos/51820118@N03/5448716859/" title="AnglesbyBrianna by MLI-SI, on Flickr"><img src="http://farm6.static.flickr.com/5299/5448716859_122e22c7dc.jpg" alt="AnglesbyBrianna" width="500" height="250" /></a></p><p> </p><div> </div><div>John took a first stab at camera moves, as shown in this short video. Don't miss his footage of Ardhy demonstrating "the truck."</div><div> </div><p><iframe src="http://player.vimeo.com/video/19987210" width="400" frameborder="0" height="300"></iframe></p><div>Stay tuned for more digital dispatches as the teen designers form production teams, plan video concepts, shoot and edit their work, then work together to create a museum exhibit displaying their video series.</div><div> </div><div><em>To see more images of teens at work check out the ARTLAB+ Video </em><a href="http://www.flickr.com/photos/51820118@N03/sets/72157625912112836/"><em>Flickr photo set</em></a><em>. </em></div><div><em>Learn more about other ARTLAB+ programming by following <a href="http://artlabplus.si.edu/">the ARTLAB+ blog</a>.</em></div><div class="blogger-post-footer"><img src="https://blogger.googleusercontent.com/tracker/902885274664531497-5675590304746765539?l=newlearninginstitute.blogspot.com" alt="" width="1" height="1" /></div></div></div></div><div class="field field-name-field-blog-topics field-type-taxonomy-term-reference field-label-above"><div class="field-label">Topics:&nbsp;</div><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><a href="/blog-topics/nliatwork" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">NLIatWork</a></div><div class="field-item odd"><a href="/blog_topics/design_studio/index.html" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Design Studio</a></div><div class="field-item even"><a href="/blog-topics/project-based-learning" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Project Based Learning</a></div><div class="field-item odd"><a href="/blog-topics/technology-education" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Technology Education</a></div><div class="field-item even"><a href="/blog-topics/museums" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Museums</a></div><div class="field-item odd"><a href="/blog-topics/digital-learning" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Digital Learning</a></div></div></div>Wed, 16 Feb 2011 22:02:00 +0000Tiffany McGettigan134 at http://www.newlearninginstitute.orghttp://www.newlearninginstitute.org/blog/digital-dispatch-artlab-video-program-hirshhorn-museum#commentsNew PBS Series: Digital Media: New Learners of the 21st Centuryhttp://www.newlearninginstitute.org/blog/new-pbs-series-digital-media-new-learners-21st-century <div class="field field-name-body field-type-text-with-summary field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even" property="content:encoded"><p><a href="https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/_6Zln-7k5oag/TVWOtfU4usI/AAAAAAAAAGQ/jLD_p8hyKTQ/PBS%20pg.jpg" onblur="try {parent.deselectBloggerImageGracefully();} catch(e) {}"><img src="https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/_6Zln-7k5oag/TVWOtfU4usI/AAAAAAAAAGQ/jLD_p8hyKTQ/PBS%20pg.jpg" alt="" style="display: block; margin: 0px auto 10px; text-align: center; cursor: hand; width: 600px; height: 289px;" class="feature-top" border="0" /></a></p><p> </p><div>Our world is changing faster than our education system, and the rise of mobile technology means that now more than ever, learning can take place anywhere at any time. PBS’s new series <a href="http://www.pbs.org/parents/digital-media/">Digital Media: New Learners of the 21st Century</a> explores how thought leaders, practitioners, youth, schools and after school programs are using digital media and tools to engage youth and deepen their involvement with their communities and each other. The series website has extended interviews with the digital media experts, as well as background on some of the featured youth programs.</div><div> </div><div>We’re very excited to have some our work with the Smithsonian highlighted--we're in very good company!</div><div> </div><div><a href="http://www.pbs.org/parents/digital-media/airdates.html">Check here</a> to find out when the series will air on your local PBS station.</div><div style="font-weight: bold;"> </div><div class="blogger-post-footer"><img src="https://blogger.googleusercontent.com/tracker/902885274664531497-9135001842684901079?l=newlearninginstitute.blogspot.com" alt="" width="1" height="1" /></div></div></div></div><div class="field field-name-field-blog-topics field-type-taxonomy-term-reference field-label-above"><div class="field-label">Topics:&nbsp;</div><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><a href="/blog_topics/technology_integration/index.html" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Technology Integration</a></div><div class="field-item odd"><a href="/blog-topics/nliatwork" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">NLIatWork</a></div><div class="field-item even"><a href="/blog_topics/leaders/index.html" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Leaders</a></div><div class="field-item odd"><a href="/blog_topics/communities_practice/index.html" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Communities of Practice</a></div><div class="field-item even"><a href="/blog-topics/work" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">at Work</a></div><div class="field-item odd"><a href="/blog_topics/place_based_learning/index.html" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Place Based Learning</a></div><div class="field-item even"><a href="/blog-topics/technology-education" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Technology Education</a></div><div class="field-item odd"><a href="/blog-topics/museums" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Museums</a></div><div class="field-item even"><a href="/blog_topics/mobile_learning/index.html" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Mobile Learning</a></div><div class="field-item odd"><a href="/blog-topics/digital-learning" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Digital Learning</a></div></div></div>Fri, 11 Feb 2011 19:22:00 +0000Jennifer Dick135 at http://www.newlearninginstitute.orghttp://www.newlearninginstitute.org/blog/new-pbs-series-digital-media-new-learners-21st-century#commentsDigital Dispatch: The National Postal Museum Teacher Leaders Programhttp://www.newlearninginstitute.org/blog/digital-dispatch-national-postal-museum-teacher-leaders-program <div class="field field-name-body field-type-text-with-summary field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even" property="content:encoded"><p><a href="http://www.flickr.com/photos/51820118@N03/5405999555/" title="Brainstorming by MLI-SI, on Flickr"><img src="http://farm6.static.flickr.com/5093/5405999555_aac94749e6_o.jpg" alt="Brainstorming" class="feature top" width="600" height="450" /></a></p><p style="margin: 0.0px 0.0px 0.0px 0.0px; font: 12.0px Helvetica;"><em>What does it mean to be a learner in the 21st century? How can teachers reach their students in new and meaningful ways?</em></p><p style="margin: 0.0px 0.0px 0.0px 0.0px; font: 12.0px Helvetica; min-height: 14.0px;">In the popular imagination, the perception of the American classroom is tinged with Normal Rockwell-style images: the image of a classroom with neatly lined rows of desks facing the teacher; the rosy-cheeked student sitting up perfectly straight and attentive to every word the teacher speaks.</p><p style="margin: 0.0px 0.0px 0.0px 0.0px; font: 12.0px Helvetica; min-height: 14.0px;">Whether or not these images are truthful representations of America's educational past, one thing is certain: to be a Teacher Leader in the future will rely very little on being the expert in front of the classroom. Rather, being a Teacher Leader will require a shift in philosophy and approach <span style="font: 12.0px Calibri;">– </span>an ability to ask students to problem solve, teach each other, and become the experts.</p><p style="margin: 0.0px 0.0px 0.0px 0.0px; font: 12.0px Helvetica; min-height: 14.0px;">The Teacher Leaders Program kicked off at the <a href="http://postalmuseum.si.edu/">National Postal Museum</a> during the fall of 2010 with two teaching cohorts: one group of elementary teachers and a second group composed of high school teachers. Each teacher has been challenged to create a learning unit plan that incorporates both the Postal Museum content and new media tools. Their challenge is to connect these components in a meaningful and authentic way <span style="font: 12.0px Calibri;">– </span>providing their students with new resources and tools for learning.</p><p style="margin: 0.0px 0.0px 0.0px 0.0px; font: 12.0px Helvetica; min-height: 14.0px;">Teachers began the program by considering the four primary skills identified in the <a href="http://www.p21.org/">21st Century Skills Initiative</a>: communication, collaboration, creativity, and critical thinking. Reading this list of skills, I always chuckle a little. Certainly, good teachers have taught these things since the beginning of time. The distinction is that <em>how</em> people communicate, collaborate, create, and think critically is rapidly changing in the 21st century. New media gives students the ability to connect and share with the world in real time. A video posts to YouTube, a photo uploads to a Flickr group, a post is written to a personal blog <span style="font: 12.0px Calibri;">– </span>immediately these creations are widely shared and put out for the world's response. Thus, the heart of being a Teacher Leader is to take advantage of the learning opportunities available in a world that already gives their students opportunities to be experts and teach others.</p><p style="margin: 0.0px 0.0px 0.0px 0.0px; font: 12.0px Helvetica; min-height: 14.0px;">In upcoming workshops at the Postal Museum, teachers will begin planning and building out learning unit plan concepts. Stay tuned for future posts which will follow some of these Teacher Leaders as they create a learning plan and engage their students in meaningful activities, ultimately encouraging young people to become creators and teachers themselves.</p><div class="blogger-post-footer"><img src="https://blogger.googleusercontent.com/tracker/902885274664531497-8589451445395865253?l=newlearninginstitute.blogspot.com" alt="" width="1" height="1" /></div></div></div></div><div class="field field-name-field-blog-topics field-type-taxonomy-term-reference field-label-above"><div class="field-label">Topics:&nbsp;</div><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><a href="/blog-topics/nliatwork" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">NLIatWork</a></div><div class="field-item odd"><a href="/blog_topics/communities_practice/index.html" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Communities of Practice</a></div><div class="field-item even"><a href="/blog-topics/technology-education" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Technology Education</a></div><div class="field-item odd"><a href="/blog-topics/museums" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Museums</a></div><div class="field-item even"><a href="/blog-topics/21st-century-skills" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">21st Century Skills</a></div></div></div>Wed, 02 Feb 2011 13:30:00 +0000Tiffany McGettigan138 at http://www.newlearninginstitute.orghttp://www.newlearninginstitute.org/blog/digital-dispatch-national-postal-museum-teacher-leaders-program#commentsCommunities of Practice at the National Postal Museumhttp://www.newlearninginstitute.org/blog/communities-practice-national-postal-museum <div class="field field-name-body field-type-text-with-summary field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even" property="content:encoded"><p><a href="http://1.bp.blogspot.com/_AJz3zglnLrs/TQlB5-riDsI/AAAAAAAABbg/3fcmh8jLAYM/s1600/NPM%2BTeacher%2BLeaders.JPG" onblur="try {parent.deselectBloggerImageGracefully();} catch(e) {}"><img src="http://1.bp.blogspot.com/_AJz3zglnLrs/TQlB5-riDsI/AAAAAAAABbg/3fcmh8jLAYM/s1600/NPM%2BTeacher%2BLeaders.JPG" alt="" style="display: block; margin: 0px auto 10px; text-align: center; cursor: pointer;" class="feature-top" id="BLOGGER_PHOTO_ID_5551040480044781250" border="0" /></a>What type of professional development programming would give educators the opportunity to visit a content-rich museum, become part of an authentic community of like-minded professionals, and design curriculum that engages their students in real-world learning outside the classroom?<br /><br /><strong>Communities of Practice</strong></p><p> </p><blockquote>“Communities of practice are groups of people who share a concern or a passion for something they do and learn how to do it better as they interact regularly.”<br />—Social learning theorist Etienne Wenger</blockquote><p>As Wenger defines it, communities of practice must contain three characteristics:</p><ol><li>A domain – Members of a community of practice identify with and feel committed to a shared domain of interest.</li><li>The Community – The community is a network of individuals who work toward the same domain of interest, engaging in discussions, sharing knowledge, and developing meaningful relationships.</li><li>The Practice – The community’s practice is their sustained interaction, through which they develop a shared collection of resources.</li></ol><p><strong>MLI at the NPM Teacher Leaders Program</strong><br /><br />The MLI at the NPM (<a href="http://www.postalmuseum.si.edu/">National Postal Museum</a>) Teacher Leaders program seeks to provide participants with the opportunity to become part of a community of other educators who understand the integral role that new media plays in enhancing the learning experience. Communities of practice are central to the program components in the following ways:</p><p> </p><ol><li>Domain – New media for learning at the museum.</li><li>The Community – Teacher teams from various middle and high schools convene at the National Postal Museum to engage in activities and discussions around how to merge the exhibits and collections with innovative new-media practices that enrich the learning experience for their students. They publish, share, and collaborate via a social learning network.</li><li>The Practice – An integral aspect of the MLI at the NPM Teacher Leaders program is the process by which these communities of practice grow over time. As the program progresses, the cohorts of curriculum designers and teacher advisors grow, thereby expanding the collective network.</li></ol><p>In the next entry, we’ll take a look at one of the NPM Teacher Leaders programs, weDesign Learning, from the perspective of a practitioner who helped design and execute the program.<br /><br /><strong>Additional Resources on Communities of Practice</strong></p><ul><li>Wenger, E. (2006). <a href="http://ewenger.com/theory/communities_of_practice_intro.htm">Communities of Practice: A Brief Introduction</a></li><li>Wenger, E., McDermott, R. and Snyder, W. (2002). <a href="http://hbswk.hbs.edu/archive/2855.html">Cultivating Communities of Practice: A Guide to Managing Knowledge – Seven Principles for Cultivating Communities of Practice. </a>Harvard Business School Press.</li><li><a href="http://www.infed.org/biblio/communities_of_practice.htm">Communities of Practice.</a> Infed.org.</li></ul><div class="blogger-post-footer"><img src="https://blogger.googleusercontent.com/tracker/902885274664531497-652877630502898251?l=newlearninginstitute.blogspot.com" alt="" width="1" height="1" /></div></div></div></div><div class="field field-name-field-blog-topics field-type-taxonomy-term-reference field-label-above"><div class="field-label">Topics:&nbsp;</div><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><a href="/blog-topics/social-networking" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Social Networking</a></div><div class="field-item odd"><a href="/blog_topics/communities_practice/index.html" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Communities of Practice</a></div><div class="field-item even"><a href="/blog-topics/digital-literacy" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Digital Literacy</a></div><div class="field-item odd"><a href="/blog-topics/professional-development" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Professional Development</a></div><div class="field-item even"><a href="/blog-topics/museums" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Museums</a></div></div></div>Wed, 15 Dec 2010 22:20:00 +0000Sarah Davis149 at http://www.newlearninginstitute.orghttp://www.newlearninginstitute.org/blog/communities-practice-national-postal-museum#commentsDesign Studio: A Practitioner’s Perspective.http://www.newlearninginstitute.org/blog/design-studio-practitioner%E2%80%99s-perspective <div class="field field-name-body field-type-text-with-summary field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even" property="content:encoded"><p><a href="http://3.bp.blogspot.com/_AJz3zglnLrs/TORvhQYbFcI/AAAAAAAABa8/aRfgw9UMRCI/s1600/artlab.JPG" onblur="try {parent.deselectBloggerImageGracefully();} catch(e) {}"><img src="http://3.bp.blogspot.com/_AJz3zglnLrs/TORvhQYbFcI/AAAAAAAABa8/aRfgw9UMRCI/s1600/artlab.JPG" alt="" style="margin: 0px auto 10px; display: block; text-align: center; cursor: pointer;" class="feature-top" id="BLOGGER_PHOTO_ID_5540676058696324546" /></a><br /><br />What if youth had an opportunity to both visit a museum<span style="font-style: italic;"> and</span> contribute to an exhibit? What would their experience look like? Yesterday, I spoke with Nancy Chou, who helps design programs for the <a href="http://newlearninginstitute.org/digital-media-programs/museum-programs/smithsonian-institution.html">Mobile Learning Institute at the Smithsonian</a>. She has helped develop a couple of programs that follow the design studio format I introduced in a <a href="http://newlearninginstitute.blogspot.com/2010/11/design-studio-approach-mobile-learning.html">previous post</a>, <span style="font-style: italic;">City of Ruins</span> and <span style="font-style: italic;">ArtScape</span>. When we talked, she highlighted the importance of audience, community contribution, and informed choice in the <a href="http://newlearninginstitute.org/digital-media-programs/museum-programs/smithsonian-institution.html">Mobile Learning Institute at the Smithsonian</a>’s programs. Below I’ve listed short program descriptions for City of Ruins and ArtScape, as well as excerpts from my interview with Nancy.<br /><br /><span style="font-weight: bold;">City of Ruins</span><br />Youth participants met for twice a week this month and last to contribute to a Mobile Video Series for the Smithsonian’s Hirshhorn Museum, part of a series of films based on the Cyprien Gaillard and Mario Garcia Torres exhibition. They reflected on these pieces, traveled off-site to view local “ruins” in person, and spoke with the visiting artist collective, Semiconductor. The short videos created by participants offer teen-developed interpretations of artwork and promote critical thinking to encourage viewers to build a deeper connection with the art.<br /><br /><span style="font-weight: bold;">ArtScape</span><br />Working in teams of 10 to 15 designers on two Fridays this month, youth participants designed an online space for other teens to post examples of art from their own communities. For this program, they are playing a key role in designing the space, launching it, and developing a plan for how to attract and sustain youth contributors to the site.</p><p><br /><br /><br /></p><ul style="font-weight: bold;"><li>Nancy, what is the efficacy of the design studio approach?</li></ul><p> </p><p>“Right now, we are implementing a design studio approach in the context of a museum. Putting young people in the role of creating media and activities for youth visitors in a museum is really central to what we’re doing. The problem is that in the current museum setting, young people may visit museums, but their level of engagement may not be as deep as their potential. For instance, they might text their friends while looking at a Calder exhibit. Alternately, they could be listening to a curator who is giving a talk and not make meaning from or connections to the objects they see. Our vision is to redefine this core experience for youth visitors. How do we do that? We put young people in the seat of creating media and activities that can eventually be offered to other young people who visit the museum on their own, on field trips, or through other programs.<br /><br />The design studio format provides a structured approach to work with young visitors to allow them to become producers, designers, and curators for other youth who visit museums. This experience gives young people in the program an audience: their peers. Knowing that what they create will be used by others transforms the whole experience.<br />…<br />Another major component of this format is that it creates a microcosm of a real-world experience. Young people work collectively to achieve a specific design task. <a href="http://4.bp.blogspot.com/_AJz3zglnLrs/TOrIyWjyIRI/AAAAAAAABbQ/ty468dRy28E/s1600/Islands%2Bof%2BExpertise.JPG" onblur="try {parent.deselectBloggerImageGracefully();} catch(e) {}"><img src="http://4.bp.blogspot.com/_AJz3zglnLrs/TOrIyWjyIRI/AAAAAAAABbQ/ty468dRy28E/s320/Islands%2Bof%2BExpertise.JPG" alt="" style="margin: 0pt 0pt 10px 10px; float: right; cursor: pointer; width: 320px; height: 240px;" id="BLOGGER_PHOTO_ID_5542463058807496978" border="0" /></a>If the design task is to create an exhibit that will be shown in a museum, participants perform specific roles, be it exhibit organizer, video producer, marketing team member, or material/artifact team member. The participants’ relationship to each other is interdependent but also task-oriented. In this way, participants are able to pursue individual interests, as well as utilize a certain level of prior knowledge to become experts. The whole experience creates an interdependent collective group of teams working to do something that will be used in museums. And, as experts, the participants see how their knowledge will sustain the survival of the collective group.<br /><br />In contributing – by feeding back to the museum ecosystem instead of having an isolated experience – young participants are able to layer an understanding of how their individual role contributes to other human beings in their community.”<br /><br /> </p><ul style="font-weight: bold;"><li>How does this approach differ from programs developed in the past?</li></ul><p> </p><p>“The New Learning Institute’s current pedagogical approach is a response to the general shift in the understanding of how young people learn [see additional resources below]. The current field of digital media learning is not centered on the tools; it’s about how the tools shape-shift or reimagine the way students learn. Utilizing the design studio format is one approach we use to create effective learning ecologies. <a href="http://newlearninginstitute.blogspot.com/2010/11/design-studio-approach-mobile-learning.html">Roles of adults, learning spaces, rituals, and design principles</a> are all ways we provide pathways for young people to use tools as tools, not as the be-all and end-all outcome of their learning. A variety of methods can each contribute a useful “ingredient” to this “recipe.” Over time, the New Learning Institute continually refines the recipe for an approach that works.<br /> </p><blockquote><br />“We’re more interested in creating a culture that is conducive to learning. We take ideas of new learning and create a space that reflects that culture.”</blockquote><p> </p><p>The New Learning Institute’s initial approach involved integrating our methods (primarily digital storytelling) into the classroom culture, in a school setting that was predominately teacher-centered. Now, as digital media has increasingly become an integral part of young people’s lives, it’s clear that the way that youth learn with it is not a one-off; it’s an integrated part of their learning. In real life, we choose which tool is best. Today the New Learning Institute goes beyond digital storytelling to provide a menu of different tools. We give students and professional development workshop participants options so that they can determine which tool or tools fit best with the design or problem-solving task at hand. Now, there is more of a strategic approach to provide a menu of options, whether it’s podcasting, Photoshop, or different mobile devices. Once the foundation is laid, then participants choose the option with our support. NLI staff are facilitators, not just people providing a vertical direction of knowledge.”<br /><br /><span style="font-weight: bold;">Thanks!</span><br />Thanks to Nancy for talking with me and taking the time to explain all of the exciting developments in the New Learning Institute’s programs.<br /><span style="font-weight: bold;">Additional resources on design studios and new media learning:
</span><br /> </p><ul><li><a href="http://www.amazon.com/Video-Games-Teach-Learning-Literacy/dp/1403961697">Gee, J. P. (2007). What video games have to teach us about learning and literacy. New York: Palgrave Macmillan.</a></li><li><a href="http://mitpress.mit.edu/books/full_pdfs/Hanging_Out.pdf">Ito, M. (2010). Hanging out, messing around, and geeking out: Kids living and learning with new media. Cambridge, Mass: MIT Press.</a></li><li><a href="http://education.waikato.ac.nz/research/files/etpc/files/2010v9n1art7.pdf">Matthews, J. (2010). Using a studio-based pedagogy to engage students in the design of mobile-based media. English Teaching: Practice and Critique, 9(1), 87-102.</a></li><li><a href="http://dmlcentral.net/">DML Central</a></li><li><a href="http://projecthdesign.org/">Project H</a></li><li><a href="http://www.gameslearningsociety.org/">Games Learning Society</a></li></ul><div class="blogger-post-footer"><img src="https://blogger.googleusercontent.com/tracker/902885274664531497-1388189317869874079?l=newlearninginstitute.blogspot.com" alt="" width="1" height="1" /></div></div></div></div><div class="field field-name-field-blog-topics field-type-taxonomy-term-reference field-label-above"><div class="field-label">Topics:&nbsp;</div><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><a href="/blog-topics/nliatwork" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">NLIatWork</a></div><div class="field-item odd"><a href="/blog_topics/design_studio/index.html" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Design Studio</a></div><div class="field-item even"><a href="/blog-topics/project-based-learning" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Project Based Learning</a></div><div class="field-item odd"><a href="/blog-topics/museums" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Museums</a></div><div class="field-item even"><a href="/blog-topics/digital-learning" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Digital Learning</a></div><div class="field-item odd"><a href="/blog-topics/21st-century-skills" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">21st Century Skills</a></div></div></div>Tue, 16 Nov 2010 19:12:00 +0000Sarah Davis156 at http://www.newlearninginstitute.orghttp://www.newlearninginstitute.org/blog/design-studio-practitioner%E2%80%99s-perspective#commentsThe Design Studio Approach: Mobile Learning Institute at the Smithsonianhttp://www.newlearninginstitute.org/blog/design-studio-approach-mobile-learning-institute-smithsonian <div class="field field-name-body field-type-text-with-summary field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even" property="content:encoded"><p><a href="http://2.bp.blogspot.com/_AJz3zglnLrs/TORy94ckUNI/AAAAAAAABbE/XAqCvVI9jR0/s1600/artlab%2B2.JPG" onblur="try {parent.deselectBloggerImageGracefully();} catch(e) {}"><br /><img src="http://2.bp.blogspot.com/_AJz3zglnLrs/TORy94ckUNI/AAAAAAAABbE/XAqCvVI9jR0/s1600/artlab%2B2.JPG" style="margin: 0px auto 10px auto; display: block; text-align: center; cursor: pointer;" class="feature-top" border="0" /></a><br /><br />How do we create a learning culture that puts the young person at the center of the experience, that inspires creativity and innovation, and that actualizes learning by doing – not in theory only, but in practice? The design studio style of learning that is central to the <a href="http://hirshhorn.si.edu/">Hirshhorn Museum </a>programs presented by the <a href="http://newlearninginstitute.org/digital-media-programs/museum-programs/smithsonian-institution.html#">Mobile Learning Institute at the Smithsonian </a>is an example of how museums can engage visitors in this way.<br /><br /><strong>The Design Studio Learning Environment</strong><br />Design studios can be successful in developing rich and engaging learning experiences for the 21st century learner. Core components of successful design studios include: project-based work, incorporation of design solutions, formal and informal critique, consideration of issues, thinking with examples and thinking about the whole, creative use of constraints, and emphasizing design media.1 In sum, the combined elements of an effective design studio cultivate a learning space where youth are active participants and problem-solvers, where adults play the role of facilitators and experts, and where learning is experiential.2<br /><br /><strong>The Hirshhorn Design Studio Learning Space</strong><br />The Hirshhorn’s “ArtLab+” (the physical learning space) is a digital media studio that incorporates the following characteristics:<br /><br />• Flexibility to encourage both small and large group collaboration<br />• Youth relevance<br />• Flexible and modular design</p><p> </p><p>The tables and chairs in ArtLab+ are purposely arranged in a way that reflects a studio instead of a classroom, with table/chair “modules” that frequently shift to accommodate specific tasks. For example, tables were positioned as one large rectangular work station on the first day of the workshop so that participants were able to work on brainstorming ideas for their projects.<br /><br /><strong>Design Principles</strong><br />Design principles refer to the specific set of values that shape what takes place in the physical space/studio environment. Characteristics include:<br /><br />• Participant assumption of roles/identities<br />• Short iterative cycles<br />• Frequent critique sessions<br />• Dispersed community<br />• Skills as strategies<br />• Distributed knowledge<br />• Facilitators as co-designers<br /><br />Where a mobile video series component is the central part of the final collective project, participants can begin with exploring photography, since the core skills such as framing, lighting, etc. are closely related to videography. Participants may start out in a short task that involves going out to take a photo using the Rule of Thirds. The next design cycle may involve the students applying this skill to a five-second video capture of the same object with panning and zooming.<br /><br /><strong>Rituals <a href="http://1.bp.blogspot.com/_AJz3zglnLrs/TN2t5-H66OI/AAAAAAAABZY/0dna8pjVXZQ/s1600/directional%2Bforce.JPG"><img src="http://1.bp.blogspot.com/_AJz3zglnLrs/TN2t5-H66OI/AAAAAAAABZY/0dna8pjVXZQ/s200/directional%2Bforce.JPG" alt="" style="margin: 0px 0px 10px 10px; width: 164px; float: right; height: 200px;" id="BLOGGER_PHOTO_ID_5538774328175945954" border="0" /></a></strong><br />Rituals refer to a specific set of social practices that are integral to all Mobile Learning Institute at the Smithsonian’s Hirshhorn Museum programs. These rituals include:<br /><br />• Community circles<br />• Design task cards<br />• Community design board<br />• Design journals<br /><br /><a href="http://4.bp.blogspot.com/_AJz3zglnLrs/TN2ttKfY4AI/AAAAAAAABZQ/UNHx1LvURqo/s1600/Rule%2Bof%2BThirds.JPG"><img src="http://4.bp.blogspot.com/_AJz3zglnLrs/TN2ttKfY4AI/AAAAAAAABZQ/UNHx1LvURqo/s200/Rule%2Bof%2BThirds.JPG" alt="" style="margin: 0px 10px 10px 0px; width: 164px; float: left; height: 200px;" id="BLOGGER_PHOTO_ID_5538774108157304834" border="0" /></a>Design task cards in these programs fall into two categories: <em>Skill Building Cards</em> and <em>Content Understanding Cards</em>. Skill Building Cards are a series of cards geared toward developing expertise around specific new-media skills, such as video capture and editing. Content Understanding Cards are directed toward developing understanding of a certain content goal, such as art interpretation. Within each of these categories, there are three to five cards that focus on specific participant-centered activities. Cards are ranked by skill development. For instance, after students understand and apply the “Rule of Thirds,” they might be ready to advance to “directional force.”</p><p> </p><p>In the next entry, we’ll take a look at some of the ways the New Learning Institute has incorporated the design studio approach and how we are shifting our methods to accommodate the new media learner of today.<br /><br /><strong>Additional resources on design studios:</strong><br />1: S. Kuhn, The Software Design Studio: an exploration, IEEE Software, March/April, 1988.<br />2: J. Matthews, “Using a studio-based pedagogy to engage students in the design of mobile-based media,” English Teaching: Practice and Critique, May 2010: 88.</p><div class="blogger-post-footer"><img src="https://blogger.googleusercontent.com/tracker/902885274664531497-5247632550233573922?l=newlearninginstitute.blogspot.com" alt="" width="1" height="1" /></div></div></div></div><div class="field field-name-field-blog-topics field-type-taxonomy-term-reference field-label-above"><div class="field-label">Topics:&nbsp;</div><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><a href="/blog-topics/nliatwork" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">NLIatWork</a></div><div class="field-item odd"><a href="/blog_topics/design_studio/index.html" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Design Studio</a></div><div class="field-item even"><a href="/blog-topics/project-based-learning" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Project Based Learning</a></div><div class="field-item odd"><a href="/blog-topics/museums" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Museums</a></div><div class="field-item even"><a href="/blog-topics/digital-learning" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Digital Learning</a></div><div class="field-item odd"><a href="/blog-topics/21st-century-skills" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">21st Century Skills</a></div></div></div>Fri, 12 Nov 2010 17:52:00 +0000Sarah Davis157 at http://www.newlearninginstitute.orghttp://www.newlearninginstitute.org/blog/design-studio-approach-mobile-learning-institute-smithsonian#commentsVisible Thinking at the National Postal Museumhttp://www.newlearninginstitute.org/blog/visible-thinking-national-postal-museum <div class="field field-name-body field-type-text-with-summary field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even" property="content:encoded"><p>“The American Experience,” a five-day <a href="http://newlearninginstitute.org/digital-media-programs/museum-programs/smithsonian-institution.html">Mobile Learning Institute at the Smithsonian workshop </a>last summer, encouraged young participants to think innovatively about artifacts (inventions) in the collection of the <a href="http://www.postalmuseum.si.edu/">National Postal Museum</a>. Goals of the workshop were to help participants develop knowledge of a place (the museum); exhibit improved problem-solving, teamwork, and research skills; and increase self-esteem. Educators aimed to achieve these goals through a technique described as “Visible Thinking.”<br /><br /><a href="http://www.pz.harvard.edu/">Harvard’s Project Zero</a> defines <a href="http://www.pz.harvard.edu/research/VisThink.htm">Visible Thinking</a> as:</p><blockquote>“a systematic research-based approach to integrating the development of students' thinking with content learning across the subject matters. An extensive and adaptable collection of practices, Visible Thinking has a double goal: on the one hand, to deepen subject-matter learning and on the other to cultivate students' disposition toward thinking.”</blockquote><p><a href="http://www.pz.harvard.edu/vt/visibleThinking_html_files/03_ThinkingRoutines/03d_UnderstandingRoutines/ConnectExtendChallenge/ConnectExtend_Routine.html" style="font-weight: bold;">Connect-Extend-Challenge</a> is one of the thinking routines that guides learners’ thought processes in Visible Thinking. The routine “helps students make connections between new ideas and prior knowledge” (<a href="http://www.pz.harvard.edu/vt/visibleThinking_html_files/03_ThinkingRoutines/03d_UnderstandingRoutines/ConnectExtendChallenge/ConnectExtend_Routine.html">Project Zero</a>). In the American Experience workshop, through every activity leading up to and including the final activity, facilitators challenged participants to connect (view the museum objects in context), extend (understand how the objects could be used to solve problems of today), and challenge (think about the long-term effects of the museum objects for communities). This process, along with the supplemental aid of digital media, enabled participants to feel more connected to the museum and the inventive spirit.<br /><br />Here’s how the Connect-Extend-Challenge thinking routine worked in this setting:</p><p><br /><br /></p><ul><li>Connect: Participants looked at the problems the inventors were solving through historical context. They were then asked to consider: What caused these problems? How did people try to address them? Were they quick fixes or more lasting solutions? What was innovative or inventive about the solutions? What would you (the participant) have done in that situation? How do the problems relate to you personally? How do you relate to museum artifacts?</li></ul><ul><li>Extend: Participants extended the problems to today. Then they were asked to answer the following: Do we have the same problems or similar ones? What modern solutions are proposed or in action?</li></ul><ul><li>Challenge: Participants considered the problems in a different context. Using some of the innovative points of view they had been learning, they were asked how they thought the problems could be solved and if they expected any unintended consequences as a result.</li></ul><p>One of the first activities involved creating a purpose for an invention and supporting it. The facilitators passed out photos of National Postal Museum artifacts to groups of participants. They then asked the groups, who did not know the actual purpose of these artifacts, to interpret and define the artifacts’ functions and create commercials for them. The imaginative “inventions” conceived by the groups included the “face changer,” “brass knuckles,” “snuggly wuggly pants,” and “four-in-one wheel.” After the groups developed scripts for their respective inventions, they huddled in various parts of the room to film their commercials with mobile phones.<br /><br />In the background, I observed the snuggly wuggly pants group as they filmed their commercial. The members of the group took turns on camera, each describing how the snuggly wuggly pants fit a “need” in a way that might be appealing to the public. Then, they took their raw footage back to the computer lab to edit. Fixated in front of laptops, the group members worked together smoothly and efficiently, deciding which parts should be cut, which should remain, and how they should flow. Afterward, they gathered in front of the larger group to present their work. The facilitator asked questions like “What problem was this solving?"; "Was this commercial convincing?"; "What techniques did you use to convince people to buy the product?” Through the educators’ techniques and use of media to spark the projects, participants were highly engaged.<br /><br />Additional Reading on Visible Thinking:
</p><ul><li><a href="http://www.pz.harvard.edu/vt/visibleThinking_html_files/VisibleThinking1.html">Project Zero’s Visible Thinking Website</a>.</li></ul><ul><li><a href="http://www.pz.harvard.edu/vt/visibleThinking_html_files/06_AdditionalResources/SusanBarahal2008.pdf">Susan Barahal. "Thinking about Thinking: Preservice teachers strengthen their thinking artfully." Phi Delta Kappan, 90 (4). pp. 298-302.</a></li></ul><ul><li><a href="http://www.pz.harvard.edu/vt/visibleThinking_html_files/06_AdditionalResources/makingthinkingvisibleEL.pdf">Ron Ritchhart and David Perkins. "Making Thinking Visible," Educational Leadership 65, no. 5 (February 2008): pp. 57-61.</a></li></ul><div class="blogger-post-footer"><img src="https://blogger.googleusercontent.com/tracker/902885274664531497-4029085600623358940?l=newlearninginstitute.blogspot.com" alt="" width="1" height="1" /></div></div></div></div><div class="field field-name-field-blog-topics field-type-taxonomy-term-reference field-label-above"><div class="field-label">Topics:&nbsp;</div><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><a href="/blog-topics/nliatwork" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">NLIatWork</a></div><div class="field-item odd"><a href="/blog-topics/project-based-learning" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Project Based Learning</a></div><div class="field-item even"><a href="/blog-topics/museums" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Museums</a></div><div class="field-item odd"><a href="/blog-topics/digital-learning" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Digital Learning</a></div></div></div>Tue, 09 Nov 2010 21:17:00 +0000Sarah Davis158 at http://www.newlearninginstitute.orghttp://www.newlearninginstitute.org/blog/visible-thinking-national-postal-museum#comments